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Teachers who work as Cover Supervisors are Scabs !

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by supplybychoice, Nov 24, 2009.

  1. supplybychoice

    supplybychoice New commenter

    Last week in the morning I got an afternoon booking for a school where I have worked many times over the years. An hour or so later the agency rang back and said they would only accept Cover Supervisors and asked me to reduce my rate which I refused to do. Half an hour or so later the agency rang back to cancel and told me that many teachers were now accepting work as CS's.
    Those supply teachers who accept work as CS's are f***ing things up for the rest of us. We should be sticking together and refusing to accept work as CS's as the NUT asked us to do in the summer. Supply teachers are stabbing each other in the back but i refuse to join in.
    If you are a qualified teacher and work as a CS then you should be ashamed of yourself and you must have no pride in your profession or dignity.
    Rant over.
     
  2. supplybychoice

    supplybychoice New commenter

    Last week in the morning I got an afternoon booking for a school where I have worked many times over the years. An hour or so later the agency rang back and said they would only accept Cover Supervisors and asked me to reduce my rate which I refused to do. Half an hour or so later the agency rang back to cancel and told me that many teachers were now accepting work as CS's.
    Those supply teachers who accept work as CS's are f***ing things up for the rest of us. We should be sticking together and refusing to accept work as CS's as the NUT asked us to do in the summer. Supply teachers are stabbing each other in the back but i refuse to join in.
    If you are a qualified teacher and work as a CS then you should be ashamed of yourself and you must have no pride in your profession or dignity.
    Rant over.
     
  3. Good point.
    It is unbelievable that schools will pay an adult who is not qualified, and indeed not allowed to teach just to save money.
    Think of the wasted lessons where children are unable to learn because they are under the supervision of someone who is unable to teach.
    Maybe this fad will end when GCSE results begin to drop and some bright spark realises why.
     
  4. Thing is supplybychoice, the agency maybe playing a negotiating tactic to get you in and your rates down.
    If the agency have so many teachers going in on CS rates then they do not need to call you.
    My agencies offer me CS work and I just politely decline. I am simply holding out as long as I can. In the secondary game all my work is a week here and maybe two weeks there. If I took on CS work I would be unavailable for the more lucrative and nowadays much harder secondary supply teaching jobs.
    Best try to be grounded with the schools and agencies. As for the teachers who take on CS work in secondary. Well some may see the light when they get their paychecks, and wonder what they are doing.
    Also if a CS is Pro rata and term time only. They will end up classed as I am, as a supply, a Term Time worker JSA wise.
    So they will have probs signing on in the hols, like a supply teacher has probs signing on in the hols particulary when they did as they did to me totalled my year hours up which were above the 16 hours per week for the previous year and refused to pay me JSA.
    Single CS's without a partners income will be in probs come July next year, their total years hours will be over 16hours however the dosh they recieved for this will not be as good than as if they did less work on higher rates as a supply teacher.
    e.g My gross income last year was 17000. My average worked hours for that year was only 18 hours per week. JSA said I had been a supply since 06 I knew the score I am classed as a term time worker.
    A CS will probably gross about 16000 grand pro rata and I think 16000 is top line. Their hours will be well above my 18 hours.
    They will be pushed to sign on in the hols. I hope they have thought of that before they take on the CS work.

     
  5. I do it, under the rationale that a day at £70 (in a nice school that is 5 minutes away) is better than a day at £0 because I am sat at home!
    My agency only pays £90 a day for teachers anyway. If I go in as a cover supervisor, they GET a cover supervisor (I give the work out and do my best to ensure they do it)
    So far this term, I have only had 3-4 days of teacher days, and 20 or so CS days.
     
  6. If you are not on direct contract with a school, keep an eye on your hours. If you are on direct contract and if you have a partner on good dosh well all sounds hunky dory. Get to know the JSA game if you are single . You may need to sign on in the future.
    I totalled my secondary supply days since sept. I have managed 30days well paid secondary subject work.
    Worked all last week at home now playing russian roulette with agencies.
    If I had gone CS I would have more days but far less money overall.
    Russion Roulette, Deal or No Deal, good luck with the supervizin! (spelling of supervising meant for a laugh)
    Ps, your agency sounds like a real ball breaker, hence loads of CS work!
    respect to you and only having a bit of a laugh to cheer myself up!
     
