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Suggestions for Year 4 reward systems

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by CookiesnCream, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. I'm an NQT who is inheriting a class who are highly motivated by rewards, mainly stickers. Although I taught Year 4 on placement, I didn't need to use anything more than the school house point system as the children were very independent and settled down well to work. I'm thinking of a reward system that links to our World War II topic, I'd be most grateful if you could share any ideas of what has worked for you.
     
  2. I'm an NQT who is inheriting a class who are highly motivated by rewards, mainly stickers. Although I taught Year 4 on placement, I didn't need to use anything more than the school house point system as the children were very independent and settled down well to work. I'm thinking of a reward system that links to our World War II topic, I'd be most grateful if you could share any ideas of what has worked for you.
     
  3. tamtams

    tamtams New commenter

    Hi, although i'm not a teacher (a SEN 1-1 ta) the class ta and myself arrange a raffle and buy the presents, tickets are issued for showing good behaviour, good work etc, the children that have earned the tickets write their names on them and they are then placed in a box and drawn every week. we have six prizes a week, this works really well for this year 5 class and does get them motivated.
     
  4. minnieminx

    minnieminx New commenter

    If they like stickers, then go with stickers. Quick and easy. If you want to link with your topic then have some kind of reward card/star chart that is on a WWII theme.

    I dislike raffles on the principle that you can be the very best behaved, hardest working child all week and get nothing. And, just to rub it in, you can watch the very worst behaved, least hard working child get the prize! I know several classes use them, but it doesn't sit well with me at all.

    Individual rewards for me are stickers. Class reward is a jelly bean each from the sweetie tin and a star on our class chart. 10 stars and they get an extra 10 min playtime. Seeing as they get about 10-15 stars per long term, you can see they don't get a whole heap of sweets and do have to work pretty hard to get that reward.

    Whatever you decide keep it simple and quick to administer. One of our teachers had a ladder to move children up during the day. If they got to the top they got a postcard home that day. Worked so well that it became unmanageable as it took far too long for the teacher to write the postcards.
     
  5. I think it also depends on whether the school has a particular reward system. At my school we have raffle tickets and 'privilege' cards. The children collect raffle tickets for good behaviour. The easiest way I found to do this was to have a clip board with a list of the children's names on and then just add a tally mark when they got a raffle ticket. I then quickly put the raffle tickets they had earned into their trays on a friday morning and when children came in they put their names on the back of their tickets after their name had been called on the register and put their tickets into a pot that the class had made. We had a whole school assembly where 2 children were drawn from each class for a prize. You could easily do this on a class level as well. If the children misbehaved they were given warnings. Each warning meant a different consequence up to the maximum of five in a day which would mean lunch time detentions and phone call home etc. The children all had their name on a card displayed in the classroom (I did mine on a washing line) and if they got more than 2 warnings in a week then they had to take down their card. At the end of the week, the children with their cards still on the line were put into a draw and 2 were chosen each week at random to have privileges. As a class at the beginning of the year we decided on 10 privileges. For example, being the first in line for the week, having a cushion on a chair, 5 mins on computer at end of the day etc. The 2 children that were chosen could choose 4 privileges they would like to have for the week.

    As someone else said raffle tickets are difficult because you may never get chosen even if you make all the right choices. Because of this during the last term I introduced my own little rewards for the end of the week. They were for things like 'most improved writer of the week'. Best mathematician etc. Children could choose a small prize or you could give a sticker. I have also found that table points work really well. You just have to be clear on what they get the points for and then say why you've chosen that table to get the point at the end of the lesson. For example, for stopping when you want them to straight away, all working really hard and staying on task.

    I think the key to rewards is to stick to them rigidly because if you don't the children will soon lose interest and they don't work.
     

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