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Teach Thailand after pgce, return to UK for NQT and stay

Discussion in 'Teaching overseas' started by homesickalien, Jul 30, 2011.

  1. Hi guys, I know there are many many threads on this subject but I just want to clarify as much as possible what the score is.

    I am going to do my PGCE Primary this September 2011, I then plan to teach in Thailand in October 2012 for a year returning to the UK in October 2013 to complete my NQT year. I know I should have ideally taught abroad before my PGCE or do it after finishing my NQT post but this is the situation at the moment.

    While in Thailand I don't want to teach in a international school, I am young and despite the low salary I am happy to teach in a Government school for a year whose only requirements is a Degree. I am not planning on doing any more tecaching abroad after this and plan on remaining in the UK and am fully committed to this.

    I just want to know:
    1) I wll be returning in October 2013, is it possible to start an NQT year in any term during the school year (say January or April) or can you only begin NQT in September?
    2) How will taking a gap year teaching in Thailand after my PGCE and before my NQT year affect my job application for an NQT post? Will it seriously impinge on my chances of a post or only to a small extent bearing in mind I I will be fully committed to the role.
    Thanks alot for any replies, really appreciate them :)
     
  2. Hi guys, I know there are many many threads on this subject but I just want to clarify as much as possible what the score is.

    I am going to do my PGCE Primary this September 2011, I then plan to teach in Thailand in October 2012 for a year returning to the UK in October 2013 to complete my NQT year. I know I should have ideally taught abroad before my PGCE or do it after finishing my NQT post but this is the situation at the moment.

    While in Thailand I don't want to teach in a international school, I am young and despite the low salary I am happy to teach in a Government school for a year whose only requirements is a Degree. I am not planning on doing any more tecaching abroad after this and plan on remaining in the UK and am fully committed to this.

    I just want to know:
    1) I wll be returning in October 2013, is it possible to start an NQT year in any term during the school year (say January or April) or can you only begin NQT in September?
    2) How will taking a gap year teaching in Thailand after my PGCE and before my NQT year affect my job application for an NQT post? Will it seriously impinge on my chances of a post or only to a small extent bearing in mind I I will be fully committed to the role.
    Thanks alot for any replies, really appreciate them :)
     
  3. Hey, I have just finished my PGCE and want to teach abroad asap so have researched the sort of thing you are proposing. However I have decided that doing the NQT year at home before heading abroad is a far better idea.
    The main reason is that going abroad then coming back makes it very difficult to get a job. You won't be here in August when NQT jobs start and anyway, you won't be able to attend the interviews in March / April. So realistically you will need to wait until August 2014. And then you will be competing against people who are fresh out of the PGCE, who will be aware of all the new strategies etc.
    Why not do your NQT first, go teach in an International School and make some decent money and then just see what happens, rather than planning too far ahead.
     
  4. I'd rather teach in a Government school for three reasons:
    1) It's more of an "experience" being the only Western teacher in a school with Thai tecahers and Thai kids instead of an international school which is largely like teaching in a British school.
    2) There are far more Government schools than international so getting a job is far easier and I have much more flexibility about location.
    3) The pay, about 600 quid a month aint great but does go pretty far in thailand, is alot more than thai teachers make and having a very high standard of living/lifestyle is not an issue for me.
    When you say people who qualify a year later than me will know all the new strategies etc is this really an issue? How much is really going to have changed in two years to what is learnt during a PGCE and how much will recruiters really care about this? I can certainly understand if there had been a gap of ten years but is two years much of an issue really?
     
  5. Not being able to start the NQTmid-year and having to wait till August is I agree an annoyance though. Is this definitely the case with NQT years?
     
  6. I agree that things won't actually change that much in 2 years but it may just make it that little bit harder to find a job here. I suppose it also depends how you are able to 'sell' your experience in Thailand - perhaps you will be able to convince an employer that it has made you a better teacher.
    Things are a bit different in Scotland - where I am doing my NQT year - but I know that here the only way to begin mid-year would be to get on some supply lists. However even that wouldn't be easy because, from what I understand, the supply lists completely fill up at the start of the year.
    One of my best friends did a CELTA and got a job in a govt school in Thailand for about 18 months I think. He had a great time and still lives there so while it would be fun, it's probably not the most sensible career move.
     
  7. Thanks for the reply. Is there much chance of getting a NQT job say
    in the month of January? Or is it something that is possible but
    rarely happens and I should accept that starting an NQT in August is the
    best time?

    Obviously my plan is not perfect, but I am
    committed to teaching and I really feel like I need to teach abroad at
    least once and don't want to leave it any longer than possible.
     
  8. roverfan

    roverfan New commenter

    Homesick, go for it!
    I taught for a year in Thailand (an international school tho, not a government one) straight after my PGCE. I returned home and started and completed my NQT year on my return. You can start your NQT year at anytime - you just need a complete term there for it to count.
    Lots of people told me to do my NQT year first but the job situation where I am is competitive so I started to look for jobs abroad when I was nearing the end of my PGCE. Looking back on it I have absolutely no regrets. My year in Thailand taught me to be resourceful, extended my teaching strategies and gave me a fantastic teaching experience. You just need to highlight the benefits of your year teaching overseas in any applications on your return - in my experience it accentuates my CV and definitely has not been a problem in getting work.
    I would add though that I tried to apply for jobs before I returned back to Blighty and it was a non-starter so be prepared to do some supply on your return until jobs start cropping up again Oct half term or December.
     
