1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Talk for writing oral stories. Which do you use?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by yogagirl, Nov 28, 2010.

  1. yogagirl

    yogagirl New commenter

    Hi,
    I went on a course recently about talk for writing. The message was that learning a story orally helps the children's writing as it embeds structure and vocabulary which they can draw on when writing their own. I am going to give this a go but am struggling to find a short enough story that's suitable for year 4 that they can learn.
    Anyone done this before? Which stories do you use with your children?
     
  2. yogagirl

    yogagirl New commenter

    Hi,
    I went on a course recently about talk for writing. The message was that learning a story orally helps the children's writing as it embeds structure and vocabulary which they can draw on when writing their own. I am going to give this a go but am struggling to find a short enough story that's suitable for year 4 that they can learn.
    Anyone done this before? Which stories do you use with your children?
     
  3. Hi
    We use Pie Corbett for literacy and we always start with oral stories. This is usually a 5 sentence story using a story mountain e.g. Once upon a time there was a beautiful girl. One day she went for a walk, Unfortunately she fell into a great big pond. Luckily, a policeman was there and helped her out. Afterwards they went for a cup of tea and laughed about it all. This then develops by adding different bits in like adjectives, adverbs, sub clauses etc.. Also fairy tales are a good one to do orally. My Y5 class have done Cinderella ( after watching a story teller tell the story) and Robin Hood. We can spend 1-2 weeks doing this and it really makes a difference to their writing. Hope it makes some sense :)
     
  4. yogagirl

    yogagirl New commenter

    Thank you, that's a great help. When would you go onto longer stories such as fables? What would the progression be once they have their 5 sentence story? Would they be let loose to have their own or would they just innovate the model version? The course I went on suggest learning a page of story with symbols to help them remember. Then they would spend a few lessons boxing up the story and mind mapping using pictures. Is the 5 sentence story just the lead up to that? How long do you spend with the class on this before they learn a longer version?
    Many thanks, I appreciate your input.
    :)
     
  5. CB123

    CB123 New commenter

    Our school has just started using Pie Corbett too. I have bought a book which is full of stories ( I have the book for year 3 and 4) and the teacher manual. It has great ideas. A story my kids have really enjoyed is Matiwara's Name Game , which is an African version of rumpelstiltskin.
    We started by retelling the story lots and thinking about the different characters. We did character descriptions. Then the children created a story map, using symbols and simple drawings. This meant they were all (even my EAL and LA) able to retell the story without having the book - just by looking at the pictures. We then changed the 2 characters and looked at a new location and the children rewrote the story (obviously with support - a paragraph a day) floowing the same structure but with the new characters and location.
    All in all we spent nearly 3 weeks on this.
    The story map really gives the children a good structure for their writing.
     
  6. Hi,
    having seen the Pie COrbett stuff and loved it I have tried it in class. In Y5 we have an Anthony Browne unit and we mapped Through the Magic Mirror over about 3 days. The map helped us retell the story (with a copy of the book handy!) and the children wrote their own stories. They were 5 part stories too. They rehearsed them first and held one finger for each part of the story in the hope that it would be a memory jogger for paragraphs too. They made thier own picture maps but I really heard some of the phrases from the story when they were rewritten in the new stories. Great- am wondering which myth to do next term. Good luck.
     
  7. We do all types of story once they are secure with story mountain and 5 sentence stories. The storyteller books by Pie Corbett are good as they have CD Roms with storytellers on. The children love them. We have also filmed the children telling their stories ( using visualisers) and discussed the difference between talking on cmaera dn talking to a live audience. When they are developing their own story we use drama techniques such as hot seating a character and in talk partners they interview each other in character. All of this just gives them more ownership of their stories and characters. We also use fiction to write non fiction and the kids love it. Hope some of this helps.
     
  8. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Is there not a danger that all this embedding etc won't be incredibly boring for many children?
    My own feeling is that children, hearing loads of stories, start to see similarities between them and that this leads to a sense of 'story.'
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous New commenter

    Come on, inky! We can't have anything as reasonable and sensible as this. We have to have someone called Pie with his own bit of pie in the sky embedding things into children's poor brains like bloody magnetic chips in the X Files. God Forbid that they should just hear and read lots of lovely stories.
     
  10. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Oh let's start a revolt.
     
  11. inky

    inky Lead commenter

    Pardon?
    What a horrible, dry and joyless experience of story you are giving them. I'm appalled.
     
  12. We use Pie Corbett for literacy and we always start with oral stories. This is usually a 5 sentence story using a story mountain

    I've had some training on TfW and its my understanding that the children learn the text you are basing your unit on, not the story mountain plan. That way, the "magpie" the structure, vocab, etc from that, to put into their own. Learning a whole text by heart is one of the main principles of his work.
     
  13. We tell lots of stories orally 'talk for writing style' in year 1...red riding hood, the little red hen, three little pigs, the gingerbread man, Santa never forgets, the tunnel etc. The children love being able to tell a story without a book and live being able to tell their stories to other year groups. We tend to learn the stories during some of our story time sessions. We have found (and year 2 have commented) that the children use much more story language and better openers in their writing. We also feel that they have a better sense of a story as a whole. I dud some research into this as part of my MA and we found that some children's writing was a whole level better after using talk for writing and drama techniques. We read lots of other stories to the children too so I don't feel that the children are missing out on that front! Sorry for any mistakes, I am on my phone!
     
  14. yogagirl

    yogagirl New commenter

    I am just looking for books now. What are the exact book titles you bought? How long are the stories? Just seen some Dragonory books and they seem expensive....
     
  15. I bought Pie Corbett's storyteller books but didn't find them much help! I make up the stories myself!
     

Share This Page