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Teaching children with ADHD

Discussion in 'Behaviour' started by madwoman, Aug 16, 2005.

  1. My son has ADHD and I was given a leaflet called "Teaching chilfren with ADHD"
    It is really useful

    I will paraphrase it for you and give contact details as it is of real benefit!

    ...."ADHD is a medical condition whoch severely impacts the quality of life of the children it affects and their families.

    ...As a teacher ypu are an important part of the ADHD managment process, along with the child's family and medical team.

    As a teacher you will feel understandably frustrated ans annoyed, but as a professional you must recognise that ADHD is a genuine illness. The child is not misbehaving on purpose (at least not always!)

    ADHD is an illness:

    ADHD is not a fancy label for naughty children or bad parents. All children misbehave sometimes and no parent is perfect.
    ADHD is a well defined and widely accespted medical condition. As with many medical conditions we don't know what the true cause is but we do know that:

    * ADHD tends to run in families
    * The brains of people with ADHD are different form other people. Specific areas of the brain show differences in structure, metabolism and chemistry.

    Each individual is different, the key symptoms of ADHD are:

    * Inattention - the child can't concentrate, skips from task to task, forgets instructions and is disorganised.
    * Hyperactivity - the child is restless, fidgety always fiddling and touching things
    * Impulsive behaviour - the child speaks and acts without thinking, can't wait their turn. Their may be temper outbursts.

    ALL children are sometimes inattentive, restless and impulsive. The point about AdHd is that these kinds of behaviour are extreme..........

    HELPFUL TIPS:

    1. Dont take it personally - there is a medical reason for much of the childs behaviour

    2. A Reason is not an excuse - ADHD is the reason for unacceptable behaviour, but not an excuse for it. With your help, children with ADHD can learn to control their behaviour better!

    3. Keep in contact with the parents - so that you know each others problems and share the same approach

    4. Sit the child close to you - ideally put them between two calm and well behaved pupils, and away from doors, windows and other potential distractions.

    5. Provide legitimate oppotunities to be physically active - let them be the one to go and fetch something, or wipe the board.

    6. Try to find a way to allow them to fidget - squeeze balls are quiet!

    7. Children with ADHD have difficulty palnning activities - and doing them in the right order. Its helpful to give an overview of what you want them to achieve: " your going to write a review of a book" then break it down into smaller steps: "First I'd like you to choose a book" ....etc
    A written checklist can be useful. Children with ADHD need practice in planning and sequencing activities.

    8. Beware of changes to routine : children with ADHD find this very unsettling. Explain in advance what is to happen and what to expect

    9. Improve their esteem - by praising IN PUBLIC for good behaviour, and repremanding them quietly one - to -one

    10. Teasing and bullying - setting them up with an older buddy can help.


    More information can be found here :

    ADDISS-Attention Deficit Information Services
    PO Box 340
    Egeware
    Middlesex
    HA8 9HL
    020 8906 9068
    info@addiss.co.uk

    Websites :

    www.adders.org
    www.addcentre.co.uk
    www.addiss.co.uk

    Books:

    Understanding ADHD - Christopher green and Kit Chee

    Managing attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder in the classroom - john Alban-Metcalf, and Juliette Alban -Metcalfe

     
  2. My son has ADHD and I was given a leaflet called "Teaching chilfren with ADHD"
    It is really useful

    I will paraphrase it for you and give contact details as it is of real benefit!

    ...."ADHD is a medical condition whoch severely impacts the quality of life of the children it affects and their families.

    ...As a teacher ypu are an important part of the ADHD managment process, along with the child's family and medical team.

    As a teacher you will feel understandably frustrated ans annoyed, but as a professional you must recognise that ADHD is a genuine illness. The child is not misbehaving on purpose (at least not always!)

    ADHD is an illness:

    ADHD is not a fancy label for naughty children or bad parents. All children misbehave sometimes and no parent is perfect.
    ADHD is a well defined and widely accespted medical condition. As with many medical conditions we don't know what the true cause is but we do know that:

    * ADHD tends to run in families
    * The brains of people with ADHD are different form other people. Specific areas of the brain show differences in structure, metabolism and chemistry.

