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Tax question

Discussion in 'Pay and conditions' started by plumbj, Jan 4, 2012.

  1. A colleague of mine has recently used a company advertised through one of the teaching unions to claim tax back on her union subscription. She has had a letter from them advising her that she can claim back £3 per week for working from home for a maximum of 48 weeks of the year. Having done a bit of searching on the Internet I am not sure that she has been given correct information? Does anyone know anything about this - is it possible? Can teachers claim tax back for anything else?
    Thank you [​IMG]

     
  2. A colleague of mine has recently used a company advertised through one of the teaching unions to claim tax back on her union subscription. She has had a letter from them advising her that she can claim back £3 per week for working from home for a maximum of 48 weeks of the year. Having done a bit of searching on the Internet I am not sure that she has been given correct information? Does anyone know anything about this - is it possible? Can teachers claim tax back for anything else?
    Thank you [​IMG]

     
  3. DaisysLot

    DaisysLot Senior commenter

    As far as I know, having done this - self employed and used my home as my 'workplace' - teachers cannot claim this tax break. Their home is not their central place of work at all and so regardless of them 'working at home' or 'taking work home' they do not qualify to claim this.
     
  4. coppull

    coppull New commenter

    Suggest you speak to your Union,which will have a leaflet on this subject or check out one the three union web sites to download the information.
     
  5. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Teachers cannot claim the working from home allowance.
    Why on earth did your friend use a middle-man to claim the tax relief on Union subscriptions? Instead of giving the subs information to the middle-man, they could have simply given it to any tax office (with their NI number on the letter) and would have kept all the tax rebate. Why share it with an unnecessary agent?
    For those who haven't claimed tax relief before, the deadline is 31st January 2012 to lodge a claim for the 2005-06 tax year.
    If claming for previous tax years, you should also claim in the same letter for all the tax years to date. See the last sentence of this post.
    Telling them about allowable expenses for the 2011-2012 tax year will result in your current tax code being increased (and less tax being deducted in the first place).
    Claims for all tax years up to and including 2010-2011 will result in a refund, not a tax-code change, IF you tell them that you want the rebate back in a lump sum. I give them my bank sort code and account number. They can also send a cheque.
    Allowable expenses are:
    Union subs. Ask your union for a statement of historic payments and for what fraction of the subs is allowable. With the NUT, two thirds of what you pay is allowable for tax relief. With the ATL, nine tenths of the subs is allowable. With other Unions it could be a different fraction or even 100%.
    GTC fee. You can write a letter to the Inland revenue detailing the various GTC fees you have paid from the 2005-2006 or you can download Tax relief forms from the GTC website (use the search facility and print off a form for each tax year applicable) and send the complated form/s to the tax people. You can claim for the GTC fee even if your employer adds £33 GTC money to your pay (in Sept/Oct usually). That extra pay is subject to payroll deductions. Claiming tax relief returns most of the deductiosn to you.
    Act now or lose the ability to back-claim for 6 tax years. The Government are chainging the rules so that after 31st January (I think), you can only go back 4 tax years!
     
  6. Thank you to everyone for the responses - I thought it sounded too good to be true!
     

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