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Teaching in America - questions!

Discussion in 'Overseas trained teachers' started by bumblepop, Aug 17, 2009.

  1. Hi there!
    There is a strong possibility my bf of 5 years will get a job in America in the next couple of years. We plan on getting married in the next couple of years so i would also go with him.
    I'm starting my PGCE in September. Its a key stage 2/3 ICT course at Newman.
    I dont know what state we would move to but i just wondered what i might have to do to get a teaching job over there. I intend to teach primary/elementary. I also intend on completing my PGCE/QTS years here in the UK so that if we ever came back i would hopefully still be qualified (would i still be qualified?)
    Are the PGCE's valid over there or would i need to complete a few exams or do a whole new qualification?
    Also, v random question. If, we do stay in America for the rest of our lives, would i be able to have my parents live with us when they are old?
    Thanks for any help you can give!
    x
     
  2. Hi there!
    There is a strong possibility my bf of 5 years will get a job in America in the next couple of years. We plan on getting married in the next couple of years so i would also go with him.
    I'm starting my PGCE in September. Its a key stage 2/3 ICT course at Newman.
    I dont know what state we would move to but i just wondered what i might have to do to get a teaching job over there. I intend to teach primary/elementary. I also intend on completing my PGCE/QTS years here in the UK so that if we ever came back i would hopefully still be qualified (would i still be qualified?)
    Are the PGCE's valid over there or would i need to complete a few exams or do a whole new qualification?
    Also, v random question. If, we do stay in America for the rest of our lives, would i be able to have my parents live with us when they are old?
    Thanks for any help you can give!
    x
     
  3. Nead2604

    Nead2604 New commenter

    Every state has it own standards. Teaching in the USA is very VERY different than teaching here. I was a teacher in the USA and when I came here had to simply do the PGCE to qualify to teach here because of the vast differences. You will need to get a license from the state and there is a huge test to do this.I don't know how you can take the test ( and possibly TESTS, plural!) without re-training in the USA.California, for example, requires additional testing for licensure to teach than say...Tennessee. Go online and read about testing for licensure to teach in the USA.

    The biggest difference, I found, is that we don't have anything like a GCSE.
    In the states, you NEVER teach to the test! Final grades are culmulative and everything counts: Homework, projects, minor tests, mid-term tests, final exams, class participation, etc....All these have a percentage of importance and the final tally, at the end of the school year, determines if a student passes or fails. Failure means the student has to repeat the course or make up in summer school.Tests are usually designed by the teacher....and again, one NEVER teaches to the test.

    You also have to know in depth American History, not matter what you teach .

    A new teaching qualification in the USA is two years, not one. One year of intensive lectures and University based work specific to your field, and then one year placement and papers.

    As for your parents, you need to check immigration in the USA which is much tighter than it used to be. You can go on the website to see what the criteria are. As you are an adult and they are adults, their immigration would not be dependent upon you at all I wouldn't think....meaning that they would have to apply for immigration under independent criteria, apart from being related to you. They could not be your dependents is what I mean.They would have to prove income to be self supporting.

    A good site to look at is the University of Kentucky listing of teacher licensure standards required state by state.
    http://www.uky.edu/Education/TEP/usacert.html
    Browse a couple of potential states to check it out.

    You will definitely have to pass the PRAXIS tests, at least I, II and III to obtain licensure and there are a handful of states that have an additional STATE test that you must pass.You will also have to pass the PLT (“Principles of Learning and Teaching”) test which is heavily based upon Educational Psychology. When I was getting my PGCE here I was amazed that there were NO Psychology courses involved. In the USA, Psychology is a huge part of a teacher's training and, as a precursor to being accepted on the teaching course in the USA, I was required to have two years of psychology at University level to be accepted into the teaching program. The bulk of my initial studies to become a teacher were psychology. Yet another difference. Here is a site to give you an idea about the Praxis tests.
    http://www.testprepreview.com/praxis_practice.htm
    You will be able to get an idea....be aware that you will have to know advanced grammar and mathematics, which is something completely different between our educational systems. SO you will be tested on algebra and geometry as well as things like identifying advance sentence structures for your Praxis.You will also have to write two essays for each test.
    Have a look at the University of Kentucky site, look up the licensure standards for each state, then you can google some of the tests to get an idea of what you need to do to become licensed to teach.
    Good Luck!





     
    SRanu likes this.
  4. Wow! You've been incredibly helpful, thank you!
     
  5. If you are travelling out to the US as the dependent of your husband, you are likely to find that your visa will prevent you from working for the first year. You can take this opportunity to complete the required exams.
    If you want to sponsor your parents to come and live with you, first you will have to take out US citizenship. You then have to apply for a visa for them and demonstrate that you can support them. Visa numbers are not unlimited and your parents may have to wait around 15 years from your application before they are allocated a visa number.
    If you can, get your PGCE and NQT year done in the UK before leaving for the US - makes life easier if you wish to return to the UK to teach in the future.
    Best of luck.
     
  6. Thank you littlejim!
     
  7. You might look into teaching in private schools. Generally, they don't require the state licences - though many prefer advanced degrees. www.educationgroup.com might be a good place to start. (There is also another placement agency Carney and something - sorry I can't find the link!) There are a lot of upsides to teaching in the Private School sector (but also some downsides). For many of them, you can get your feet wet by substitute teaching!

