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Supply Teachers

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mrjack, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. mrjack

    mrjack New commenter

    HI All,
    Do contracted teachers have any idea how much supply teachers earn ?
    If your UPS 3 you should be paid £195 per day. Depending on where you live if you work with an agency you are paid between £80-£130 per day for supply and you loose your pension.
    Is it not disgraceful ? why have the unions allowed this to happen ?
    I get the impression that generally teachers who have jobs don't know how much supply teachers are exploited.
    In Wales we are trying to do something about this, check out Supply Teachers in Wales on Facebook.
     
  2. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Looking at your posting history for the past few years, you have done well to get organised with references and be able to work either via an agency or directly.
    I can understand your frustration at earning less, but as there are now no national pay scales in England, schools can pay whatever they choose and it is up to teachers whether they accept or not.

    Supply teachers have always earned less than those on contracts when paid via an agency. The agency takes their cut and does all the matching schools to teachers bits and bobs for the money. No it isn't always fair and isn't always ok, but don't assume we have no idea. Many of us do.

    On the other hand when I'm out of school a teacher arrives about 8am, looks over the planning and resources which are all set up and ready for them, teaches my lessons, maybe marks some of them and then goes home.
    They do not have to sort out the fact little Jonnie lost his PE kit; Sarah's mother wants her to have extra homework which I either need to argue about or find some homework; the head wants a report on the subject I lead; another teacher wants me to observe them teach tomorrow; another teacher wants to rant to me about the fact the DH has observed them; Chloe has fallen out with Rhianna (again!) and both parents are fighting on social media and I need to arrange an urgent meeting to sort it out; reception classteachers are objecting to a new scheme of work and want to talk to me about it; etc, etc. Some might suggest I should get paid more to take account of all of these extras.
     
  3. Pomz

    Pomz Lead commenter

    We rarely use supply as generally classes do much better with a HLTA that actually knows them. However, where we have found a decent one or two, they have, in some instances, been paid nearly £200 per day (with the agency's slice to be paid on top of that).
     
  4. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    Caterpillar puts her hands over her ears in the expectation of an angry rant about schools not using qualified teachers for cover and so devaluing the work of supply teacher, etc, etc, etc.
     
    galerider123 and Pomz like this.
  5. CWadd

    CWadd Established commenter

    Not sure what you're trying to achieve by setting up a "Us vs Them" mentality here - its not helpful. Especially as teachers "who have jobs" do know how little supplies get paid, and how few benefits they get as well.

    However, those on day to day get to come in at 8.30 and leave at 3pm, without having to bother with planning or likely marking. Swings and roundabouts.
     
  6. Pomz

    Pomz Lead commenter

    Bring it...;)
     
    galerider123 likes this.
  7. shootingstars

    shootingstars New commenter


    No we don't come in for 8.30 unless we get a last minute call and I have never left at 3pm. Most of us do stay and finish marking the work that we have taught that day. We will sometimes have a day where we haven't got any support or told about basic information such as special needs or access to laptop. We have planning prepared incase there isn't anything left (without knowing the levels or previous knowledge of the children). If we find out we are covering the day/ a few days before then we will visit the class blogs on the school website to find out what the children are studying so we can plan relevant lessons. Please don't presume that we all just do the 9 - 3 that most people seem to think teachers in general do.
     
    thatmaninthehat likes this.
  8. modgepodge

    modgepodge Occasional commenter

    Look - I've done supply and I've done full time teaching and full time teaching is harder and longer hours and deserves more pay IMO. Caterpillar hits he nail on the head. Ok you might not be out the door at 3 but even if you do a week covering the same class (And I did that) you don't work as many hours as full time teachers.

    It's challenging in other ways - behaviour management, the unpredictable nature, but it's different. I used to argue against. HLTAs and support supply teachers but with a tricky y6 cohort last year, every time I left them with a supply teacher I would arrive back to huge numbers of issues, which weren't always handled brilliantly. I hate to say it, but it was more productive and less hassle to leave them with the HLTA. I am also aware of how little they earn. As an NQT 5 years ago I was offered £80 per day with one agency, and £95 with the other.

    As other have pointed out, there are no national payscales anymore and school's can pay full time teachers what they want. If fulll time teachers aren't being paid their full worth (and they're often not!) I can't see supply teachers getting much sympathy. Sorry.
     
    mbee1 likes this.
  9. Pomz

    Pomz Lead commenter

    Yes.
     
  10. Melj16

    Melj16 New commenter

    At this moment in time, I'm much happier getting £100 per day, working where and when I want, walking in at 8:30am and out at 3:45pm with no work, being able to switch off and go immediately back into mummy and wife mode, having my weekends free of work, having no stress, not suffering from anxiety.

    In my current circumstances with young children of my own, the drop in pay is absolutely worth while. I remember working in my full time, permanent role where all of the above was polar opposite.

    You have to weigh it up. You can't have the cake and eat it.
     
    Pomz and caterpillartobutterfly like this.
  11. mrjack

    mrjack New commenter

    It is apathy and lack of support from the likes of the responses here which is why the situation is the way it is, quite shocked actually that you would rather see an agency / fat cat director get rich whilst your professional colleagues are exploited and lose their pensions. Shame on you all.
     
  12. frustum

    frustum Lead commenter

    I think many teachers are well aware that supply teachers earn much less. That, and worries about finding enough supply work, is what keeps some people in permanent posts that are stressing them out.

    What exactly do you expect them to do about it? Even if they could persuade their schools to pay more, the net result would probably be loss of a teaching assistant, or fewer opportunities to go on courses or have time off timetable for particular tasks, because the supply costs would be too high.

    Unfortunately, budgets are stripped to the bone, and the market determines the pay. While the full-time job is so stressful that more and more teachers are quitting, there is a plentiful supply of supply teachers in some areas, some of whom are, like Melj16, happy to take the cut in pay.
     
    thatmaninthehat likes this.
  13. mrjack

    mrjack New commenter

    The unions think nobody is bothered, if teachers stuck together and told their unions how they felt about it maybe that would make a difference.
     
  14. lrw22

    lrw22 Occasional commenter

    In my supply days, I loved day to day supply. I certainly felt I was fairly paid for that. However, I was quite a popular supply teacher and the agency gave me lots of long term supply. I had to deal with lost PE kits, homework, planning, assessment, parent's evenings, the demands of ofsted etc all for the same daily rate I was paid for day to day. I think this is where supply teachers are ripped off and made to feel really undervalued.
     
    lardylady likes this.
  15. fionaB88

    fionaB88 New commenter

    I'm coming to the end of my first long term supply and won't be doing another one in a hurry.
    Love day to day supply.
    Long term is all the **** of a permanent job with non of the benefits.
     
  16. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    I don't think telling the unions the views on this thread would make much difference.

    And for a supply teacher struggling with the loss of income, union fees are often one of the first things to go. So even if unions were supporting supply teachers, too few are members to take advantage of the support.
     
    thatmaninthehat likes this.
  17. Pomz

    Pomz Lead commenter

    There is also the fact, that for many, having a supply teacher in the room next door just means a day of sorting out somebody else's chaos...

    I know there are some very good supply teachers out there, but the experience for many is a negative one - So many schools now just use HL/TAs instead - Saves a lot of hassle.

    This may, potentially, contribute to an apparent lack of universal 'support' for the cause...
     
  18. homeworkminutesablog

    homeworkminutesablog New commenter

    I agree with you too. I am also an e-tutor and deeply enjoy my this life. I am now a free bird though I am earning and can take care of my family in a pleasant way. This is really a boon for us to work like that.
     

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