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Taking a dog abroad on a teaching contract

Discussion in 'Teaching abroad' started by kristibunny, Apr 4, 2012.

  1. Hi, has anyone taken their dog abroad on a teaching contract recently? Our dog is originally from NZ and now we're living in the UK but considering teaching contracts abroad.
    Advice in terms of ease of finding accommodation, are schools ok about finding pet friendly accommodation etc
    In particular, anyone recently done this in Qatar? Other areas also of interest though, eg South America, Asia.
    Looking for recent feedback, last forum I found on this subject was 2007 and things have changed a bit since then in terms of animal transport, etc.
    Thanks!
     
  2. Hi, has anyone taken their dog abroad on a teaching contract recently? Our dog is originally from NZ and now we're living in the UK but considering teaching contracts abroad.
    Advice in terms of ease of finding accommodation, are schools ok about finding pet friendly accommodation etc
    In particular, anyone recently done this in Qatar? Other areas also of interest though, eg South America, Asia.
    Looking for recent feedback, last forum I found on this subject was 2007 and things have changed a bit since then in terms of animal transport, etc.
    Thanks!
     
  3. bigfatgit

    bigfatgit Occasional commenter

    It must be some dog if it got a teaching contract [​IMG]
    If it works for one year, does it get 7 years pay?
     
  4. Diddysan

    Diddysan New commenter

    I think it's interviewing for an assistant head position at my present school to replace the current B##tch we have!
     
  5. kemevez

    kemevez Occasional commenter

    If it's bite is worse than it's bark then it should apply for a headship yesterday.
     
  6. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    Teachers regularly bring dogs and cats into Qatar. Our teaching staff has at least one and usually two or three added each year.
    The requirements for Qatar aren't that bad, pretty similar to most other countries. You'll definitely need a recent certificate of health and proof of vaccinations. Get professional help to find out the specifics - this is not an area where you want to rely on strangers' advice on an internet forum. One missed detail and your dog could be rejected before it even gets on the plane.
    Qatar has a banned breeds list. I'm told there are some unexpected breeds on it, breeds you'd never think of as unstable or aggressive. Check carefully.
    I'm told there are vets clinics here that will assist you in making arrangements. Or you could use an agency in the UK. I suspect the ones here would be cheaper, and they'll certainly know more about local requirements.
     
  7. Hi, I brought my dog to Abu Dhabi on a teaching contract in September 2008. Easy to sort paperwork and vaccinations. Accommodation was tough to find cats OK but dogs a little more tricky. The main thing is the weather in these countries. In the summer months (April to November) you really need to ba walking it around 5am and again at 8pm with quick dashes out to the garden in the day (as long as you have a garden and are not in an apartment) The concrete will burn their pads. It is a huge committment to have a dog here as they are not accepted like other countries we took our by everywhere with us in the UK but here was so different. I actually turned a job down as they couldn't accommodate my dog as he was a family member and I wouldn't leave without him. My suggestion is if you have somewhere to leave it in the UK I would do that but if you don't and you do bring it then chose carefully where you go. Good luck I know what you are going through. Our dog was large breed (10 stone) and costs were unreal but worth every penny for us to have him here with us. XX
     
  8. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Mrs Hippo and I took Zoika, our little Fox Terrier, to Kenya, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Romania. However, we decided not to take her to Qatar when we first came here five years ago. Instead, Zoika went to live on my mother-in-law's datcha.
    Is it a good idea to bring your dog with you? Well, we loved our little doggie dearly and she gave us a great deal of happiness. Is Qatar a dog-friendly country? Definitely not and most teachers here live in apartments, not in villas on compounds. You can also forget about taking your dog for a walk in the park because it is simply not allowed. All of the parks in Doha have security personnel (yes, really!) and they would stop you as soon as they saw you trying to walk your dog. Another point to bear in mind is the happiness of your dog if he or she is left alone in the apartment for long periods.
    I have seen people walking their dogs along the Corniche. It is amazing how many expats just have to go up to the dogs and start making a fuss of them! If you were to get a job in Dukhan or Al Khor or ***, then you might be in a more dog-friendly environment, but Doha is definitely not.
     
