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Support Plan Issue

Discussion in 'Workplace dilemmas' started by peersy, Jun 13, 2015.

  1. peersy

    peersy New commenter

    Hi have been on a support plan for the last four weeks as I have had an RI lesson when Ofsted came in. As part of this plan i have been observed every week for an hour a time. In my maths lesson observation yesterday the head suggested my lesson solving word problems with all four operations (im in y5) was too ambitious and the children were not sure what they were doing. However having marked this work 18 out of the 22 in the lesson have solved and answered the questions correctly, surely that must mean the lesson was good as they have understood through modeling and progressed to solving the problems themselves, have i got this wrong? is this not the purpose of a good lesson that they start at one point and end at another. She also wanted to know why it was all four when some could not carry out column subtraction which i covered this Tuesday-looking at their work again 25 out of 28 successfully completed this lesson too, I am going to show the head this work as i feel her observation is not a true representation of the lesson, is this the right thing to do?
     
  2. kittylion

    kittylion Senior commenter

    I thought Ofsted weren't grading lessons any more - have I got this wrong?
     
  3. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    I would say yes. Back up refutations with data.

    Don't let them grind you down.

    Mind you, if 18/22 completed the work successfully, they'll probably get you for lack of stretch and challenge!
     
  4. newposter

    newposter Occasional commenter

    I would question whether voicing an opinion is a good idea. Here in the people's republic of education it is unwise to question the benevolent father. Take your medicine and smile.
     
  5. GLsghost

    GLsghost Star commenter

    They'll want to know why nearly a fifth of the class couldn't do the work.

    Suunds worse put like that...
     
  6. scienceteachasghost

    scienceteachasghost Lead commenter

    . In my maths lesson observation yesterday the head suggested my lesson solving word problems with all four operations (im in y5) was too ambitious and the children were not sure what they were doing. However having marked this work 18 out of the 22 in the lesson have solved and answered the questions correctly, surely that must mean the lesson was good as they have understood through modeling and progressed to solving the problems themselves, have i got this wrong?

    The annoying thing with this is that we all know that a different Head would say that there is not enough challenge in the lesson!

    is this not the purpose of a good lesson that they start at one point and end at another.

    I thought so too, isn't that a form of differentiation?!

    Schools should NOT be doing capability on the basis of an OFSTED observation however. But then teachers have less rights than Victrorian mill workers these days...............
     
  7. ridleyrumpus

    ridleyrumpus Star commenter

    Quite apart from anything OFSTED make it plain when they come in that the feedback from any of their lesson observations must not be used for PM purposes.
     
  8. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide



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    It's in the Ofsted Inspection Handbook: "The lead inspector should meet briefly with the headteacher and/or senior leadership team at the beginning of the inspection to: ...... ensure that the headteacher is aware that Ofsted’s evidence from lesson observations, whether joint or otherwise, should not be used as evidence in capability/disciplinary proceedings or for the purposes of performance management."
     
  9. Piranha

    Piranha Star commenter

    They should never be faced with anything too difficult, in case it upsets them. Until they take the new GCSE and find they have not been prepared for non-standard types of questions.

    If it was as difficult as the Head said, and 18 out of 22 eventually got it, then I think that you pitched it about right, and the class have learned a valuable lesson about persisting even when they can't do it at first!
     
  10. CWadd

    CWadd Star commenter

    Piranha - indeed. Perhaps it should be pointed out to your HT, OP, that "resilience" is one of the big buzz words at present!
     
  11. NarnianRoyalty

    NarnianRoyalty Occasional commenter

    Have you looked at the OFSTED obs sheet for the RI lesson? That may help you get an idea of what slipped during that observation or what your HT is hoping to see changed in your lesson. I always requested mine from Estyn for my portfolio.

    Best wishes with the support plan.
     
  12. scienceteachasghost

    scienceteachasghost Lead commenter

    Namian - You are assuming that its the OPs fault they got a 3 - as we all know on here you can be the best teacher in Wales and if they want you out the subjective criteria can land you a 4.

    Pirahna - indeed - kids need to learn failure as well as success from an early age as otherwise they will be eaten alive by non standard GCSE Qs (which seem to be growing like weeds and rightly so I say!) and finished off by the often cruel outside world!

    Thankfully the Head and secondary I work in is massive on resilience education and the kids are definitely at an advantage for it.
     

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