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Supply in the primary school - Behaviour Management. HELP!!

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by Leanne1987, Jan 25, 2011.

  1. Hi everyone :).

    I completed my PGCE primary in June and have been working two days a week in a school about an hours drive from my house since September. In the past week, I have also started doing some temp PPA cover (Short term sick leave cover) in a school nearer to my house. Last week it was ok but today I really struggled - children talking over me, not listening, messing around and being generally defiant!! (Year 4/5)
    I feel like my behaviour management is slipping and I am getting quite disheartened.
    Has anyone got any tips for me? I would really appreciate it!!

    Thanks

    xxx
     
  2. Hi everyone :).

    I completed my PGCE primary in June and have been working two days a week in a school about an hours drive from my house since September. In the past week, I have also started doing some temp PPA cover (Short term sick leave cover) in a school nearer to my house. Last week it was ok but today I really struggled - children talking over me, not listening, messing around and being generally defiant!! (Year 4/5)
    I feel like my behaviour management is slipping and I am getting quite disheartened.
    Has anyone got any tips for me? I would really appreciate it!!

    Thanks

    xxx
     
  3. bigpig

    bigpig New commenter

    Don't worry, we all have days like that. I had a rather chatty class today.

    Can you find the behaviour policy of the school? Do they have a traffic light system for warnings or a name on the board? Some kids might not be interested in them but it should work for most of them.
    I've always been told to not talk over the kids, so if they start chatting amongst themselves then I was told to wait till everyone was quiet. Depending on the class depends on how long it takes them to realise you're not going to continue until they're quiet but it's worth a go.
     
  4. Lara mfl 05

    Lara mfl 05 Star commenter

    If it's week 2 the children are into the 'pushing the boundaries' phase. Maintain discipline as much as you are able,keep to thebehaviour policy, but it's not going to happen overnight.
     
  5. rewards, rewards, rewards. There are many you can use and the good thing is you can follow them through when you are there quite a lot. Either whole class or individual. I agree, find out what the class teacher does, ask the children and give them out quite a lot to begin with so it gets them on your side for small things and then they recognise that you reward good behaviour. Then slowly make getting one a little harder when you have got them where you want them.
    I outline my 'rules' at the start and clearly tell them what will happen if they follow/don't follow them and stick to this. Peer pressure is a powerful thing most of the time so I find table points work well or a whole class reward so they all get annoyed if someone is letting the class down. I put a tally of 10 mins on the board at the start as 'fun time' at the end of the lesson or golden time for younger ones. Then this gets rubbed off for minutes they waste. Always give children the opportunity to win things back otherwise there is no incentive for them to be good and they think you have labelled them as a 'bad' child.
     
  6. also, tap into what they like and let them do it when they are good. This tends to work for youngers mostly but can for older children if eager to help. Give the best ones jobs to do, let them go first for lunch/home etc. They will soon want to be on the list to go first.
     

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