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Supply teaching

Discussion in 'Jobseekers' started by BYusuf, Oct 3, 2016.

  1. BYusuf

    BYusuf Occasional commenter TES Careers peer advisor

    When does it pay to do supply teaching as opposed to having a permanent teaching role?

    Are there really any financial benefits to supply teaching or it is a myth?

    Do supply teachers have it easier than those in permanent positions?

    Please share your experiences and insights.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  2. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    I'm no longer doing supply, so current conditions may differ. However in answer to your questions, here are some of my own thoughts.

    When does it pay to do supply teaching as opposed to having a permanent teaching role?
    In term of financial rewards, never. Even working every day possible in the school year, will only mean being paid for 39 out of the 52 weeks in the years.
    However in terms of 'emotional' payment, sometimes people need a 'break' from the commitments of a full-time post.
    It is not advisable to rely on supply as a regular source of income and as many recent recruits to supply have posted recently , the 'waiting for the phone call to ring has it's own inherent problems.
    Ditto with Are there really any financial benefits to supply teaching or it is a myth?

    Do supply teachers have it easier than those in permanent positions?
    I would say that as most people on supply will tell you it is not easier. You often don't know the children/students, or the routines, behaviour policy and the students will respond to this and push the boundaries. The 'established' teacher often has fewer behavioural difficulties because they are a 'known figure' in the school, as teachers who move schools often find to their astonishment. Supply teachers deal with this on a daily basis with little opportunity to establish themselves.
     
    pepper5 and peter12171 like this.
  3. BYusuf

    BYusuf Occasional commenter TES Careers peer advisor

    Thank you for your reply, Laura.

    I asked my questions partly in regards to some recent posts about supply teaching roles versus permanent teaching roles and queries raised about this.

    I also raised this due to a colleague's recent supply teaching experience and how disheartened they were with the realities which did not match any of their expectations. They were equally frustrated when they found out that they were earning the lowest daily rate in comparison to other supply teachers doing exactly the same role within the same school.

    The point you made about 'emotional payment' may be the only aspect which makes supply teaching more beneficial on a short term basis.
     
  4. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    There is one 'positive' in that on supply one does get to see which schools one would not want to apply to, should a post arise.
    Experience in a variety of schools does enable one to decide which schools one feels would make a good match for oneself.
     
    install and BYusuf like this.
  5. BYusuf

    BYusuf Occasional commenter TES Careers peer advisor

    Very true, Lara.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  6. baitranger

    baitranger New commenter

    Most supply schools are depressing places . They have no proper desks for supply teachers and few chairs in the staff room for relaxation when possible. Pay for working in these pits should be much higher with special benefits whereas all you get is just daily pay, with NO sick pay, NO holidays paid, NO pension and NO security. Bad behaviour abounds towards Hapless supply teachers who are only doing their best under difficult circumstances, driving miles all over the country just for a loaf of bread to feed their children.
     
    pepper5 likes this.
  7. BYusuf

    BYusuf Occasional commenter TES Careers peer advisor

    Hi baitranger,

    The lack of security in supply teaching is a concern and can leave supply teachers in a vulnerable position, particularly if their schools are as unwelcoming as you describe.

    Following a recent chat with a friend, another concerning aspect is when some schools see colleagues in this position as 'just supply teachers'...
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  8. russysaccount66

    russysaccount66 New commenter

    I
    I am a teacher and own a supply teaching agency, this isn't necessarily true of all agencies. We have quite a few teachers who prefer supply and are totally doing supply out of personal preference. It just depends what your priorities are really.
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  9. silenceapres3

    silenceapres3 New commenter

    Hi BYusuf,
    Agencies are extremely exploitative and dismissive of the teachers' pay scale. My income halved when I did supply last year. Their daily rate is £110 (or £130 if you are in London) which if you get an average of three days a week work over 39 weeks in the school year, well, you do the math as they say! £12k a year is an insulting salary for a qualified teacher facing often very challenging behaviour and I would rather be penniless and unemployed than help line agencies' pockets in return for it! Remember, there is no access to the teacher's pension scheme when you work for an agency, a hidden loss. If you do want the flexibility of doing supply and can afford not to rely on a set income, decide where you are on the MPS/UPS, divide that by the 195 school days in the year and there is your daily rate WITHOUT any pension contribution. That's where I always started my negotiations. There is an excellent app now called Teacher In which puts you in direct contact with schools enabling you to cut out the middle man and negotiate what you want in this way. And if you find out colleagues are being paid more, your zero hours contract means you can renegotiate whenever you like as zero job security means zero commitment to a contract. Good luck!
     
    tonymars likes this.

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