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Teachers not wanting to join in and play their part

Discussion in 'Primary' started by salix, Aug 9, 2012.

  1. Is there any truth in Cameron's accusation? What's your experience of sport where you work? In my PGCE barely any time was spent on PE, yet surely that would be the same for teachers in the private sector (or do they employ unqualified teachers who we've recently been told do a better job anyway?). It would seem that not enough time is spent on PE in primary school; in the schools I've worked in the statutory requirement of two hours PE per week has rarely been met (schools are much more concerned - scared - about maths and english results). Does anyone have any suggestions for levelling the playing field with regard to sporting achievement from state schools?
     
  2. Is there any truth in Cameron's accusation? What's your experience of sport where you work? In my PGCE barely any time was spent on PE, yet surely that would be the same for teachers in the private sector (or do they employ unqualified teachers who we've recently been told do a better job anyway?). It would seem that not enough time is spent on PE in primary school; in the schools I've worked in the statutory requirement of two hours PE per week has rarely been met (schools are much more concerned - scared - about maths and english results). Does anyone have any suggestions for levelling the playing field with regard to sporting achievement from state schools?
     
  3. We do two hours of PE every week without fail - one session with the teacher, one with fully qualified football coaches (PPA cover) and both myself and another colleague do a range of sports clubs over the year.
    As for the 'not enough time is spent on PE' comment - that is perhaps because we have too much to physically fit into the school day as it is, and coming from a church school where 2 hrs 30 mins a week RE is also statutory, it annoys me to hear people criticising teachers for trying to deliver (and deliver well!) an already over-stuffed curriculum into the already jam-packed school day.
    Mr Cameron and Mr Gove want to try doing our job before continuing to dig the boot in.
     
  4. Totally agree MissBlack about having too much to physically fit in the school day. Our school doesn't even meet its statutory RE time allocation - not church school. Maybe it's because it's a satisfactory school that priorities are so heavy on the 3Rs and not on art, sport and humanities etc.
     
  5. At my old school, we did two hours of sports a week (one session PE, one Games). If my PE got cancelled, I usually put it in some other time of the week, if at all possible (although that meant ditching French or whatever - I really haven't done French any justice last year, felt terrible every time I saw our HoD). We had sports clubs on at lunchtimes and after school. I did football, rugby, cricket and lifesaving last year, while one of my colleagues took the netball and did the lifesaving after school with me. And that was only one year group. The other years were covered by other teachers.
    At my new school, I'll still be teaching PE/Games (although I'm not quite sure how it's structured, yet) - it was one of the questions I asked before even handing the application form in. I've also been asked to take on the football and tag rugby (ok, no proper rugby, oh well) teams from the outgoing teacher. However, the problem I can see is how they are supposed to get to fixtures. At my old school, we used a bus. At my new one, parents are supposed to get the kids there and pick them up again. I can understand how that can be quite an issue.
     
  6. Slippersandagoodbook

    Slippersandagoodbook New commenter

    Pure deflection tactic from a PM whose first act when taking on the top job was to scrap the most successful school sports programme ever (SSPs).

     
  7. What was the programme?
     
  8. Slippersandagoodbook

    Slippersandagoodbook New commenter

    In a nutshell primary schools were linked to a local special sports college and/or sports clubs who supplied specialist teachers/coaches to come and deliver PE lessons and after school clubs. A local partnership development manager worked at the secondary school and organised local sporting competitions/taster sessions.
    One of Cameron's first acts as PM was to remove the funding, PDMs lost their jobs, and the whole system collapsed like a flan in a cupboard!
     
  9. SSP - School Sports Partnership
     
  10. MizUnderstood

    MizUnderstood New commenter

    Yup, used to work in a Secondary school that had 'Sports College' status and the SSP area co-ordinator was based there 3 days a week, the work he and his team were doing was AMAZING, providing the local area schools with all sorts of sporting activities and arranging countless inter school sports events...removing their funding along with allowing school sports fields to be sold off to developers just shows how short-sighted the coalition are. (As an aside I also got £0 bursary for being in the 11/12 cohort of trainees...thanks ConDems!)
     
