1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

SUPPORTING BILINGUAL LEARNERS

Discussion in 'Scotland - Primary' started by sus419, Jan 30, 2011.

  1. I have a child in my class who speaks very little English. We have no learning support in our school and i have exhausted all ideas I've been able to find. I'm clearly not meeting her needs effectively and need to find alternatives.
    Can anyone suggest ideas that they have tried to support bilingual learners or point me in the direction I could find some.

    Many thanks
    very frustrated class teacher!
     
  2. I have a child in my class who speaks very little English. We have no learning support in our school and i have exhausted all ideas I've been able to find. I'm clearly not meeting her needs effectively and need to find alternatives.
    Can anyone suggest ideas that they have tried to support bilingual learners or point me in the direction I could find some.

    Many thanks
    very frustrated class teacher!
     
  3. We had a large number of these children in our school and the guidance we were given by EAL staff was that they learn by osmosis! I don't know how long the kid's been with you but advice was to sit them next to an able student who can be a good classroom model and have other children teach them the basic vocab they need. There are also good EAL websites that they can work on when u r not supporting them. It is very frustrating when you cannot see progress and you feel that you are not doing right by them. The real problem is also how smart are they? Would they be struggling even in their own country. Hope this helps a little.
     
  4. Thank you, I think this child probably was middle to lower range of ability which doesn't help. I had been advised that immersion was the best thing for them it's just very frustrating, we have passed the trying to join in phase and now in a bit of a silent phase which i'm assured is normal but would be nice to see a glimmer of progress! I will persevere, thanks for replying, much appreciated.
     
  5. rednelly84

    rednelly84 New commenter

    Hi sus419,
    I teach a class of EAL kids in a school in the ME. The kids I teach are nursery age so came to me with very little or no English in September. In the beginning I used visual aids for everything, from labelling everything (even the pencils) in the classroom, daily timetable and basic instructions such as line up, sit down, stand up etc. I also kept the oral language very simple and repetitive. I was told by my HT to speak in full sentences to the kids (to model to them how to speak English), but I found they were completely lost so used a lot of broken English. It is only now I am able to speak to the majority of the class in full sentences.
    It is hard, hard work teaching EAL kids but I am finding it is really honing my communication skills in the classroom as I am so aware of it. Now some of the kids with a better grasp of English are starting to have conversations with me and ask me questions. It is so rewarding to watch every day now.
    Good luck and as you say, persevere. :)
     
  6. This site should give you everything you need! I use it all the time.
    http://www.ealedinburgh.org.uk/
     

Share This Page