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Teaching in a special school.............

Discussion in 'Personal' started by BelleDuJour, Nov 2, 2010.

  1. In fairness, I've cried twice because of two students with disabilities. One had cerebral palsy and the condition worsened during their sixth form studies really significantly. They really wanted to go to university but they were too ill. I cried with them, in disappointment and frustration, and away from them because I realised that they weren't going to live very far into adulthood.
    The second student was/is blind. A real go-getter but frustrated and hampered by well-meaning people who wouldn't let them just get on with life. They did eventually but it was difficult. I cried in frustration about that one.
    But definitely not for what 'could have been' with them.
     
  2. Doglover

    Doglover Occasional commenter

    I am sorry Belle, I understand why they have difficulty accessing the curriculum. I still believe they have every right to access it though.
    What sets the children that you teach apart from mine, is the fact they have severe learning difficutlies.
    My youngest has tendencies towards self-harm when in meltdown - pulling her hair, grabbing and pulling at the skin on her face, hitting herself on the head. Both can be very verbally agressive when in meltdown, and both of them have thrown things, kicked things across the room etc. It is indeed very difficult to watch and deal with this kind of behaviour.
    I didn't really want to post that here tbh, but I want to highlight to you that certain behaviours are not peculiar to those at the lower end of the spectrum.
     
  3. bumblingbee

    bumblingbee New commenter

    I know many parents of children with autism (I have an autistic son myself) and most have wept over what might have been. An empathetic member of staff could well feel something similar I imagine.
     
  4. Doglover

    Doglover Occasional commenter

    I have cried at the stress my children suffer daily. I have cried because sometimes I am so physically and emotionally exhausted by it. I have cried at the frustration of not being able to secure services they need.
    I have never cried for what may have been. They are my children, no matter what. They are what they are, and I cannot and would not change that.
     
  5. Belle, most people here have, like you, an interest in autism, both personal and professional. I'm not sure what kind of advice you wanted because you don't seem interested in discussion with anyone who has the experience and knowledge which might make such advice useful. Any practical advice will be grounded in a theoretical basis - the very stuff you want us to "agree to disagree" about rather than engage in a debate which might prove very enlightening for everyone involved.
    I'm sorry but this is a shocking statement - how anyone involved in education can think that there's no need for critical reflection on practice is beyond me. As far as I can see, Dande's original post was spot on - you didn't want anything other than some mutual back slapping.
     
  6. dande

    dande New commenter

    You have clearly said some things about the people in your care and their condition (I hope using this word causes no offence) that have at best upset some posters and clearly offended others. They have the right to respond. You have either been extremely naive in what you have said or clearly don't care about others in the way you profess to do.
    After sympathy? No offence but if you chose to work in this field this is part and parcel of the territory and you will have to learn to live with it as many of the parents have to day in day out. Perhaps you would have been better off not mentioning this?
     
  7. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Airy.....I said without criticism not critical reflection.
    I don't want my back slapped...........that is patronising but again, like others on here if you think you csn come and do better and give me the benefit of your experience please do so.
     
  8. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    After sympathy....no.
    I said in my PM to Doglover it was all part of the job as it is. Sorry I didn't mention it on here but there you go. Don't make assumptions.
     
  9. It read differently - like many of your posts which seem to have different meanings as soon as they are challenged in any way. You want the benefit of my experience? When someone is obviously speaking from a position of authority I listen.
     
  10. For what it's worth I think Belle is being given a bit of a hard time. I read her original post as very positive and inspiring. I can understand how the subject can be sensitive for those with first-hand experience but, yet again on this forum, I think some people have blown any issues raised out of proportion.
     
  11. dande

    dande New commenter

    Then why even bother putting it? I think we all accept that the 'rules' are different when working in special schools. And why mention it after you were challenged? Trying to further explain you tears today because your original explanation failed to wash with some posters?
     
  12. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    Dande....as I said, if you think you can do better then come on down. If not, in the words of my daughter, just 'do one'.
     
  13. dande

    dande New commenter

    She made a rather sweeping statement for which there is no apparent evidence - a poster even contacted a specific organisation wish knows of no such report/findings. People have rightly challenged her on this. She has also made additional comments, which I feel, have upset/offended other posters. They are entitled to their response and I for one support them in this. And that is without the other (minor) comments in which she tells posters what they can and cannot do on this forum.
     
  14. dande

    dande New commenter

    Correction - for can and cannot read should and should not
     
  15. dande

    dande New commenter

    How pleasant.
     
  16. Doglover

    Doglover Occasional commenter

    Belle, had you asked for specific advice, I would have been glad to offer some.
    If you want specific advice about something, then I am sure many will be glad to help, if you could point out what you want advice about.
     
  17. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter


    and many also agreed with me, but you chose not to take issue with them.
     
  18. dande

    dande New commenter

    Please go through - I will keep it simple for you - referring only to your comment about crying for the children for what they might have been. (I paraphrase here) - and let us know how many have agreed with you.
     
  19. As another of your backslapping threads, this one has gone horribly wrong for you. Might it be worthwhile taking some time to reflect on why this may be?
     
  20. mandala1

    mandala1 Occasional commenter

    I read Belle's original post very much in the context of someone who was new to special ed and who was quite shocked at what she had experienced. I didn't see anything offensive, needing to be picked to pieces.
     

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