  9. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    Hippo's reminded me of a good point.
    Check with your school before you come. If you're in school-owned housing, they might have their own rules about what's allowed. If you'll be in a rented apartment, you'll need one where pets are allowed, and that's uncommon. Not impossible, just uncommon. But, your school might not give you a choice about where you live, so if you're slated to be in a flat which forbids pets, you might not be able to bring your dog at all.
    For all pet owners, I really recommend bringing this up at the interview stage. It can be really heartbreaking when the conversation doesn't happen before a contract is signed, and then afterward the signer discovers that she has to either break the contract or leave the pet behind.
    I don't fully share Hippo's assessment of the situation here. I know many people with dogs, and they're happy. Dogs adjust easily; they prefer being with their people and don't care too much about where. If you're used to taking your dog to the cafe, that won't be happening. But there are places where you can walk your dog. If your dog needs tons of space to run free off leash every day, that would be an issue. If he can be happy with walks on leash in space that's not as green as back home, he'll be right. And you can drive him to the desert on the weekends for those off leash romps.
    In my compound, owners walk their dogs on the sidewalk, and dogs use the grass patches along the way for their business. Owners have to clean up, of course. Dogs are not allowed in the park.
     
  10. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    No, gulfgolf, most teachers I know here in Doha do not live on compounds and therefore your post is rather misleading.
    On weekdays, I leave my apartment at 6am and don't get back from school until 3pm or even later. This would mean that my dog (if I were to have one) would be on his or her own for an awfully long time, assuming that my wife were to work smilar hours. If you have a wife or husband who does not work or who only works part-time, then of course things would become more manageable.
     
  11. Thanks for the advice everyone... mirrors anything I've found so far - very mixed reviews re Qatar!! Anyone taken a dog with them on a contract to South America or Asia?
    Oh, and those that have taken dogs on contracts with them...eg, Qatar, is it hard to find good boarding kennels in the case of a weekend or week long break away?
     
  12. Mainwaring

    Mainwaring Lead commenter

    My two were born in Malawi and travelled with us to Ecuador, Malaysia and India. This was between 1995 and 2006.
     
  13. Diddysan

    Diddysan New commenter

    I've heard similar about Korea and China.
     
  14. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Oh dear. Yes, I was wondering how long it would be before someone made a joke about eating dogs. Canis canem edit. As to the earlier comment about boarding kennels, I would first ask other expats to look after my dog (if I were to have one). This is what we did with Zoika when we were in Bucharest. Another posibility is to ask the security staff at the school to look after your dog. Usually they are bored and do not have much to do, so often the security staff will be happy to help you.
     
  15. gulfgolf

    gulfgolf Established commenter

    Boarding kennels exist but you need to book holiday space quite early.
    Many people get help from friends, or have their cleaner move in to their house when they travel. The dog knows the cleaner, the dog gets the comfort of their own home, and the cleaner gets a nice place to stay and some extra money.
    Some people even have the cleaner come by daily at lunch to visit and let the dog out. I know several people who do that. Kind of like a dog walking service back home.
    Hippo and I are more in agreement than it might appear- if you take the view that so much depends on where you are living. And how creative you get.
     
  16. hi hippo

    i see you took your dog to kenya - we are considering this as i dont want to leave mine behind. looking at the web it seems possibe - how did you find it? was your dog happy? Thanks
     
  17. the hippo

    the hippo Lead commenter Community helper

    Your question has brought back some happy memories, moggins33. Yes, it can be done! Go to a vet well in advance of your travel date, to make sure that your pampered pooch has all of the necessary jabs and the expensive and silly bits of paper to go with them. Double-check with the airline re. Sky Kennels and so forth. Yes, Kenya is a very dog-friendly place. We had a villa with a large garden, so the aforementioned canine was very happy. Also Mwangi, our houseboy, took Zoika for walks every day and they became great friends. Mwangi also looked after Zoika, our little Fox Terrier, while we were away on safari, at the Coast etc. The bad news is SNAKES, so tell your shamba boy to be extra thorough and make sure that the garden is snake-free. Zoika decided to eat a snake one evening. That was serious bad news!

    Also remember that leopards regard domestic dogs as a yummy little appetiser...
     
  18. Thanks for the reply the hippo, think our jack russell would like to sample a snake too!
     
  19. Alphaalpha

    Alphaalpha New commenter

    It must be some dog if it got a teaching contract Big Smile

    If it works for one year, does it get 7 years pay?

    BFG - you have been quiet!

    We do dogs!

    PM me - Primary/music only!!
     
  20. epicrates

    epicrates New commenter

    I cannot believe that you are asking this question. If it is so important to you, then stay in the UK. Boarding kennels in an Islamic country? Are you serious? Have you not read about the appalling setup for labourers and maids in Qatar, let alone for dogs? It is likely that the world cup will be taken away from Qatar because of extensive inhumane treatment of people. Dogs are completely Haram in Islam, just like pigs and fish without scales. Make an effort to get some information about the country before deciding to leave your comfort zone in Britain.
     

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