  7. podilato

    podilato New commenter

    I agree with the first post to an extent. I would definitely not work as a CS as it is one step forward, two steps back. However, I can understand why some people don't have a choice.
    What disappoints me is that most people think that the introduction of CS's is about savings. This is not the main reason. The primary reason is to destroy teaching as a career. Teaching has now been casualised where people will come and go, schools can employ anyone to do anything.
    Milton Friedman once claimed one of the biggest acheivements of modern capitalism is "worker insecurity". They have now just applied it to teaching.
    Schools and, in particular, Headteachers have always wanted the power to do what they wanted as far as staff goes. They have now been given that right. I was just talking to a colleague about the school his son goes to. A fellow parent complained about their child being taught by a CS. The Headteacher reassured the parent that the person in question was indeed a Maths teacher but was only being paid as a CS.
    How on earth is this been allowed to happen?
     
  8. And did the parent go away thinking "thats ok then"?
    Because of course if the person is payed as a CS then they are a CS not a Maths teacher. and they could have a phd in Maths, well done the person for fulfilling their duties as a CS.
    If they supervised the class well, then they have fulfilled their duties.
    Pretty lousy scenario, The person may be a great Maths teacher however, who can tell if they are being payed as a CS? they may have rightly chose not to give the full Maths teaching service
    and the ht s u c k s hiding behind ambiguity!

     
  9. I'm sorry, but picking on the victims of the policy is not the way forward.
    The guilty parties and main beneficiaries are those unions who went for increased membership over professionalism, the government starting down the slipperly slope of cost cutting and all those schools who have leapt on this particular bandwagon.
    The systematic rubbishing of supply teachers set the scene and compares to the fulsome praise being poured on their replacements.
     
  10. Looking at game plans, secondary wise. At this time of year it is normally full on, plenty of day to day. not at the moment. So I may as well forget it and leave it to the CS's and the teachers who are crossing the rubicon.
    In my subject, GCSE coursework plays a big role. Some of the schools and departments in my opinion have not been monitoring there GCSE work properly. This is not a speculative opinion. This is from being in schools this year and looking at coursework. I am not impressed at all!
    I normally pick up and engage GCSE groups at this time of the year. In the big faculties and big management which is rock and rolling at the mo, I really feel nobody is flying the plane.
    I expect a big crisis after christmas in schools regarding coursework for Easter deadlines.
    Looking at my combat record since September. I have averaged 1000 quid on my account per month from secondary subject supply. Working thirty days since September on proper rates.
    I am looking to hold out and get 10 days work until Christmas.
    If I go CS no way, it is still not worth it yet.
    However faculty leaders and managers regarding GCSE coursework be afraid - very afraid.
    As what I see in some of your departments you are right in it, if your school has taken a soft option GCSE coursework wise. (and stuck the head in the sand with YR 10&11)
    Catching up on Year 11 coursework is hard going, and if you want me to sort it out, you have to pay the rates.

     
  11. They will just do what one of my ex-schools did - cheat and falsify grades, give students words to copy into own handwriting, or if typed not even bother doing that.
    When I shopped the HoD and the other teacher in the Dept doing it to the Head I was told to shut up. I then got a lousy reference for blowing the whistle. Union wasn't interested (apparently 'no proof' as I didn't have conversations tapped!!), so what can be done.
    It's just an old problem getting worse. But when you introduce league tables and red tape over professionalism and society-led honesty, what do you expect? It's in all Gov agencies/areas and is only going to get worse imho - how bad it actually gets depends on when we implode.
     