    Each individual is different, the key symptoms of ADHD are:

    * Inattention - the child can't concentrate, skips from task to task, forgets instructions and is disorganised.
    * Hyperactivity - the child is restless, fidgety always fiddling and touching things
    * Impulsive behaviour - the child speaks and acts without thinking, can't wait their turn. Their may be temper outbursts.

    ALL children are sometimes inattentive, restless and impulsive. The point about AdHd is that these kinds of behaviour are extreme..........

    HELPFUL TIPS:

    1. Dont take it personally - there is a medical reason for much of the childs behaviour

    2. A Reason is not an excuse - ADHD is the reason for unacceptable behaviour, but not an excuse for it. With your help, children with ADHD can learn to control their behaviour better!

    3. Keep in contact with the parents - so that you know each others problems and share the same approach

    4. Sit the child close to you - ideally put them between two calm and well behaved pupils, and away from doors, windows and other potential distractions.

    5. Provide legitimate oppotunities to be physically active - let them be the one to go and fetch something, or wipe the board.

    6. Try to find a way to allow them to fidget - squeeze balls are quiet!

    7. Children with ADHD have difficulty palnning activities - and doing them in the right order. Its helpful to give an overview of what you want them to achieve: " your going to write a review of a book" then break it down into smaller steps: "First I'd like you to choose a book" ....etc
    A written checklist can be useful. Children with ADHD need practice in planning and sequencing activities.

    8. Beware of changes to routine : children with ADHD find this very unsettling. Explain in advance what is to happen and what to expect

    9. Improve their esteem - by praising IN PUBLIC for good behaviour, and repremanding them quietly one - to -one

    10. Teasing and bullying - setting them up with an older buddy can help.


    More information can be found here :

    ADDISS-Attention Deficit Information Services
    PO Box 340
    Egeware
    Middlesex
    HA8 9HL
    020 8906 9068
    info@addiss.co.uk

    Websites :

    www.adders.org
    www.addcentre.co.uk
    www.addiss.co.uk

    Books:

    Understanding ADHD - Christopher green and Kit Chee

    Managing attention deficit/ hyperactivity disorder in the classroom - john Alban-Metcalf, and Juliette Alban -Metcalfe

     
  3. Thank you!
     
  4. Your welcome!

     
  5. Hi Madwoman
    Thanks for that. Where did you get the leaflet from?
     
  6. Scrap that stupid question, just read the contacts on your post. Thank you
     
  7. Hi Poppit,

    I was actually given it by the ADHD clinic to give to school.

    You can get copies from the address listed.

    Also they said they were more than willing to give inset days at schools!

    Might be worth mentioning!
     
  8. If you have not seen this sort of information before do give a copy to your senco.

    Our senco keeps information of this sort on a selection of syndromes and circulates to the various departments. Some of the information we send off for but parents of students with 'new' syndromes are a valuable source of information.
     
  9. The debate over whether ADHD is an 'illness' is not settled yet. Obviously this company have a vested interest in pushing the 'medical model'line- there are big bucks to be made on 'advising' about ADHD. But far too many kids are being medicated/pathologised too readily. Its not just an issue of parenting but wider society. Children are now being prescribed very powerful drugs on the assumption that they have a 'medical condition' which is NOT widely accepted except by those who have a vested interest eg the pharmacuetical industry.

    I implore you to keep an open mind about this.
     
  10. "The debate over whether ADHD is an 'illness' is not settled yet"

    Look at some of the links.
    These were given to me from the NHS. It is proven that the brain of kids with ADHD is altered!
     
  11. Many, many years ago I went on a course run by a medical clinic in which they said that the messages sent by the brain did not travel as fast in hyper actives as in others.

    Obviously I've simplified this as I can't remember all the correct terms..would it be 'jumping the synaptic gap' or something. Anyway the main message was that although they appear to be going faster than everyone else they are in fact slower hence the prescription of amphetamens/speed.