  9. qualiteacher

    qualiteacher New commenter

    You can start the NQT year at any time of year - just so long as you do three terms, it doesn't matter which three. You will be looking for January starts, though, as other people have said.
     
  10. thank you very much for the replies everyone![​IMG]
     
  11. Out of interest roverfan, can you tell me how you secured the international school position? Did you apply form the UK/reply to job adverts/use an agency?
     
  12. nemo.

    nemo. New commenter

    There seems to be a few misconceptions in some of these posts! Firstly you can start your NQT year in any if the three terms. The real issues is getting a job in primary considering they are hoards of trainees and few jobs. Also I STRONGLY suggest you do your NQT year first. One it's the most formative year of teaching and best done straight away before developing bad habits. Two if you go abroad you may get to like it and stay and best you have induction finished.

    Secondly you seem to believe that schools in Thailand are either government or 1st tier international schools full of British kids. That simply isn't true. Before I did my PGCE I taught Tefl in Thailand at a Thai private school after a state secondary school in isaan. The expat teachers were fully integrated with the school and all the kids were Thai (a few mixed and a couple of Indian expats and 99.9% Thai). You could try one of those. State schoos have 55 kids to a class, no air con, no fan, no resources, half the time no power and in a room meant for 25 kids you can't move! Yes it's an experience. But I do suggest as above either do it before your PGCE or after induction. And many teachers I met who went to Asia for a year end up staying 20 years! If that happens best you have done induction as more career opportunities. One thing 600 pounds is too low that's 30,000 baht. In Bangkok that's starvation level to be honest and with a PGCE a private local primary school will pay 60-65,000 baht minimum. Even in Tefl 50,000 baht min without a PGCE. Rural Tefl jobs in isaan start at 35,000 baht a month.
     
  13. Thanks for advice nemo esp. on govt/international schools. I know what you mean abouyt people staying 20 years but I've
    been to asia twice before and I know I get homesick so wll have no
    problem returning for at least a year to do the NQT
    Out of interest, how did you find this private school job? Was it on ajarn.com? Personally I only thought to teach Government schools (or tefl) because that's what seems to be advertised all the time on ajarn and they mostly all pay 30,000
    Of course I'd like a better paying job but there doesn't seem to be much of these 50,000 + a month jobs advertised. In your experience did you find many of these private school jobs around and with a PGCE are they easy to get?

     
  14. roverfan

    roverfan New commenter

    Sent you a pm[​IMG]
     
  15. hi, yeah tbh I've spent probably 5 months in total in thailand travelling round. Basically I just want to live somewhere there for an extended period of time, probably Bangkok so I get to know at least one place really well and vteaching of some sort seems the best excuse to stay somewhere a while. I just really really enjoyed my time in Thailand and S.E Asia in general.
    Is there really no chance of teaching in international schools coming straight from the PGCE Primary?
    Government schools look like the only option then, at least you can just sign up to a five month contract in case it turns out terrible. I'm under no illusions that working for a Government school I'm there merely to act as crowd control and to show parents that there is a Westerner working at the school.
    My major concern is how would future employers look at a year abroad with teaching which lets face it won't really be like teaching in Britain at all.
     
  16. Karvol

    Karvol Occasional commenter

    Imagine how it is getting a job now.
    Now imagine that the interviewer thinks that you have spent a year abroad on holiday earning a sackload of money doing nothing except partying and spending all day lounging on the beach.
    Good luck.
     
  17. This is it, but I can't help thinking great - get pgce, 26 years old, work in career til 68 years old. Over. I really want to do a bit more travelling while I'm still healthy and young.
    But I know it doesn't look great to a future head.
     
  18. wrldtrvlr123

    wrldtrvlr123 Occasional commenter

    Well, I can't speak for UK schools, but many international school teachers have an almost obscene amount of holiday time in which to travel (and many actually have the money to do so, with the school paying their rent and/or a yearly travel allowance).
    This year, we have 2 1/2 months for summer break, a 3 day weekend in Sept., 1 week in October, another 3 day weekend in November, 3 weeks off for winter break, back for two weeks and then another week off for Chinese New Year, 1 week off for Spring break and then 2 more days at the beginning of May for May Days.
    I feel almost guilty sometimes (almost [​IMG]).


     
  19. the hippo

    the hippo Established commenter Community helper

    wrldtrvlr123, is missing the point, perhaps. More and more schools in the UK do not seem to regard teaching in an international school as "proper" teaching. The "excessive" holidays that some international teachers have just makes things worse, surely? Added to that, there is the little problem of how one goes about getting a job in the UK when you are actually in Thailand or wherever. And UK heads do not seem to be very keen on SKYPE interviews.
     
  20. Hi Roverfan,
    I would be very much interested to hear how you found a job in an intenational school straight out of PGCE? My understanding was that you needed at least a year (or usually two years) experience before applying?
    Any advice would be greatly appreciated on this!
    Many thanks :)
     

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