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Teachers currently in South East Asia

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by GoldenBuddha, Aug 20, 2011.

  1. Hi there everyone,
    This is my first post but I must admit to having lurked on this forum for a good while now.
    Anyway....
    I am an NQT this year but taught on supply in one school continuously last year for a month shy of a full year. This school have now offered my a full time post. I am qualified as a secondary RE teacher however have been given a job in the prep school and so will complete my NQT year there. Prior to commencing my PGCE I was a non teaching Pastoral Manager for a year and am currently undertaking a Masters in Education.I am also an assessor for the Duke of Edinburgh's Award.
    I plan to leave for South East Asia at the end of the academic year. I was wondering whether anyone could give an informed opinion of whether my experience would be sufficient to enable me to be considered by the better international schools on the circuit. Also if anyone has any ideas as to what I can do to enhance my employability, extra curricular profile,courses, specific routes for the MA etc. please can you let me know by posting on here or PM'ing me.
    I would also like to hear from people who already work in S.E.A to gain their insight into the schools and any guidance they can provide on attaining a position/making myself as attractive as possible to International Schools. Or indeed if I do end up with more than one job offer on the table, someone to run the options by...(is this an exceptionally naive outlook?!?)
    My current top country choices are Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia (but I think you have to be 27 for visa requirements??) and Indonesia. To be honest I'm open to suggestions really. If anyone could help me at all that would be brilliant.
    Thanks in advance :)
    GB

     
  2. Hi there everyone,
    This is my first post but I must admit to having lurked on this forum for a good while now.
    Anyway....
    I am an NQT this year but taught on supply in one school continuously last year for a month shy of a full year. This school have now offered my a full time post. I am qualified as a secondary RE teacher however have been given a job in the prep school and so will complete my NQT year there. Prior to commencing my PGCE I was a non teaching Pastoral Manager for a year and am currently undertaking a Masters in Education.I am also an assessor for the Duke of Edinburgh's Award.
    I plan to leave for South East Asia at the end of the academic year. I was wondering whether anyone could give an informed opinion of whether my experience would be sufficient to enable me to be considered by the better international schools on the circuit. Also if anyone has any ideas as to what I can do to enhance my employability, extra curricular profile,courses, specific routes for the MA etc. please can you let me know by posting on here or PM'ing me.
    I would also like to hear from people who already work in S.E.A to gain their insight into the schools and any guidance they can provide on attaining a position/making myself as attractive as possible to International Schools. Or indeed if I do end up with more than one job offer on the table, someone to run the options by...(is this an exceptionally naive outlook?!?)
    My current top country choices are Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia (but I think you have to be 27 for visa requirements??) and Indonesia. To be honest I'm open to suggestions really. If anyone could help me at all that would be brilliant.
    Thanks in advance :)
    GB

     
  3. From the looks of it, your main problem is going to be that your teaching subject is RE. It's not often taught in schools abroad, and when it is, it's often dumped on whoever has free periods in his timetable. When positions do occur, you will be in competition with people who potentially have more experience than you, and who possibly have already the experience of teaching abroad. You should be looking at two things:
    1) get the experience of teaching a subject that has more appeal to schools abroad. Like you, I was teaching an unpopular subject at secondary. Eventually I managed to become a primary teacher which has opened a lot of doors (as well as it is being more fun - though harder work).
    2) target religious schools. They are a bunch of them. I was once offered a job in Taiwan which involved teaching French and Bible Studies. I could do the former but definitely not the latter, but this kind of positions might be more suitable for you.
    Otherwise, your other option could be to get married to another teacher! If you are part of a teaching couple, schools will be much more interested to offer you positions, even if you don't have the right background and/or experience (that's how I managed to move to primary, and how a friend of mine who is a PE teacher ended up teaching Early Years).
    All the countries you have mentioned are great and have their own upsides/downsides. The country is less important than the school you are working in.
     
  4. Hi, thanks for the reply.
    I will be in a KS2 post this year which will serve as my official NQT year. I was more wondering whether this would be enough experience to start applying for jobs abroad.
    Unfortunately I can't commit to marrying a teacher. I think my other half might have a few concerns lol. He is giving up his business in the UK to move away. A friend of mine got a job in an international school and her husband went with her to be the schools computer technician. Is this something that happens alot? If so, do you know if he needs to have actual qualifications in the field or does he just need to prove himself to be capable.
    GB :)
     
  5. Then you would definitely have more opportunities as a KS2 teacher. Nevertheless, keep in mind that jobs in good schools are more likely to go to more experienced people. You may have to settle for a lesser school. Which might turn out very well, but it may also turn out to be a nightmare. Believe me, there are few things worse than being stuck in a school from Hell abroad. You may want to stay for a few more years in the UK to improve your CV and your chances to land at a top school.


    Yes it does happen a fair bit. I can think of at least four people in my current school who got jobs as teachers, TAs or technicians through their spouses even though they may not have had prior experience or qualifications. But each school and each country is different. In my school, a willingness to roll up your sleeves and give it your best shot was enough for trailing spouses to get a job. And in this country, the visa rules are lax enough that it wasn't a problem. I am not familiar enough with Thailand, Vietnam or Indonesia to say what the visa rules are like, but they may be more strict and may prevent your husband from getting a job. If he can get a visa, it is still no guarantee that your school will be willing to employ him. It would be something you'd need to discuss during job interviews.
     
  6. Thanks for your thoughts and advice. It's always helpful to get an experienced perspective on things :)
     

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