1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Teachers applying for TA posts

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by ANNABEL39, Feb 9, 2012.

  1. Hi

    I went for an interview today for 2 posts. They were actually given to 2 teachers who applied for the posts as well. Is this common? Are teaching jobs in such short supply that they are going for TA jobs? Are there other reasons? I am slightly gutted if this is a common trend as not only am I now up against lots of other TA's (originally thought to be my only competition!!) but teachers also!

    Annabel
     
  2. Hi

    I went for an interview today for 2 posts. They were actually given to 2 teachers who applied for the posts as well. Is this common? Are teaching jobs in such short supply that they are going for TA jobs? Are there other reasons? I am slightly gutted if this is a common trend as not only am I now up against lots of other TA's (originally thought to be my only competition!!) but teachers also!

    Annabel
     
  3. bobbycatrules

    bobbycatrules New commenter

    Yes it is becoming more common. There are not enough jobs for qualified teachers due in part to support staff taking on the role of the teacher. The boundaries are becoming blurred.
     
  4. Don't despair though. Remember that TAs are more experienced in SEN and supporting students.
    I got my first TA job this year and one of the teachers let it slip that I had been the only candidate to be interviewed who wasn't a teacher.
    It depends whether the head wants a TA or a teacher on the cheap.
     
  5. Hope you don't think i'm being rude but in what way are TA's more experienced in SEN than teachers? In my experience there is no particular training for TA's in this area and sen are complex and wide ranging
     
  6. helpfulfriend

    helpfulfriend New commenter

    I was thinking that: there are specialist sen courses for t.a.'s but teachers also have training on sen and are ultimately responsible for the work t.a.'s do with all children sen or no.
    however there are a lot of experienced t.a.'s out there who often 'carry' less experienced teachers and then when we do a 'teachers' job for little pay we are derided - but that's another hot potato entirely!
     
  7. I was unfortunate to find myself redundant a couple of years ago - I had been working 1:1 with a SEN child who was going onto secondary. When I applied for that GTA & SEN post I was the only applicant with several years experience as a TA and this helped my success, the school in return supported my HLTA status so that when the contract was up I had increased my qualifications. Thus armed I attended interviews for several Cover supervisor roles, GTA and ATA posts and was rejected at interview as "the supply teacher already covering got the job" and "a specialist teacher applied and could really help with the PPA cover"and even "we like to interview other candidates but we use PGCE graduates who want a years experience". Take that to the union!
    It was disheartening but I helped myself by asking my then Head to shuffle my timetable and on the free Friday morning I ended up with I worked voluntarily at a local secondary school - they couldn't believe an experienced TA coming to work for free! It did help to be proactive and I am now a full time HLTA in secondary education, and being told I need to save up and do the PGCE by my new Head.
    Get out there and make yourself the best person for the job.
     
  8. The same thing happened to me last year. I had been supporting a child in the Foundation Stage 1:1 then the class TA position became available. The teacher supported my application and told the head as much. When the interviews came, there were 3 other TA's and 1 teacher. Needless to say, the teacher got the job because she had previously taught in the Foundation Stage. Her reasons for changing from teahing to support was the "work life balance" and she wanted her life back. OK that is fair enough, but how can a TA compete with that? The icing on the cake is that now, she is grumbling about the low pay - you can't have it all ways!
     
  9. Once upon a time there was something called Support Teachers, now that job is done by Teaching Assistants. Yet, unlike their job title states, they are not assisting they are teaching! The roles are not blured at all it is very clear. However as long as teaching assistants will do the job of a teacher for less money nothing will change. s for teachers applying for TA roles I would suggest it is because they get to do to spend more time doing what they were trained to do rather than drowning in paper work!

     
  10. I am sure many TAs would prefer not to be crossing into the role of the teacher. However many would argue that they didn't ask for that responsibility, rather it has been pushed onto them.
    The introduction of unqualified teachers (HLTAs/Cover supervisors) has blurred the traditional line between teachers and TAs and Headteachers have been quick to realise that this benefits them financially.
    As an individual TA in a school faced with a request from a Head (who you may respect/fear) to do some whole class cover you are either very brave (or foolish) to dare to say no. The current economic climate means that TAs are concerned about job security. TAs often say yes because they fear for their job and feel under pressure to please those in senior positions.
    In a round of job cuts we all know that the individuals who say no will possibly be first out the door. TAs are not clamouring to be 'mini-me' teachers, rather they are simply committed to their school and sometimes say 'yes' when they would prefer to say 'no'.
    It is often down to the 'culture' of the school as to how TAs are used. Each school is a little bubble with its own ways of using support staff and it is very difficult to go against the prevailing ways of working.
     
  11. What is best for the children?
    Should TAs be pressurised into taking on a whole class role on numerous occasions or should they be allowed to continue giving the more individualised help to individual children or groups of children all the time?
     
  12. VelvetChalk

    VelvetChalk New commenter

    This is a rather misinformed and incorrect assumption, all TT courses have many seminars and studies on SEN and inclusion, not to mention the fact that 'supporting small groups and individuals' is a huge section on our professional development as we train and as we progress in our career. I would go far to say that in some ways teachers are more qualified for both group work and SEN as they have done the thought and planning that goes into that group/individual and devise IEPs as well.
     

Share This Page