    Also, don't worry too much about the American History part - I have met plenty (and I do mean PLENTY) of teachers who don't know split peas from corn syrup about American History.

    Though it sounds like Nead2604 comes from a state with really high standards - try to move there!

    Best of luck to you!
     
  8. Hi There~
    Just wanted to mention that
    Nead2604 was right about one thing: every state has their own requirements. Which means that all the rest of their info is not entirely accurate. Please, PLEASE, contact either the credentialing agency (if the state has one), or a university to find out what you need to do. Also, if you join an educational society, such as KDP, PDK, or a state association such as CTA, they will also help you through the process.
    Good Luck!
     
  9. Thanks guys! All useful information and gratefully received.
    Where do you all teach and do you enjoy it?
     
  10. Depending on the state you will teach in the requirements will change. In New york City you need to be qualified with a master degree in teaching in the subject you intend to teach . There are programs like Teach for America and NYC teaching fellows that you can look into . These are programs that let you teach full time while you gain your masters degree. The tuition fees and everything is paid for and most of the time you get a lot of money back from the Americorps.

    Make sure you call the education department of the city you will be going to live in and take it from there. There are other requirements like getting your blood tests done ,Fingerprinting etc. All these need to be sorted.

    If you plan to teach in NY send me a message . I have taught there for a couple of years and know people and can give you guidance as to where to go and who to call ...

    Cheers ! and Good Luck!
     
  11. Hi Bumblepop,
    Others have given some great suggestions here, so I'll just add one more to the list.
    You might want to try Visiting International Faculty, which is what many Canadian teachers do when they want to teach in the USA. I know it's hard to get into their program, but I imagine that if you are accepted, it should make your transition to teaching in the states a bit easier.
    Here's their website: http://www.vifprogram.com/stories/teachers/
    Good luck!
    Victoria
     
  12. Brilliant! Thank you both very much :)
     
  13. Hi, I am really interested in teaching in NYC. At the moment I am finishing my NQT year. I would love to start teaching there September 2011. How do I go about applying for jobs/ applying for a visa? Any info would be greatly appreciated! Thanks, Emma
     
  14. Hi Victoria,
    I have applied to VIF 2 days ago and waiting for approval. I have read that there are lots of steps involved in the process to get accepted in this program. I'm a little nervous about the phone interview and the face-to-face interview. I would like to prepare for the interviews in some way but I would like to know what to expect from the first interview (phone) and the 2nd interview (face-to-face). Do you remember a special question that was difficult for you to answer right away? Also I have read that I have to write an essay of 5000 words! Do you know what is it about or is it a different subject for each candidate? I know I have lots of questions but I'm very interested in going to the USA (I'm from Spain by the way).
    Thank you [​IMG]
    Gabriela
     
  15. cheesecake40

    cheesecake40 New commenter

    Hi bumblepop,

    I am currently doing my Pgce for the lifelong learning sector.As a family were are considering moving out to the states too, at some time.My other half has family there,in Illinois. There is so much to consider.

    Each state has it`s own requirements.You would need to have your teaching certificates transcribed,this is so they (the American`s ) can decide if your teaching (certificates) are recognized/valid in that particular state.There are even state to state regulations. It` not like the UK where there is a blanket certification.So for me I went to " Illinois State Board of Education".I found a list of agencies that were approved by the board, who would be able to to evaluate my Foreign credentials ,against their standards (scary huh?). This process of using these agencies isn`t free either. I know that the British Agency for transcribing certificates Is NARIC. But again you would have to check with the particular state that your interested in if Naric is recognized,they may have their preferred list.

    As some one who has trained outside of the US,we would be termed as "Applicants prepared as Educators Outside of the United States" As such what ever state you wish to teach in,You have to contact that specific "Board of Education."

    As a side note ,I went on to the American Embassy site to have a look at visas etc.The site is very useful and can be navigated with ease,which is helpful when you want answers! Again there is a whole process to prepare for. if immigration is an option for consideration ,then once your sponsor`s application has been approved,(and your application has it`s self been passed through 2 agencies,)you then have to have a medical,and this is very thorough !!,for which you pay for,and only a doctor who has been assigned by the us Government can perform the examination...Once they have interviewed you,and are satisfied.Your visa is then handed to you in a sealed envelope,that can only be opened by a
    border personnel. This is the process that is required for immigration,I am not sure if it is this stringent for other types of visa`s.
    Hope this helps.x
    p.s Does any one know of any teaching agencies for UK teacher`s???
     
  16. davidralison1

    davidralison1 New commenter

    I have been teaching in the US for 8 years I initially went to teach in Boston at the british International School (Now owned by Nord Anglia) they have schools in New York, Chicago, Boston , Charlotte, Houston and Washington DC. It was an amazing experience because they make the move so simple.All things such as health care , orientation , social security cards are taken care of even help with passing your driving test the pay is very good flights home , shipping etc . A few like me obtained green cards and have moved to pastures new. I am living and teaching in sunny South Carolina. It is pain to get transcripts from Uk universities but pretty straightforward. Yes you do have to sit the praxis test for most states but some are reciprocal . It will take several months so be prepared.
    The biggest deal for us was getting to grips with paying for health care when we left as state to star it is ver different
    but all this has been worthwhile and we have loved living here GO FOR IT!!!
     
  17. sabrinakat

    sabrinakat Star commenter

    You do realise the thread is four years old?:eek::)
     

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