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Teachers views towards Systematic Synthetic Phonics

Discussion in 'Primary' started by tomjoyce, Apr 2, 2013.

  1. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    so how do 5 year olds manage without learning long lists of words masha?
    Do you suggest I spend my time filling pages with stupid lists instead masha ?
     
  2. When does one letter represent only one sound, Msz? I can think of only 7 letters of the alphabet that consistently match to only one sound, and the sounds these represent can all (again off the top of my head) be represented by other letters or letter strings, according to the words they are found in. So much for simple. Do you mean, as I think palmtree is suggesting, that you should start with the most common correspondences? That makes sense. But it does not mean that moving from simple to complex makes learning any of the facts involved easier, does it? It means moving from common to unusual makes practical sense so that decoding specially written text can be facilitated . The whole system is complex, as you yourself say in an earlier post, so it doesn't actually contain any simple elements. It simply contains some more common and less common contingencies.
     
  3. Most 5-year-olds can only spell very few words 'correctly'.
    Filling them with stupid lists would be just as pointless as filling them with emoticons.
    Listing the words which all your 5-yr-olds have no trouble spelling would be interesting and helpful, especially if u also explained exactly how u teach them to do so.

     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    The emoticons make people smile unlike your lists masha
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    A piece of independent writing from one of my 5 year olds just for you masha (no words given and no topic or high frequency words displayed in the room) child's own spelling etc.
    One sunny day Alice was sitting on the grass with her sister when a little white rabbit hopt along.
    Oh dear I am going to be late.
    She followed the rabbit down, down, down thump! She was nearly to the center of the earth! Then she found loads of dors and next to one of them was a glass table. She tryed the key in all of them but non of them would open. Then she found a little dor behind a curten so she went back to the table and saw a bottle and it said drink me. Then she shrank. Alice saw a cake that said eat me in currants and she eat it and groo and groo until she was nine feet tall. She sat down and cried and made a pool of tears. Alice herd the rabbit and said excuse me! The rabbit dropt his gloves and fan. Alice was atill crying and faned herself and started to shrink.
     
  6. She's told you that quite often. She uses a systematic linguistic phonics programme. The programme teaches children the phonemes of English and how they are represented by a letter, or group of letters. Children use this knowledge to 'decode' words into their component phonemes and blend the phonemes, in order, to produce the 'spoken' (aloud or silently) word for reading and to break the spoken word into its component sounds and spell each sound, in order, for spelling.Teaching is systematic and works from simple to complex correspondences. That's how LP/SP programmes work.
    You are a bit wrong about spelling, Marsha. It's not a visual skill. It is predominately a kinaesthetic skill; muscle memoryof the unique 'feel' of each word becomes more firmly embedded with each repetition of writing the correct spelling. Extensive reading plays its part as familiarity with what a word 'looks' like enables a child to see if their spelling is correct. Extensive reading will also embed the correct spelling of homophones as children will be familiar with the context in which the homophonous word is used and so be able to choose the correct spelling.

     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I'm going to use standardised testing in spelling next term masha so I'll let you know the results.
     
  8. No doubt I will be accused of sour grapes, but I would think twice before adopting a method because people on Internet forums claim great success from it. Results need more analysis than that and it is not valid to generalise from one anecdotal example. So:
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Which is why we are measuring the impact on reading and spelling using standardised testing over a long period of time thumbie.
    [​IMG]
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    although in a term and a half we have seen an average increase in reading accuracy of 10 months and slightly more in reading comprehension

     
  11. Yes. But you are only one school, Msz. Even within that, it would be necessary to look at any other factors which might have an influence. This is what makes research into educational issues so difficult.
     
  12. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We are interested on the impact in our school but there are a number of schools providing data so don't worry
     
  13. Is there? Where will the methodology and results be published? What peer review process is in place? What is the control group? Please let us know when the study is complete.
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    As I said a longitudal study thumbie it's quite a long time before they leave Y6
     
  15. Never mind, I'm sure you'll still be coming on here 7 years hence. You can let us know then. Mind you, chances are something new will be flavour of the month by then.
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    We've taught phonics only for 20 years so don't suppose we will follow trends to keep up with fashion.

     
  17. I'm sure you have. Yet apparently you've had a recent improvement. Or have I got the wrong impression?
     
  18. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    As I have said we have adopted a new programme this year and want to monitor the impact, but you know this as you've mentioned it previously.
     
  19. I guess this was done by one of your better pupils?
    If they all write like that, then u are definitely a miracle worker.
    Nevertheless, the child's 'misspellings' show that learning to spell English would be much less time-consuming if it was more consistent (dor, tryed, curten, non, groo, herd).
     
  20. That's how all teachers teach spelling.
    U are contradicting yourself by first claiming that spelling is not a visual skill but concluding
    U make it very clear that it is simply down to memorisation, using every available help.

     

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