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Summer Pay Question

Discussion in 'Pay and conditions' started by salindsey, Apr 3, 2012.

  1. Hi All, I am an American and have been teaching in England for about a year and a half. I am finding the pay system quite confusing and I am hoping someone has a minute to give me a quick explanation.

    When I taught in the US we had a choice to get our wages paid over 42 weeks or 52 weeks, depending on whether we wished to get paid over the 10 week summer holiday. If we chose the 52 week option, a small deduction was taken from each pay cheque which was then returned to us in the form of our summer wages. If we left early for some reason, we received the deductions in a lump sum on our final cheque.

    Recently some teachers told me that this was also the system in England, but my employer told me that that wasn't the case. That you only got paid for summer holidays if you had worked up to the last day of summer term. Last year I was on a temporary contract and left my position in late June. Should I have received the appropriate percentage of summer pay?

    If anyone could explain the system to me, that would be wonderful!

    Thanks!
     
  2. Hi All, I am an American and have been teaching in England for about a year and a half. I am finding the pay system quite confusing and I am hoping someone has a minute to give me a quick explanation.

    When I taught in the US we had a choice to get our wages paid over 42 weeks or 52 weeks, depending on whether we wished to get paid over the 10 week summer holiday. If we chose the 52 week option, a small deduction was taken from each pay cheque which was then returned to us in the form of our summer wages. If we left early for some reason, we received the deductions in a lump sum on our final cheque.

    Recently some teachers told me that this was also the system in England, but my employer told me that that wasn't the case. That you only got paid for summer holidays if you had worked up to the last day of summer term. Last year I was on a temporary contract and left my position in late June. Should I have received the appropriate percentage of summer pay?

    If anyone could explain the system to me, that would be wonderful!

    Thanks!
     
  3. Rott Weiler

    Rott Weiler Star commenter Forum guide

    There is no equivalent of the US system you describe but the actual position can vary quite a lot depending on your particular employment arrangements.

    Can you clarify:
    1. Are you working in state schools or in the private/independent sector? (There are national rules for most state school teachers but private/independent schools can have more or less whatever terms and conditions they want)
    2. Were you on a full time 'permanent' contract or only employed for a fixed period?
    3. Were you employed as a teacher or in a support role? Do you have UK Qualified Teacher Status (QTS)?
     
  4. Thank you for your response.

    I was working in a state school, on a temporary contract, as an unqualified teacher. I am qualified in the US, but not here in England.
     
  5. To add, although I am curious about whether some of my wages did not make their way to me, I am more interested in what the summer pay protocol is for state schools. Knowledge is power!
     
  6. frustum

    frustum Star commenter

    But remember that for permanent posts, the contract can only end at the end of December, April (with adjustments for Easter) and August, so the school will have to employ the teacher until the end of August anyway.
    The exception is maternity covers, which can end at any time - so the advice is often to ask for daily supply pay for the summer term. The system for that will probably intrigue you - the annual salary is divided by the number of teaching days in the year (normally 195, 194 this year), so that if a supply teacher is employed on every school day of the year, they receive the same as if they were on a contract.
     
  7. jubilee

    jubilee Star commenter

    Were you paid on contract terms or on daily rates? If contract, you would have received the same gross pay each calendar month. If daily paid, you'd have claimed monthly for each school day worked, and the gross pay would fluctuate.
    Daily pay incorporates pro-rata holiday pay.
    If on a contract that you leave before the end of the last school day, you do not get paid for the rest of the days in school (obviously) and don't get pay for the holiday thta follows that term or half term.
    If your contract would have allowed you to still be in their employment at 31st August, you would have received full summer holiday pay had you worked up to and including the last pupil day AND had given the appropriate notice in your contract to leave the employment as of 31st August.
    Maternity cover posts stipulate that you get paid until the day before the return of the postholder. The postholders, in such cases, normally 'return to work' / employment on the first day of the summer break, going back on full pay. The cover teacher, having worked all term, gets no summer holiday pay, unless they were employed on daily rate, in which case they'd have been paid for about one half term week and 3 summer holiday weeks if they worked every day of the summer term on the official teacher rates (qualified and unqualified rates).
     

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