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Supply teacher - being recognised everywhere / no privacy?

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by aquila83, Jun 7, 2011.

  1. Hi all,
    I am thinking of doing some supply work, but the thing that puts me off is basically if I start working for different schools, in a short amount of time, whenever I am around the town centre (I live in South London), i am going to start being recognised everywhere by all the 14/ 15 y old kids and that puts me off, since I am not even their real teacher, I was just a supply who taught them once a week sometimes.
    Has anyone ever had any problems with this?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Hi all,
    I am thinking of doing some supply work, but the thing that puts me off is basically if I start working for different schools, in a short amount of time, whenever I am around the town centre (I live in South London), i am going to start being recognised everywhere by all the 14/ 15 y old kids and that puts me off, since I am not even their real teacher, I was just a supply who taught them once a week sometimes.
    Has anyone ever had any problems with this?
    Thanks.
     
  3. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    No. Never. Not in 4 years. I think you are being over sensitive.
     
  4. BelleDuJour

    BelleDuJour Star commenter

    No. Never. Not in 4 years. I think you are being over sensitive.

     
  5. I used to work SW London. Many of the schools I worked in bussed the children in. So not generally in the area.
    Where I work now, another city, and I have worked in plenty of different schools in my area even some of my schools very local, still not a problem. Very occassionally I am recognized however it is positive and OK.
    However I have also been a 6th form tutor in a small town. How you react in this role when you are in the small town pubs, when your tutor group and their mates are on the razz, sometimes discretion is required.
    ignore them and go somewhere else.


     
  6. Generally you cover a fairly big patch anyway - but to the kids, unless you come in really really really regularly - you tend to blur into a general background of "teacherness" after a while and they forget you pretty quickly (or you'll get a vague "oh are you the lady with the cat with three legs" in the middle of the day when they remember you've taught them before - that one's usually what I get known for).
    I don't even get recognised in the local Tesco which backs onto a school I used to do a lot of supply at a year or so ago now (don't go there now because of agency issues and me dropping the agency that works with that school).
     
  7. I once had a child say to me 'I saw you buying wine in Tesco's' - that was only a mile from the school I worked at for a while. I once approched a girl in a shop and asked her to try on some gloves as she looked about the same size as my neice and she said 'hello miss!' - I hadn't recognised her - that was embaressing!
    Cx
     
  8. I've been spotted out and about by children I have taught plenty of times. Normally they are much more embarrassed about it than I am, and often they just stand there staring, shocked at actually seeing a teacher outside the classroom ;) I love it when they come in the next day excitedly saying "I saw you yesterday". My best comeback to that was simply "Yes, I saw you too" which left the poor child speechless :p
     
  9. Simple answer-dont teach. You we see the young people that you teach everywhere if you work local.
     
  10. You're right about students being more embarressed, KJLNZ. Two incidents from my childhood - a teacher saying behind me 'first sign of madness' as I was in a shop talking to myself, and walking along eating a Mars Bar and seeing my maths teacher amd smiling with a face full of chocolate - still makes me cringe!
    Cx
     
  11. My Dad actually got spotted by one of his students when he was on holiday overseas! I think my most embarrassing one was being spotted by a child I had taught while walking down the busiest street in town... I was walking along and she was in a car with her parents. She shouted "Hi Miss L" rather loudly as the car passed me - so many people stopped and stared as I waved back :p
     
  12. Yes, I have a problem with you decribing the role as "just a supply teacher". If you have that attitude do the rest of us hardworking and totally dedicated supply teachers a favour by keeping out of the pool.
    If you do the job properly it should be a pleasure to be recognised out of school.

     
  13. I think the 'just a supply' was referring to the fact that they weren't at the school on as regular a basis as a full time permanent teacher rather than negating the position of supply.
    Cx
     
  14. I've taught in many schools in my area and I don't see the children that much. When I do, they usually wave or say, "Hello." I don't think you can be a supply teacher and never expect to see the children you teach. I have reached the age where I see former pupils with their own children - that's life!
     
  15. I once had a problem with a fixing on a new exhaust pipe and returned the car to the centre without success. On the second occasion, I was served by a former pupil who said he would put double fixings on the pipe and I never had another problem. My double glazing was installed by the father of a former pupil and it's been trouble-free.
     
  16. "...Hey Miss/Sir you're a legend!!"
    F****** RIGHT I am. Much better than your normal teacher...!

     

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