    At the time America was prescribing 'hand over fist' but the UK were holding back because of the long term effects.
    It was emphasised that drugs were a last resort.

    I personally think other things can cause the same 'symptoms' as hyper activity but not being a medical person simply deal with whoever arrives in my classroom to the best of my ability.

     
  12. mindful

    This was not a company that issued this information it was the NHS

    This is the problem that pupils in schools face...complete ignorance. I'm not having a go at you, it just seems that kids/parents are just branded naughty, without any understanding.

    This is why I placed the info here so ignorant teachers can increase their knowledge and understanding.
    I can only assun=me that you didn't actually read it before judging as so many constantly do and inevitably the pupils suffer.
     
  13. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Madwoman:

    "Specific areas of the brain show differences in structure, metabolism and chemistry"

    I have the following questions about ADHD:

    Specifically, how are ADHD children's brains different?

    Where has this been proven and by whom?

    "Widely accepted" - Can this be quantified a little more clearly?
     
  14. http://www.playattention.com/attent ... /articles/is-the-adhd-brain-damaged/
    http://www.focusonyourchild.com/learning/art1/A0000491.html
    Skip to main content navigation Notify | Stats | Accessibility | Edit | Sign out Sign in
    [m] Home| Films| Partners| Broadcasters| News & Events| Contact Us| FAQ| [n] Local Navigation Health
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    © MMV | Privacy Brain Scans Show ADHD Differences
    [c]
    Broadcast Date: Tuesday 26 July 2005 12:15-12:25 GMT
    Summary: MRI Scanners & Attention-Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder
    Press Release
    Transcript


    Connection Options:
    Broadband | Narrowband | Transcript | Help
    Synopsis
    While behaviour differs from child to child, in most cases it is easy to understand. However, in the UK alone, there are some 150,000 children who suffer from severe Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) and their behaviour is not only hard to handle but can badly disrupt their lives.

    Researchers at King?s College London?s Institute of Psychiatry have been using functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging or fMRI to compare the brain activity of children with ADHD and those without it.

    In the first study of children with ADHD who have never taken medication for their condition, which could itself have altered the children's brain activity or architecture, the researchers discovered that ADHD sufferers had less activity in the right frontal lobe of their brains than those without the disorder.

    The area of the brain that is less active in children with ADHD is part of an ?Attention network?. This network is activated by people without the disorder in order to concentrate or control themselves. The particular brain region seen to be underactive in people with ADHD normally grows and becomes more active with age. However, in children with ADHD it does not seem to mature so quickly.

    Identifying the precise areas of the brain that are affected will greatly assist in finding ways to treat ADHD, and also show sufferers that there is a specific physiological cause for their problems.

    Further Resources
    Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
    Institute of Psychiatry
    Profile - Dr Katya Rubia
    General Information
    King's College London


    ALL STORIES ARE AVAILABLE TO ALL APTN SUBSCRIBERS ON TUESDAY 26 JULY 12:15 TO 12:25 GMT. AVAILABLE FOR GENERAL VIEWING FROM 15:00 GMT ON TUESDAY 26 JULY. ALL SCRIPT INFORMATION AND VIDEO PREVIEWS ON www.RESEARCH-TV.COM FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL RESEARCH-TV ON: 44 (0) 207 004 7130.

    Page owner: S Wong Last revised: Tue, Jul 26, 2005 Back to top of page

     
  15. YesMrBronson

    YesMrBronson New commenter

    Thanks Sport.

    I asked those questions because I am still making my mind up about the evidence for and against ADHD's existance and causes.
     
  16. 'It is proven that the brain of kids with ADHD is altered!'

    I am not denying that the brain pattern is altered but we don't know quite what alters it. There is no conclusive evidence to show that this is genetically inherited. You should be aware that there exists a 'medical model' of dealing with emotional and behavioural problems in this country and it is still the basis of modern psychiatry. The NHS subscribes to this model because diagnosis is relatively simple, it is based on behaviour rather than a more holistic assessment and it is cheap to treat, usually through medication and behaviour management techniques.