  11. MizUnderstood

    MizUnderstood New commenter

    I think there may be some truth in the accusation for the two main reasons already mentioned, firstly, lack of training means people aren't confident enough, and secondly, other things always seem to take priority and PE is often the first thing to be pushed aside.
    I don't know how my PGCE provider managed it, because I was on a SCITT course and therefore spent a lot more time in school than most PGCEs, but I can hand on heart say that we've had fantastic PE training, I feel confident at being able to teach dance, gymnastics and games, we also had a separate certificated cricket training course. I think it's a real shame that other courses don't appear to offer the same opportunities despite spending a lot more time in seminars. I will be offering my school some lunchtime/after school sports clubs as I know they are lacking. We just all need to do as much as we can.
     
  12. In my area, the LA has managed to keep funding the SSP independently. The inter-schools tournaments inall sorts of different sports and events are hugely popular with children and parents, and are exactly the sorts of competitive sport Cameron pretends to support.
    Don't most private schools do lots of extra-curricular sports? I know several where an after-school/before-school sportingactivity is compulsory for all children. Also, many have a longer school day and so can simply fit more in than a state school can. Not to mention the fact they tend to have nice big playing fields/pitches/equipment and specialist teachers etc. All of which costs.
     
  13. zugthebug

    zugthebug New commenter

    part of cameron's accusation is that teachers are too lazy to run after school clubs and too scared to encourage competative sports. Firstly, i am a primary school teacher, i have 3 meetings afterschool per week and run an after school club on one other night. after school clubs are basically free child care, we have children who really don't want to be there and a range of ages and abilities that are impossible to tailor sports skills to. we aren't coaching specialists we are doing our best. every night i have a club or meeting until 5pm means an extra 2-3hours i have to work at home planning, marking and assessing the learning of my class so that the porgress can be good or outstanding in every lesson since satisfactory is no longer acceptable. if the government want PE lessons every day (something i have read in the paper today) then they need to pump some more money into primary schools so they can employ specialists and take the pressure off over worked staff who are juggling 10 subjects already. My school's budget in real terms is less than last academic year for the same number of children. Parents do their best to support but they are being squeezed financially and can't always afford to provide transport their offspring to other venues
    something needs to give, Mr Cameron, you can't keep heaping blame and pressure on schools without giving the financial and expert support required.
     
  14. I had one hour of PE training on my GTP course and I'm not particularly sporty, so I don't feel confident about teaching PE well.
    I can follow a scheme and, going into my 3rd year of teaching, I can put together some activities which get everyone moving, but I know that I am not teaching PE as well as I could with a little training.
    Last year, I led the swimming for the whole of KS2, without a single minute of training myself. I told the HT that I had no idea what I was doing and was told that there was no money for training and "just get them to swim up and down for half an hour".
    I agree that taking away the funding for the SSCos and PDMs was one of the worst things this government has done. I used to work in a secondary specialist sports college who used the money to provide excellent activities, resources and training for their cluster of primaries.

     
  15. This is all a storm in a tea cup.
    A knee jerk response to the olympics. I can guarantee that it will all be forgotten by party conference time.
    However i do think we should introduce SAts for PE[​IMG]
     
  16. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

     
  17. I get a little fed up by the constant pressure to squeeze even more into an already stuffed day. PE doesn't show up on SATs scores....end of argument. Having said that I really enjoy teaching PE as there's no marking :) BUT with Reception about 20 minutes tim is taken up with getting changed :D
     
  18. markuss

    markuss Occasional commenter

    But look how many medals the British Olympians won sitting in or on things. (Very expensive things.)
     
  19. Vanadesse

    Vanadesse New commenter

    During placements, we often didn't get in the full 2 hours, one would end up getting dropped because of time. We would always have at least one though. I'm really going to try and make the effort to make sure that I get both in though, think it' important.



    Though I find it extremely ironic to read what Cameron's saying about teachers whilst on the other hand reading this article that shows that he's sold off more than 20 school fields -http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-19162126



    Make your mind up Cameron, is school sport important or not?
     
  20. I wonder how many teachers don't feel confident about teaching sports they don't play or understand? Get in more specialist coaches and free up teachers to work alongside them. CPD!! I feel much happier teaching tag rugby after we had some coaches in to 'train' the children as I picked up loads of ideas about drills etc
     

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