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Teaching children with ADHD

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by madwoman, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. madwoman

    madwoman New commenter

    actually, the recent findings on ADHD have dismissed the diet claims, as it is part of the autism spectrum.
    If a brain (or any other organ) is defective in some way, eating junk will not make it degenerate, or eating healthy foods will not make it repair!
    Some kids with or without ADHD may have food sensitivity, but it is not a cause of ADHD

    "may be in a link in many cases between ADHD type behaviour and environmental triggers, which incidentally might include diet."

    Yes some if not all kids show some ADHD type behaviour at some stage,that doesn't mean they have ADHD, these cases may well have environmental or diet triggers


    keep reading!
     
  2. sorry but all the 'reading' in the world isn't going to make much difference. (My guess is that I have read a lot more than you on the subject of child psychology, and human psychology in general.)

    I'm not arguing that ADHD, or whatever you want to call it might 'exist' in the form of a defective brain. In a small % - less than 1% apparently - that could well be true.

    What I AM saying is that too many kids are being given the ADHD label without making a holistic assessment. Thats all.
     
  3. impis

    impis New commenter

    Madwoman, your posts are both informative and accurate. As a parent of a daughter with ADHD, and a teacher of pupils of ADHD in a special school, I agree entirely with all your views. Thank you for posting the information and links.
     
  4. madwoman

    madwoman New commenter

    "sorry but all the 'reading' in the world isn't going to make much difference. (My guess is that I have read a lot more than you on the subject of child psychology, and human psychology in general.)"

    I rest my case!If you don't want to be accused of ignorance...don't write things like this!

     
  5. madwoman

    madwoman New commenter

    Thank you Impis

    I am trying (in my small way) just to make teachers aware of the facts...not the rumour, which makes coping with ADHD difficult for both pupils and teachers.

    We all need to be aware of strategies in the classroom otherwise we are failing all our pupils not just those with an SEN.
     
  6. Re mis diagnosis... I have seen students who have been diagnosed ADHD, medicated and the a couple of years later re diagnosed as something else.

    With changing research and medical opinion some of these students will not remain ADHD, not from any change in them but 'diagnosis.'

    As teachers we deal with all children to the best of our ability within the school day. Our objectives are to ensure that they are happy in their environment and learn both academically and socially.

    With inclusion staff are dealing with cases which thirty years ago we would not have been in the averageclassroom.

    I feel is is grossly unfair to lambast the teaching profession for any errors made as opposed to the medical profession. Both professions are doing their best.

    I know that this will not be a popular view but many of the fiercest slating of the profession comes from people who have only found out about the syndromes in recent years and assume, incorrectly, that everyone else is at the same starting point as them.

    When you do your best with some great results, working with all the agencies, parents and students for many years it can be difficult not to be offended by this myopic attitude.



     
  7. Having got that off my chest I think the sharing of information is very valuable and the last post was not intented to imply otherwise.

    Sorry if it was sharp but I stand by the sentiment.

    See I've got up in a better mood this morning. Have a nice day all!
     
  8. madwoman

    madwoman New commenter

    I agree sunblest with your points too!

    "I feel is is grossly unfair to lambast the teaching profession for any errors made as opposed to the medical profession. Both professions are doing their best."

    If you felt that I was lambasting the teaching profession then I truly appologise.

    On the whole teachers do try very hard to make inclusion work, however this is impeded by a lack of knowledge and understanding.
    Many teachers do genuinely feel that ADHD is just a label for naughty kids.
    Thats why I posted the info, so teachers have access to facts not hear say.

    Hope you have a nice day too :)

     
  9. madwoman. Thanks for the information. As an NQT I had not been given any detailed information on ADHD and how to tackle it.

    A lot of what you said is consistent with how I would tackle any child with behaviour difficulties and it is good to know that is appropriate when a child is diagnosed with ADHD.
     
  10. We were very grateful when one of our ADHDs was naughty as he'd previously been too dopy with drugs to relate to his peers.
     
  11. madwoman

    madwoman New commenter

    sunblest

    Obviously the dosage was incorrect for that child.
    It is always difficult getting it correct as each child is different.
    We as teachers play an important role in helping the medical profession and parents in informing on the pupil's behaviour and the effects the medication has in school.
     
  12. Just to let you know that my 'reading' this week has included Sue Palmers excellent article in todays TES. I recommend it.
     
  13. OK, after reading the first post and putting it in a classroom scenario, when teaching a classfull of kids with ADHD... some don't work.


    "Sit the child close to you - ideally put them between two calm and well behaved pupils, and away from doors, windows and other potential distractions."

    So they can distract the quiet kids.

    "Try to find a way to allow them to fidget - squeeze balls are quiet!"

    And are also fantastic ammo!






     
  14. madwoman

    madwoman New commenter

    I must agree I wouldn't use the squeeze balls with some of my pupils either, but I might with others.


    Sitting them between two quiet pupils does help and I haven't known it to affect the quiet pupils at all.

    These are only recommendations, they are not commandments and each pupil is different and you will find out what works with each individual.
     
  15. The squeeze balls are good for the staff, otherwise known as stress balls.
     
  16. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    I know this is going to sound contraversial but...

    1. Where the hell were all the kids with ADHD when i was in school ten years ago!? I am sorry - i just dont believe it exists as a medical condition.

    2. As a teacher I didnt train in special needs by choice, and yet find myself having to 'educate' myself more and more about syndromes and conditions that come under the title 'special needs'

    3. By the time I have 'settled' and taken time to give individual attention to the average 3 pupils per class with such 'syndromes' 15 minutes of lesson time has passed and the other 31 pupils in the class have been neglected for not having a 'special need'
     
  17. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    I'm inclined to agree with that DaisysLot.

    Perhaps children with ADHD need to be educated separately for the good of the majority.
     
  18. Where were you guys when i needed you?
     
  19. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Well, I'm here now.

    I haven't actually planted my flag in either camp yet though.
     
  20. madwoman

    madwoman New commenter

    Daisy's lot
    " 1. Where the hell were all the kids with ADHD when i was in school ten years ago!? I am sorry - i just dont believe it exists as a medical condition."

    They were still there, and medication was used, but it wasn't talked about. It was actually discovered in 1865 but wasn't widely recognised until 1902.

    "2. As a teacher I didnt train in special needs by choice, and yet find myself having to 'educate' myself more and more about syndromes and conditions that come under the title 'special needs'"

    Nor me! but as professionals we are there to give every pupil in the classroom the best education we can..thats our job!


    "3. By the time I have 'settled' and taken time to give individual attention to the average 3 pupils per class with such 'syndromes' 15 minutes of lesson time has passed and the other 31 pupils in the class have been neglected for not having a 'special need' "

    I know it can be very frustrating at times, but ALL kids have different needs, not just those with SEN, and teaching has to be adapted accordingly. My worst pupils are those without a classified SEN but are just too chatty. I waste more time with those pupils than I do with SEN pupils. Does that mean I am neglecting other pupils? well probably. Ours is a very difficult job.

    My point in posting the info is to try to inform teachers do they can understand and make their teaching easier.



     

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