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Teacher shortage is getting worse, according to MPs

Discussion in 'Education news' started by MacGuyver, Feb 21, 2017.

  1. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    So, whose throwing teachers out with the bathwater? And what is the reason? Are they not delivering results? Are they weak in their subject? Is there high absenteeism? What on earth is going on?!? This state of affairs cannot carry on.........!
     
  2. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    One tiny group does not say much, true, although I would not say that gaining a 2.1 is doing badly. My dissertation itself was a first and I am very proud of my achievement. However, at our graduation only 20% of students got a 1st and that is out of all the different courses and universities altogether, so where is this 'grade inflation?' Real grade inflation would have seen at least 50% or more with a first, but it didn't.
     
  3. 50sman

    50sman Senior commenter

    The year I graduated with a 2:1 (1980) NO ONE achieved a first!
     
    Sally006 likes this.
  4. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    So how do OFSTED reach their objectives?
     
  5. Stiltskin

    Stiltskin Lead commenter

    Here is the increase in firsts awarded over the past 5 years (HESA data)
    upload_2019-10-8_16-14-12.png
    From 20-28%. In 2004 it was around 10% in 1994 it was around 7%.
     
  6. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    One bloke reckons I've done badly with a 2.1 so no different to doing badly in 1980!!!
     
  7. Stiltskin

    Stiltskin Lead commenter

    Are you a teacher? I'm intrigued by your lack of posting and suddenly posting lots of messages in a couple of threads.
     
  8. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    Hmmm interesting, so the increase or 'grade inflation' if you want to call it that either means tutors are giving out high marks for rubbish work or students are working harder? Well for my course the tutors marked strictly and fairly, so I do not agree that they inflated grades and the difficulty showed in the numbers. The first day the course began saw 28 people seated but at the first day of the third year saw only 7 people seated. So, three quarters disappeared. Is this due to 'grade inflation?'
     
  9. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    Hahaha!!! I am a trainee teacher and just graduated! I have been busy with my degree, that's why you haven't seen me! I am kinda catching up now on these interesting threads, certainly better than Facebook!!
     
  10. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    Since the post you quoted was from Feb 2017 you have the benefit of hindsight, so you tell me. I can't even recall the old thread title!
     
  11. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    We cannot afford to waste 13 billion now, when a recession maybe just round the corner........!
     
  12. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    Sorry, I realise some posts go back a fair bit, but this comment about teachers being thrown out with bath water is linked to a thread talking about shortage of teachers. It is a real shame that the teaching profession has been 'rubbed in the dirt', because there is nothing better than teaching others and helping others to achieve the same as yourself.
     
  13. 50sman

    50sman Senior commenter

    I don’t think I did badly in 1980. On my curse no one got a first in 1979 either!
     
    catherinedavid likes this.
  14. MrMedia

    MrMedia Star commenter

    They are much better students today I’m going to tell you. The journals are all electronic, the referencing is done by software, the learning is all blended with special support put into place for anyone with any issues on any area. The teaching is much better. The students are better self-regulated.

    The whole thing is light years from when we read our degrees.
     
    Stiltskin likes this.
  15. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

     
  16. catherinedavid

    catherinedavid New commenter

    Light years away? Really? Reference by software? Mine wasn't! I read books and online information and the books reference had to be spot on as well as ensuring you had the correct reference for anything online. Special support was only provided for those with a disability (nobody else) you had to get on with it yourself and discipline yourself. Many students were not self-regulated (whatever that means!) and the fact only a quarter of us survived proves my point.
     
    needabreak likes this.
  17. yasf

    yasf Occasional commenter

    "Self-regulated" describes a process of taking control of and evaluating one's own learning and behavior. Self-regulated learning emphasizes autonomy and control by the individual who monitors, directs, and regulates actions toward goals of information acquisition, expanding expertise, and self-improvement”
     
  18. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    Right i doubt much has changed since the last post... except schools are cash strapped, one way to deal with this is to fill vacancies with cheaper inexperienced teachers, some of whom may have capacity to do well and bring in some very good strategies however in some cases it leaves a relatively high staff turnover and an increase in many schools of teachers who are effectively learning on the job, I know we all do to some extent but the demise of external ITT specialist courses like the PGCE and BEd have left things a bit of a muddle. Couple this will the application of business strategies to what is essentially a not for profit sector and we have a greater muddle. Meanwhile we know that training and recruitment costs so in many ways this has been a false economy and staff retention should be a priority, hence the nature of much of this thread back in 2017.
     
  19. needabreak

    needabreak Star commenter

    I beg to differ. The number of student drop outs, break downs and resits that I have heard about recently indicate that students are poorly prepared for the independent learning required at university, of course this isn't particularly surprising as they are spoon fed GCSE and GCE material to prop up our grades while their experience of failure and the resilience that brings is limited.

    I am pretty sure the experienced teachers who post here should be making the policy not following the daft ineffectual diktats of those far removed from the classroom, who's key objective is to maintain their own organisational role... but alas we are busy effective individuals who still manage to contribute our thoughts and experiences here, for free to those who may be interested and able to implement a strategy that takes into account such experiences, we aren't career politicians and most aren't actually even career teachers... yes that was a thing a while back.
     
  20. tonymars

    tonymars Established commenter

    R they bovvered?
    Simples.
    Try listening to Cummings on how the Tories view the "poor".
     
    Shedman, sabram86 and JL48 like this.

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