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Supply in Manchester

Discussion in 'Supply teaching' started by 1cleopatra, Feb 12, 2012.

  1. Would like your opinions. I love teaching and have been teaching nearly 6 years. However, I have had a really difficult year and for my own sanity need to change schools. I have been working in the same school since qualifying but SLT have all changed since then.
    I am going to start applying for jobs for September but I am really considering (not a decision I have made lightly) handing in my notice at the end of this academic year. I have spoken to a couple of supple agencies and have said work is available (primary). I would be quite happy with minimum 3 days a week or maternity/ short term cover. Do you think that will be achievable? What is the reality of supply in Manchester at the moment?
     
  2. Would like your opinions. I love teaching and have been teaching nearly 6 years. However, I have had a really difficult year and for my own sanity need to change schools. I have been working in the same school since qualifying but SLT have all changed since then.
    I am going to start applying for jobs for September but I am really considering (not a decision I have made lightly) handing in my notice at the end of this academic year. I have spoken to a couple of supple agencies and have said work is available (primary). I would be quite happy with minimum 3 days a week or maternity/ short term cover. Do you think that will be achievable? What is the reality of supply in Manchester at the moment?
     
  3. Dunteachin

    Dunteachin Star commenter

    Read all the threads. Don't move until you have found another job. It will be professional suicide, most likely.
     
  4. Thanks for your reply. However if I don't find another job before September it might be suicidal to stay. Yes thinks are that bad!
     
  5. MrMercedes

    MrMercedes New commenter

    Hi,
    I live in Manchester, am primary trained and registered with 2 agencies atm. I am new to supply so unfortunately i can't tell you the situation over a long period. But over the last few weeks i could have worked everyday (on day to day supply).
     
  6. Thanks Phijames10 for your reply. I am going to phone some agencies up tomorrow and make enquiries. Can I ask if it was it a conscious decision to do supply work and how is the pay calculated.
     
  7. MrMercedes

    MrMercedes New commenter

    No worries. Yeah, I'm an NQT so doing supply for the experience and because there isn't many perm jobs around. The pay is per day and because i'm an NQT i'm on a cheaper rate - between £90-£100 a day. Perhaps i get more offers because i'm a bit cheaoer!
     
  8. Hi, I am only with one agency (I was thinking of signing up with more but I now have a FT fixed term post for April-July so am not going to waste any more money on CRBs). I have been on supply since the start of this term. For two weeks I heard nothing. The third week I had two days' teaching work. The fourth week I was offered two afternoons' HLTA work, and last week I had one afternoon's teaching work and was offered a further afternoon in a different school.
    I must also add that this amount of work has only been achievable because I'm willing to drive pretty much everywhere - Salford, Bolton, Wigan, even Chorley.
    I'm an M6 teacher returning after a career break, and my daily rate is £125 if teaching. However if they offer HLTA or TA work, it's an hourly rate - £10 for HLTA and £7.50 for TA.
    I too, after a long struggle of trying to return to teaching including too many perm/fixed-term job applications to count and not many interviews (advertising heads have advised they are getting 50+ applications per post) and leaving a permanent office job to do the TDA Return to Teaching course, would in no way recommend anyone who has a permanent job to leave until they have another job to go to in the current climate.
    However I can also sympathise with your situation, as it was in fairly similar circumstances that I came out of teaching in 2007.
    If you really feel you must leave, go all out to get that elusive job for September in the first instance and I really hope you get one - but also, make sure you approach supply agencies (I suggest at least two if you want 3+ days' work per week) in the summer term, as it takes almost a term to get all your paperwork and CRBs in place. Good luck!
     
  9. Hi
    Lady Valkyrie when you started reapplying for teaching post did they ask why you left a full time post? I'm hoping current head will give me a good reference. However, my main concern would be if I dont get that elusive job by September and start doing supply will it look bad that I have walked away from a permanant post only to start replying for another permanent position come September.
     
  10. historygrump

    historygrump Lead commenter Forum guide

    To be honest I am based on the outskirts of Manchester and the work is almost zero, they want support or CS staff, but work for teachers with the agency I am with is poor. This may be down to the agency, some have their favourites and they get work all the time, but for others it is dire. So I would hold fire for the time being, because a job is a job and use your present position to apply for other posts and get out of the school that way, because to leave and go on supply is sheer madness in the present climate of using anyone, but a teacher to teach and all you will end up doing is working outside education or signing on.
     
  11. Schools have not directly asked me that question though I do try to get it in the application these days that I came out to focus on family and that now my son is settled in school I feel the time is right to return. I have tried not saying anything and I have tried being completely up front and explaining my health was poor after my son's birth and the middle road of vague "focused on family" has worked the best in terms of getting me interviews.
    I didn't leave a permanent job - I was made redundant from my previous permanent job - so I could also quite truthfully say that the main reason I left my last job was it was temporary - but of course that doesn't account for why I then got an administrative assistant job and didn't attempt re-entering teaching for a couple of years!
    They asked on my RTT course interview and I was completely up front with them and told them the full truth. They said I was exactly the sort of person the course was for, someone who needed to build back up their confidence to re-enter the profession.
    I know this isn't what you want to hear, but I think you're right to be concerned on this point. It's always easier to get a job if you're in a job, and I know of several colleagues who have moved schools due to being really unhappy but have gritted their teeth and persevered with the original school until they had a new job to go to. It's fair to say that it's tough for experienced (expensive) teachers to get permanent work in the current climate as schools have to consider their budgets more than ever. Experienced teachers who are working elsewhere or on supply also have the added disadvantages of either "no recent experience" or "are they on supply from choice or because they couldn't get anything else?" I also think if you can't reassure them as to a genuine reason for leaving that doesn't make you look unreliable or weak, it lowers your chances, as the field for every job in the NW at present tends to be wide and strong.
     

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