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Synthetic v Analytical Phonics v Whole Word?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by 6pd4vjo, Mar 11, 2012.

  1. I am in an international school and we are analysing the use of a consistent program in the Foundation/Early Years for phonics. I have been researching synthetic v analytical phonics v whole word and am in the process of presenting my findings to the early years staff. According to the 7 year Scottish report (and some others), it should be synthetics ONLY initially rather than a combination of methods. Other reports say a mixture is the way to go but it has to be organised and not random.
    I am looking at Floppy´s Phonics v Phonics Bug v Jolly Phonics.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks.

     
  2. I am in an international school and we are analysing the use of a consistent program in the Foundation/Early Years for phonics. I have been researching synthetic v analytical phonics v whole word and am in the process of presenting my findings to the early years staff. According to the 7 year Scottish report (and some others), it should be synthetics ONLY initially rather than a combination of methods. Other reports say a mixture is the way to go but it has to be organised and not random.
    I am looking at Floppy´s Phonics v Phonics Bug v Jolly Phonics.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks.

     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    they are all synthetic phonics programmes ? complimentary programs
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    Our FS and KS1 staff all liked phonics bug the best of the three when we looked at them all.

    However our school have just bought floppy's phonics and we are using it (well SLT believe that we all are following it to the letter anyway!)
     
  5. I have a current project focused on Year 2 children categorised as non or near-non readers and who in their teachers views, are highly unlikely to achieve the governments 'expected' standard at Key Stage 1. The proportion of children in this category nationally is about 20% which is confirmed again at Key Stage 2. These children will have experience the same programmes which were successful with their peers.
    The project resources use the Perceptual Learning approach which provides an reading environement in which the children may learn all of the graphem/phoneme correspondences intuitively where specific phonics training has failed.
    The strategy involves a computer session which affords the children the opportunity to become familiar with the texts, followed quickly be a reinforcing session. After the computer session, the children are required to read the texts from a teacher's book to an adult. Following this, they are required to read the text prepared the day previously to ensure that they are not simply reading from residues in working memory which could in theory at least, take place when they read the texts prepared that day.
    The entire project consists of 90 daily sessions which take no more than a few minutes. The project has only been running a few weeks and will end in June sometime. The main measure for this limited intervention will be a comparison between predicted and actual Key Stage 1 outcomes. I personally favour a strategy based on Synthetic Phoncs supported by a Perceptual Learning component which will support those who fail to learn grapheme/phoneme correspondences by the conventional route.
    The early reactions from the 20 schools involved are very encouraging . I define Perceptual Learning as the exploitation of the brains' evolutionary programming which enables it to perceive patterns and relationships with the complex mass of infomation constantlly being received via the senses. I am running similar project on larger scale for children in Years 4, 5 and 6.


     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    nursery & reception Do you think your program is suitable Eddie?
     
  7. The resources being used in my Y2 project were developed in Year 2 classes specifically for Year 2 children. If I was a salesman flogging progammes for profit I might tbe tempted to claim that they could be used by any age group but I am not therefore I would never dream of making such a claim. This is a pilot project which is intended primarily to establish whether the not the resources can be used with the target age group which is Year 2.
    Participants completed a proforma containing the question "How many children in this category are you involving?" followed by the question "How many of these children are able to use the resource independently? Thus far, every one of the target childen is able to do so, which is encouraging. Another question asks "How many are able subsequently to read their texts to an adult reasonably confidently? and it would appear that the most are able to do so. The final question was "How many are subsequently able to read the text prepared the day previously? and this falls to about 90% I expect this latter figure to rise as the project progresses but time alone will tell.

     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I know yoprogram is for Y2 that is why I wondered why you posted on a about nursery and reception
     
  9. I regard the 'infant' stage of schooling as including Reception and Years 1 and 2. I do not regard this stage as the most critical in the literacy development stakes - that honour, in my view, goes to the childrens' own homes. It is in the infant stage that the formal foundations of literacy are laid - unfortunately they are also the stage in which the expectation of falure has its foundations and which can become ingrained and nurtured which of course, has a very negative impact by instilling a fear of making mistakes. This fear can only arise when 'rules' have to be learned cognitively or by rote. It cannot arise in perceptual learning where there is nothing to forget because there is nothing to remember - that is the strength of Perceptual Learning.
    The solution to illiteracy in the UK lies in the infant stage of school - anything done in later years is necessary 'remedial' and therefore limited in its potantial impact.
    There are a number of international schools all over the world which use my resources but since their students invariably do not have English as their first language, I do not base any of my conclusions on the results they achieve using the approach I recommend.
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Eddie the OP said Foundation Stage (nursery and reception) not infant
     

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