  12. PS completely agree with the OP - and yes we can blame those 'forced to do so by Gov policy' - are the various people throughout history who pulled triggers to blame for other people dying? Of course they are - whilst if it is quite literally a 'you get shot, or you shoot him' situation it is understandable. This is nothing like that and anyone who thinks it is needs their head read. Yes, we are in an economic crisis, but everyone I have spoken to who has come out with the 'I can't get a job' line when pressed on where they have really looked can't get a job because they are only willing to x or y. When I couldn't get a job after graduating I accepted a contract to move abroad for 3 months (which I didn't want to) and then got a job in B&Q when I returned. I wanted to be doing my webstuff, but the market had popped and there weren't any jobs.
    No matter what your reasons, if you accept CS work, you are lining your own grave, and all of ours too. Full stop no excuses. As highlighted by the Maths teacher/CS story above.
    Shame on you. (shame that we will all pay the price)
     
  13. geffone, you are right. The fact is that during my day I had two double lessons and two singles in which in all of them I used my skill and expertise as a teacher to engage and teach classes in English and Geography, which are my subjects.. They definitely got their money's worth from me and as a supply teacher not a CS. They wouldn't have got this from a CS or anything like it. If schools want quality supply staff to cover absences they should be willing to pay the rates, however I don't think some of them realise just what the best of us do in classes. I was proud of myself today and I know the students were grateful. I think many of us supply teachers realise that we have to step up our game a bit, and maybe from time to time some aware people in schools understand this.
    The story about a CS doing long term cover on another thread should ring alarm bells for all permanent teachers, and for their unions. There has to be a limit somewhere. I don't understand how we have got to this situation where cover supervisors now seem to imagine themselves to be teachers. I didn't really mind the rise of the mum's army of teaching assistants but some of them have risen too high and too fast in my opinion.
     
  14. It is definitely a false economy to take work as a CS and although i can easily understand how tempting it seems if money is tight (we have effectively been set at each others' throats by schools and agencies, competing and fighting for daily assignments), we should not debase our profession, hard-earned qualifications and our human dignity by allowing ourselves to be exploited by greedy people. It will only store up trouble for us in the longer run, as it will allow schools and agencies to say increasingly in the future- 'well, you were willing to work as a CS before, why not from now on then?' As well as this, it will make it harder and harder to get a good rate as a supply teacher if proper daily supply teaching comes up. We must stand firm, present a united front and not start to undermine our supply teacher collegues- we've been undermined quite enough by unqualified cover supervisors, schools and agencies already. I don't mean to go on,(and i've said this before!) but 'united we stand and divided we will fall'.
     
  15. I was DISGUSTED when I found out schools were asking for cover supervisors. The only way anyone will stop this, is of parents are made aware of who is looking after their children. Parents have a lot of power these days and if they knew their kids were being baby-sat by non qualified staff,they'd be livid.


     
  16. As posted elsewhere, I am signed up to the refusing to work as cs work "alliance". The logic of accepting cs work to make present ends meet is short term, but I sympathise with those who feel forced into it. If forced into it now, I would suggest longer term plans to escape would be later looked back on as the right decision. Teachers are worth more. £50 a day, £9000 or so a year is not a career, or fair payment for the training done, It is not fair to the parents or children to make the value of the responsibility of teaching children equivalent to supermarket wages.
    If one future year the government wants to formalise extending the role of cs, and the unions finally try to make a stand, only to be answered with the fact that "actually most cs are qualified teachers anyway who are happy to do the work and accept the pay rate", it will be what the unions, (except NUT) deserve.
    Geffone, congrats on 30 days work. I used to get that, September for me was just 1.5 days, so even though work has picked up since, I'm far short of previous autumns.
     
  17. So we're back with the astaire position. Call the people forced into this situation scabs and defend the useless unions.
    How many astaire socks on this thread?
     
  18. supplybychoice

    supplybychoice New commenter

    I'm not defending the unions - they are doing absolutley nothing to help their supply teacher members.
    ButI still call those supply teachers who devalue their profession by working a CS's scabs !
     
  19. I tried airing this issue on Mumsnet and found less than an angry response. Some parents were quite happy about it! See if you can find the thread if it is still on there (my OP was pulled because they suspected I was a journalist researching for an article but I convinced them I wasn't by referrring them to this forum. Parents are not necessarily natural allies in this as they don't understand the implications.
    We're doooomed.....
     
  20. "Is your child properly taught all day at school?" is the thread title. Go to Mumsnet, find the topics list, click on Education and then find the above thread title. Over 100 replies so far.
     

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