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teachers with Aspergers

Discussion in 'Health and wellbeing' started by lucy miu, Sep 22, 2007.

  1. What is the best way to support a teacher who displays many characteristics of Apsergers. We have one at our school and he is being given a really hard time by other colleagues, including some members of the SLT? Does any one have any experience of this?
     
  2. What is the best way to support a teacher who displays many characteristics of Apsergers. We have one at our school and he is being given a really hard time by other colleagues, including some members of the SLT? Does any one have any experience of this?
     
  3. not directly.

    But if you consider Aspergers to be a disability, then it would be wrong to discriminate against him her on the basis of tat disability.

    Has he been formally diagnosed with Aspergers?

    You could ask Occupational Health to talk to him, perhaps?
     
  4. I don't think he has been diagnosed as having Aspergers and I would not know how to go about finding out. Occupational Health could be a start!
    Thanks
     
  5. I'd advise them that frying in butter with a little garlic was much tastier than boiling, which tends to remove quite a lot of the goodness.
     
  6. was that last posting supposed to be amusing or was it just typical of people who don't understand what they are dealing with??
     
  7. Leatherpatches. You will be sober in the morning,

    But the person with Aspergers will still have a Higher IQ than you.
     
  8. Lol wolf! ;)
     
  9. I find that more than a little demeaning to those with Asperger's to be honest.
     
  10. i think all maths teachers have aspergers
     
  11. Of course we do. Helps to have a south facing garden but you can manage from the supermarket if needs-must.
     
  12. Not all of them do, but my colleague does teach Maths!
     
  13. Talk to the guy! Say something like "it seems like some people get at you/I wonder why such and such said that" or whatever and see if he's actually noticed.

    He may, or may not, have a diagnosis. He may, or may not, *want* a diagnosis/label!

    He might just shrug and say "yeah I get that a lot, they're just nobs" or "what? I didn't notice" or "help, I just can't cope....".

    But talk to him, then if he wants or needs support you'll have a better idea of how to go about it.
     
  14. Still working with this person? Is he Aspergic? I have Aspergers and teach.
     
  15. Only Me

    Only Me New commenter

    Seriously, dealing with staff with mental health issues is a problem. Can I ask what has led you to write this post?
    As for staff treating person differently/badly - comes from fear and at times resentment. It may be politically incorrect - but all the same - a fact of life.
    Working with someone who is mentally ill myself - I find it extremely difficult - so much so, I'm looking for another job. No amount of research or 'understanding' makes it easier. I guarentee you I'm not nasty but sometimes feel really unfortunate to be in this situation.
     
  16. I'm going to take you gently to task here as Asperger's is categorically not a mental illness; from my point of view it's more of a difference than anything else, a different way of looking at the world and dealing with things. Just because someone has an ASD - especially in teaching - does not make them necessarily more difficult to work with than anyone else.
    If I am not Aspie then I would be very surprised - I have all the traits and my daughter has a diagnosis as well. I came clean to a very supportive member of SLT about a year ago who have been brilliant in so many ways, though I accept it was a risky move to take.
    The OP is some years old now, but I'd say actually, don't get involved. A diagnosis is just a piece of paper, and a limiting one at that in many ways (if I got one, I wouldn't want to be forced to disclose it on any applications asking about disabilities, for example). What webfoot said was very wise, and if I was in the situation, it's how I'd want to be treated.
     
  17. Anyone read that Kate Williams article in TES Features?
     
  18. Torey

    Torey Occasional commenter

    I'm not sure if you intend to come across this way, but it implies that it is ok to be Aspergers and not to have a mental illness. Personally I don't care what label people have, as long as they are nice to others.
     
  19. Sincere apologies for how it may have come across. I was responding to what I thought was an unkind post 15, posted by: Only Me 28/02/2010 at 21:07
     

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