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TA schedule, salary and conditions

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by cleo_tabakian, Dec 20, 2019.

  1. cleo_tabakian

    cleo_tabakian New commenter

    Hello, I am about to sign my first TA contract, starting in January.
    On the job advert it said:
    'This post if for 25 hours per week, term time only (39 weeks per year) – Fixed Term Contract for one year.'.
    When I went to the school with my ID documents etc, I have asked about a regular school day schedule and the HeadTeacher said it was from 8 am to 3:30 pm, excepting the TA to be there the whole time. I suppose that if it means I will work more than 25 hours/week - rather 39/hours per week...
    I don't know if I should ask the Head Teacher directly about this or not. Do you have any ideas?

    The Salary details are as follow:
    Scale 3 Spine point 5 £13,895 Pro-Rata based on 25 hours per week, term time only.

    Do you know roughly how much salary I will receive per month? I Found this salary calculator, I am not sure this is correct.
    https://www.thesalarycalculator.co.uk/prorata.php

    And will I have paid holidays with a Fixed-Term Contract?

    Thanks for your help.

    Cléo
     
  2. sunshineneeded

    sunshineneeded Star commenter

    Hi Cleo,
    I'm pretty rubbish at all this hours, conditions and salaries stuff - there are many people on here who are ace at it all! The salary they quote is probably for someone who works 37 hours a week, 52 weeks a year. So you would have to work it out for 25 hours a week and for term time only - that's 39 weeks a year, probably plus 4 or 5 weeks holiday - so will be 43 or 44 weeks a year. The salary they eventually arrive at will be annualised; that means it will be paid on the same day every month throughout the year, so you won't be without pay in the holidays. But sadly, it won't be anything like the original salary on the advert - it never is.
    You won't be paid for your lunch time, which I assume will be an hour. Even so, if you are working from 8.00 - 3.30 that will still be 6.5 hours per day which amounts to 32.5 hours a week.
    The person you will need to ask about all this is the School Business Manager - you might have met them when you took your ID documents in? There isn't anything you can do now that the holidays have started (Yay!!!) I wouldn't rush in too quickly with the questions in your first week - you need to wait and see how much you actually get when you're paid. The only question I would raise straight away is about hours - if you are only being paid for 25 hours a week and they really expect you to work the hours that seem to be suggested, that's not on. Most TAs work maybe 10 or 15 minutes extra before and after school (on some days) but it should not be an expectation.
     
  3. hubcap

    hubcap New commenter

    Agree with sunshine. Ask the office manager your hours on the first day. Yes you will get paid holidays but this will be in with your 44 or 45 weeks pay a year. Ask the office manager all this.
    Good luck and don't worry, the first week, finding out about everything is always the worst!
    So ask the office manager, what are my hours? How many weeks a year do I get paid? Then you can work out your monthly wage. Or if the office manager is really nice, you could ask her to tell you how much you will be paid per month.
     
  4. hubcap

    hubcap New commenter

    Oh and start as you mean to go on, don't work after your time or before it.
     
  5. hubcap

    hubcap New commenter

    Personally if it helps I think you will be on £9.00 per hour.
     
  6. marbles78

    marbles78 New commenter

    I'm a TA working 25 hours per week (8.30-1.30pm, no lunch break). I take home about £800 a month, after NI and pension contributions.
     

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