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TA behaviour management - disruptive pupils

Discussion in 'Teaching assistants' started by becswa, Jan 12, 2012.

  1. I am currently supporting a young year 5 boy who has behavioural and emotional problems. He often needs to leave the classroom due to his disruptive behaviour, but at the moment his home life is particularly bad and his behaviour is getting worse. He usually refuses to leave the class when asked, and before now counting down from 5 to 1 has worked and he leaves. However at the moment he refuses and it is only when senior staff come to remove him that he leaves. Just wondering if anyone has any tips about getting children to leave classrooms? He is always told that he needs to be responsible and remove himself and that it does not mean he is in trouble, but just doesnt seem to work anymore!!
     
  2. I am currently supporting a young year 5 boy who has behavioural and emotional problems. He often needs to leave the classroom due to his disruptive behaviour, but at the moment his home life is particularly bad and his behaviour is getting worse. He usually refuses to leave the class when asked, and before now counting down from 5 to 1 has worked and he leaves. However at the moment he refuses and it is only when senior staff come to remove him that he leaves. Just wondering if anyone has any tips about getting children to leave classrooms? He is always told that he needs to be responsible and remove himself and that it does not mean he is in trouble, but just doesnt seem to work anymore!!
     
  3. legoearth

    legoearth New commenter

    Hi,
    Silly question but why does he have to be removed? I work with year 6 and we have two boys that 'play up' refuse to leave the classroom and then go quietly for the male headteacher. It is always lessons they are not comfortable with. If there is one of the TAs availale to sit with them, they are fine. Attention given,fear taken away but they have not had to leave the lesson. If you know it's a difficult lesson for him give him a fun,quiet, related activity to do just until he feels confident and safe. Even some simple colouring activity at 'teach time' can help to settle and a lot of the time they are sill listening. Removal should always be a last resort. If it is a matter of leaving to calm down then there should be a something for him to do outside,we have another boy that has small squares of paper and does origami! He calms down and returns. Send him with a 'note' to another teacher or some other 'responsible' errand if you see a situation he may not be comfortable with. I can't give any tips on removing a refuser as we always always try to keep them in! Good luck!
     
  4. You need consistent clear rules with him. Perhaps a warning system. Verbal warning, name on the board, time out in class, time out out of class (perhaps in another classroom), sent to SLT member, Internal exclusion then external exclusion. You need him and his parents to agree to these sanctions. If everyone in school follows the rules then he will soon get the idea that there is no messing. He needs to know the consequences of refusing an adult. I understand the need to remove children from class who are being disruptive. It just isn't fair on the other children in class. Some of the things you could try is setting up a 'cool it corner' an area in the classroom he could be sent to if he is being disruptive. (this could be his time out consequence) Make sure you have a sandtimer in that area so that he can rejoin the class after he has sat there for 5mins or so. There could also be a reward system in place so that if he does do what he is supposed to then he gets a small reward. It might be collecting stickers, smiley faces, marbles or something else.
    Just sending a child out of class without clear warnings may seem unfair to him and you need to give him a chance to pull things back. The verbal warning then time out in class would give him those warnings. Every child is different but clear rules need to set in stone and everyone stick to them.
    Good luck
     
  5. Another thing you could try is working with him out of class in a proactive way. I don't know whether you have any ELSAs in your school but this can be very effective. Use some of the SEAL materials to help him understand his emotions. Give him some good attention and quality time maybe playing a game or just having a chat.
     
  6. He is usually removed from class for being violent, throwing objects around the room and in some cases trying to harm himself. He does have consistent rules. First a verbal warning, then if he is very disruptive he has "3 strikes" each time it is explained why he is having a strike. I think having some SEAL resources would work well, it is the occaisions that he is playing up for other disruptive members of the class that become very difficult as he will not settle at all and can be very loud and disruptive for the rest of the class!
     
  7. Why does throw? Is this because he has been asked to leave? To get attention or because he doesn't understand?
    I recently worked with a year 4 boy who was prone to disruptive and violent outbursts with often no warning. However I kept a diary and recorded the many 'triggers' that helped me recognise when things were likely to go wrong and believe me ,at first, they did. This may help you recognise the signs and give warnings earlier?
    Despite his issues I was able to quickly build a relationship with him based on my being firm, fair and consistent. Together we discussed CONSEQUENCES, impact on others, how we are perceived and want to be perceived. Your child clearly has emotional issues and as you have already said, delivering some SEAL may help. BY being his emotional support worker you will build a stronger relationship and he may listen to you more readily.
    Reading your comments I picked up on 'First a verbal warning then,if he is very disruptive he has 3 strikes'.
    I would suggest that this is too many chances?
    If these outbursts are a regular occurance and you are in a position to do so I would organise a workspace outside of the class when you can go after the teacher has introduced the lesson and explained the task. Leave when the work is to be completed and return to class for feedback/plenary. I did this and eventually the child stayed for longer periods and eventually the whole lesson. I'm afraid he was so dangerous/unpredictable at first we had to teach him how to be in the classroom.
    However if this is not possible (or unecessary) then I would discuss your expectation with the child and remind them of the effects on others (have you heard of Rights respecting?). Let them know that they are stopping others who find learning hard and or that they are putting others in danger.
    Ask them what the consequence should be. Let them know that leaving is a solution not a punishment - it helps everyone be safe, calm down and sort out problems. Add it to the class charter and employ the same rules to other disruptive members.
    When things go wrong and have then calmed down try a 'magic circle' - when you look at each stage of the problem : 1st I did this, then I received a warning - then I did.... - then I did...... etc. Actually draw it on paper and talk about where it went wrong. When it could have stopped. How to make it better.
    Gosh, I have rambled on and it's late. Hope it was helpful. It certainly refreshed it for me and a certain yr 6 I now work with!



     

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