    I am heartily sick of parents who jump down the throat of others who say 'hang on a sec here' and call them 'ignorant' when they are nothing of the kind. There is far more to ADHD than meets the eye. I work with these kids all the time and many of them have huge emotional problems - yet the doctor dishes out ritalin and concerta like sweets.

    I'm not saying that in your case there has been a misdiagnosis, just that too many kids are being labelled ADHD when their problems have origins in something else entirely.

    Thats not ignorant, thats being open minded.
     
  17. Useful posts, Mindful. The one thing that bothers me about all this is the underlying assumption that there is one standard 'model' of behaviour or indeed one standard, correctly functioning model of a 'brain' outside of which an individual can be viewed as 'abnormal' to some degree. I mean lots of the symptoms of ADHD seem perfectly understandable and 'normal' to me. My son was 'referred' to the SST in his reception year because his teacher thought he had ADHD. I thought he was perfectly normal - just intelligent (he could read before going to school), inquisitive and highly active. He was bored to tears! Sure, I've taught children with ADHD and they can be difficult, but I still think they are within the broad spectrum of 'normal'. What bothers me about them getting 'labelled' as ADHD is that they frequently grab hold of the label and use it as an excuse to misbehave and then claim they 'couldn't help it'.
     
  18. "ADHD is not a fancy label for naughty children or bad parents. All children misbehave sometimes and no parent is perfect.
    ADHD is a well defined and widely accespted medical condition. As with many medical conditions we don't know what the true cause is but we do KNOW that:

    * ADHD tends to run in families
    * The brains of people with ADHD are different form other people. Specific areas of the brain show differences in structure, metabolism and chemistry."
    (NHS 2005)

    Mechanica

    I agree that lay persons may well misdiagnose ADHD, but if you have been through the diagnoses process, particularly in Britain, you would know that to get a diagnosis is very difficult.

    Mindful

    "There is no conclusive evidence to show that this is genetically inherited."

    Yes there is, you just need to do some reading. Would you say that about breast cancer? Thats what I meant by ignorant....I didn't mean it in a derogatry way, I just meant that people don't know the facts which was the whole point of me posting the current information from the NHS here!
     
  19. rolls

    rolls New commenter

    ADHD describes a group of core symptoms -

    inattentiveness
    hyperactivity
    impulsivity

    Whatever you think about the medicalisation and medication of children I am sure that most of us have met children who find it harder to concentrate, have more energy and tend to do and say before thinking. Don't worry about the label but do recognise that there are children who face specific barriers in their learning through these problems as others do in learning to read or write.

    Whether medication is involved or not (unfortunately most discussion about ADHD seem to come down to ritalin) we do need to develop strategies to help these children learn.

    ADDISS is a charity set up by parents of children with ADHD. You may not agree with everything they say but please have a look at the websites recommended they are trying to help and are not in the pocket of drug companies as suggested earlier.

    I would also like to recommend a book - Supporting children with AD/HD by Kate Spohrer (Questions Publishing.)There are other good informative books on the market - particularly those by Finton O'Reagan and Paul Cooper, but this is unique in that it addresses itself to young people as well as staff. Ultimately young people need to understand their own difficulties if they are to manage them in the long run.
     
  20. 'Yes there is, you just need to do some reading. Would you say that about breast cancer? Thats what I meant by ignorant....I didn't mean it in a derogatry way, I just meant that people don't know the facts which was the whole point of me posting the current information from the NHS here!'

    So you call someone ignorant but not in a derogatory way? Thats ridiculous. The evidence is only conclusive in that certain behaviours are linked to certain brain patterns. I have read plenty on ADHD so don't patronise me or make assumptions about my knowledge just because I dare to float the suggestion that there may be in a link in many cases between ADHD type behaviour and environmental triggers, which incidentally might include diet.
     

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