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Teaching Guitars

Discussion in 'Music' started by rhianyaminali, Jan 10, 2010.

  1. I invested in 20 acoustic guitars about a year ago. I have got quite a few ideas/songs for developing pupils' skills in this area (Horse with No Name, Coldplay, Beyonce - If I were a Boy, Eleanor Rigby, well known riffs etc) but if anyone has any ideas they are willing to share, I would be most grateful. Thanks!
     
  2. I invested in 20 acoustic guitars about a year ago. I have got quite a few ideas/songs for developing pupils' skills in this area (Horse with No Name, Coldplay, Beyonce - If I were a Boy, Eleanor Rigby, well known riffs etc) but if anyone has any ideas they are willing to share, I would be most grateful. Thanks!
     
  3. I've done some guitar in lessons. Students find it difficult because, from the start, they are havning to co-ordinate two hands. I have a very simple arrangement of various songs that require just bass notes and singing to start. These worked except the singing was poor.
    Chords present different problems with multiple fingers having work move around the fret board - without a guitar at home to practice on it was hard to make progress. Power chords did work to a certain extend.
    In the end 'm afraid I gave up.Sorry.
     
  4. Well thanks for taking the time to reply. Appreciate it. Anyone else out there got any ideas please? Going to try next with them the start of duelling banjos that they have to work out themselves - my pupils really seem totally motivated by guitars (just do approx 3-4 weeks out of my usualy syallbus, then back to the syallbus, then we revisit say 2 months later)
     
  5. I do a 6 week beginner guitar course - it is very popular with my students many of whom buy their own guitars and take up private lessons.
    Thirty students in each class share about 21 guitars. In practice it is less as strings break. I start with well-known one-string riffs - some students know them already, others take 6 weeks to play through the first one.
    After two lessons, we move on to the tune from My Heart Will Go On - that usually takes another 3 weeks. A few students then move on to chords which they usually find much harder - I find a song from the current charts that only uses chords I IV and V and transpose into A.
    Once guitars are handed out at the beginning of each lesson, I go round tuning them.
    The last week is class concert where students work is assessed. I create simple guitar tab parts for subsequent schemes of work so that students can develop their guitar skills.
     
  6. I do 2 seperate 4 week blocks - one block of guitar chords and the other of guitar tab. For chords a just start them with basic chords, starting with Em and Am - getting them to be able to go between them - then build up with more chords when they are able (C then D7 then A then G then E and finally D). I have all chords up on the wall in both chord boxes and description (eg String 5 fret 2, string 4 fret 2 for Em).
    For guitar tab I have a few exercises on string 1 and string 2 getting them to use different fingers on the fret board then quite quickly go on to the Debut book of the Rockschool series.
    I have 10 guitars in my room and share one between two - pupils facing each other helping their partner. I find this works as they get sore fingers quite quickly and the sharing means they get a break quite frequently.
    Hope this helps.
     
  7. tanbur

    tanbur New commenter


    <font size="2">Another activity is entirely teacher directed - whole class, working in pairs, one guitar between two students. The student without a guitar has the task of correcting the partner. They swap the guitar over when instructed. Songs are selected that require simple chords in the key of G. Lesson one starts with folk tunes using simple C (top three strings) moving to simple G7. As they progress, melodies are introduced that require (simple) Em, C, G and G7. A few will play full chord versions. 'El Condor Pasa' uses G, C and Em. I've found that playing a recording encourages partners to sing and it also gives me the opportunity to observe students more closely. Another one that works with a recording is 'Dirty Old Town', chords G, C, D7, Em. A further stage develops use of these chords in the key of G for various versions of the 12 bar blues. </font>
     
  8. Got an almost the same experience. The kids were having a hard time changing of chords from another chord. And with strumming as well. I didn't try to teach them the power chords, I though they'll just find it more difficlut to learn it.
     
  9. ict04

    ict04 New commenter

    I started our (very) beginner kids off with Blackeyed Peas - 'I gotta feeling'.

    The guitar tabs are simple enough with one 'melody' line and a bass line both of which are repeated.

    Added in a 'karaoke' version on my iPod (running fairly softly in the background) for the kids to play along with/to.
     

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