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Teaching equations

Discussion in 'Science' started by lejames82, Jul 2, 2012.

  1. Hi all
    I'm just after any new ideas on activities to help students practise using equations in physics; I've got a couple of lessons in this new spec which are equations, then another one, then another one and I don't want a case of death by example questions.
    Any ideas to jazz it up and make it a little more interesting? Able and nice students so many things possible?
    Thanks
     
  2. Hi all
    I'm just after any new ideas on activities to help students practise using equations in physics; I've got a couple of lessons in this new spec which are equations, then another one, then another one and I don't want a case of death by example questions.
    Any ideas to jazz it up and make it a little more interesting? Able and nice students so many things possible?
    Thanks
     
  3. Orion

    Orion New commenter

    For velocity do a play...
    walk your fingers over your watch..... distance / over = speed or velocity!
    Loads of things like that. Helps them remember the equations.
    Also try pictures on PPT to represent the equation i.e. wave equation use image of Hertz hire car, light stick, swimming pool (length), ocean wave (wave)

    f=ma / W=mg use the idea of pictures of France = Mass (picture of one) x Ardvark
    then do similar for W = mg to compare....
     
  4. ScienceGuy

    ScienceGuy Established commenter

    I go for memorbale phrases e.g. for Voltage = current x resistance I use ****** increases randiness. Depending on the class you can get them to make up their own ones (I tend to suggest to my groups to make them slightly rude as they are more likely to remember them) or give their equation a story e.g. for change in velocity = acceleration x time I use the phrase Carroty Vomits Are Tasty and talk about the time my sister was having mashed carrot as a child, sicked it up , saw it on her bib and then ate it.
     
  5. Orion

    Orion New commenter

    Actually I should also add that a good tip is use the units...
    m/s - is distance over time.
    etc...
    Also good for AS Physics
     
  6. Sorry, perhaps I haven't explained myself very well. I'm not after ways to get them to remember things, I mean actual activities they can do rather than just doing examples; eg bingo, play your cards right etc so they ARE doing the calculations but are doing them in a slightly more interesting way?
     
  7. Orion

    Orion New commenter

    Tarsia Puzzles
     
  8. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    Do they actually work for anyone?

    My experience of using them (for maths) is:

    1. Lower set kids shuffle them round and claim to be finished when they feel like it.

    2. Higher set kids (including my own children who tell me they hate it when teacher get "that rubbish out") see the "jigsaw puzzle" as condescending ****.

    (In the words of my eldest son, "If I wanted to do a jigsaw, I'd get a jigsaw out of a box. I'm in that lesson to learn maths (actually, at the moment his issue is with Chemistry) - get us an exercise from a book thanks or at least a worksheet!")
     
  9. missmunchie

    missmunchie Occasional commenter

    Use some past paper questions as this is what they are aiming to answer in the end. Put them on your IWB and get the students to write in the answers in the spaces. My younger classes enjoy doing this and like to choose different colours to write with. It is a good way to talk about presentation of answers, layout, neatness and units as well. If it is a small class get them up one at a time to do different parts of the question. Then set more examples as homework so you are not doing loads in class.
     

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