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Suggestions for practical maths activities please!

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Louise1976, Sep 26, 2009.

  1. My mind has gone blank and I need some ideas for practical fun maths ideas for my SEN group of Y2/3s who are still working at EYFS level. They need to practise/consolidate
    counting up to 10+ correctly (1:1 correspondence)
    recognising/writing numbers to 10+
    I'd also like a few funky simple adding/subtraction ideas for groups to do with an adult.
    I thought of giving them cars and the garage and posing 'How many cars are still in the carpark and how many in the garage' types of question.
    Also, I've found the playdo mats on ********** where they can make amounts to match given numbers.
    I thought we could use dice to make number sentences or to play games-eg take it in turns to the correct number of bricks when you've rolled the dice-who's got the highest tower etc

    Could any of you wonderful EY specialists give me any ideas or point me in the direction of a website with such ideas to help a tired and weary teacher!!

    Many thanks!


     
  2. My mind has gone blank and I need some ideas for practical fun maths ideas for my SEN group of Y2/3s who are still working at EYFS level. They need to practise/consolidate
    counting up to 10+ correctly (1:1 correspondence)
    recognising/writing numbers to 10+
    I'd also like a few funky simple adding/subtraction ideas for groups to do with an adult.
    I thought of giving them cars and the garage and posing 'How many cars are still in the carpark and how many in the garage' types of question.
    Also, I've found the playdo mats on ********** where they can make amounts to match given numbers.
    I thought we could use dice to make number sentences or to play games-eg take it in turns to the correct number of bricks when you've rolled the dice-who's got the highest tower etc

    Could any of you wonderful EY specialists give me any ideas or point me in the direction of a website with such ideas to help a tired and weary teacher!!

    Many thanks!


     
  3. Ive got a document saved on my computer, can you leave your email address and ill pass it on.
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Some games and activities to help develop mathematical understanding and language
    Number recognition and counting
    • Use a pegged number line for counting, matching, missing number and jumbled up number games.
    • Make a moveable number line using yoghurt pots. Label the pots with numbers. Children choose correct number of objects to put inside each pot and place in order.
    • Make a vertical number line, using the children's handprints.
    • Make a tactile number line using materials such as sandpaper, fur, cord, velvet etc. for a multi-sensory approach.
    • Label attractive boxes with different numbers. Children place correct number of natural objects in each box e.g. shells, fir cones, conkers, feathers
    • Place a few wooden/plastic numbers in a feely bag. Can children pull out a given number by feel only?
    • Place wooden/plastic numbers in separate envelopes. Slowly pull them out one by one to reveal a small part of the number. How soon before the children can guess what the number is?
    • Hang number cards on a mug tree. Can children hang the correct number of objects on each mug peg? Use scrunchies, rubber bands, bracelets, curtain rings
    • Hang numbered pockets on the wall. Children place correct number of items in each pocket.
    • Thread correct number of cotton reels/beads on to numbered laces.
    • Hold a small number of marbles in your hand and slowly drop one by one into a covered container. Children listen carefully and tell you how many you dropped in.
    • Show a number of objects on the floor. Cover them up. Can the children remember how many?
    • Go for a number walk with a number card. See how many times the children can see that number e.g. on a bus, shop, menu, house, car
    • Go for a number walk and take photos of numbers in the environment. Make a display of the photos.
    • Collect examples of numbers on packaging, magazines, labels etc. from the environment and set up a display.
    • Stick a number on each side of a box/tin. Children clip the correct number of pegs to each side of the container.
    • Hide pieces from a number jigsaw around the room. Children have to go and find the pieces, bring them back to a central point and help put the jigsaw together.
    • Label bikes and create numbered 'parking bays'. See if the children can park their bikes in the correct bays.
    Music
    • Play musical instruments behind a screen a certain number of times. Can children tell you how many bangs on the drum, shakes of the maracas etc?
    • Play an instrument a certain number of times. Can the children play their instrument the same number of times?
    • Sing and act out number rhymes and songs.
    Sand, water and malleable materials
    • Find foam numbers in water or sand
    • Make numbers out of playdough
    • Draw numbers with fingers in shaving foam/paint/gloop
    • Catch given numbers of floating objects in nets.
    • Fill and empty a variety of containers (tall, short, thin, wide, large, small etc.) with water, sand or materials such as lentils and rice.
    Creative Area
    • Make models with different sized, shaped, coloured and textured boxes and materials.
    • Print with different shaped objects.
    • Collage large numbers and shapes.
    Cooking and snack time
    • Make number shaped biscuits
    • Stick certain number of currants/chocolate drops etc. on cakes/biscuits
    • Make a recipe book using pictures and numbers of cupfuls/spoonfuls needed for each recipe.
    • Make menus with prices, for the role-play cafe.
    • Cut up fruit into segments and portions. Talk about halves, quarters and shapes.
    • Encourage children to pour drinks for themselves.
    • Share out biscuits/fruit together with the children.
    • Count out fruit, biscuits, drinks
    Physical
    • Knock over numbered skittles
    • Throw large dice and clap, jump, hop catch ball etc. correct number of times
    • Throw correct number of beanbags into numbered containers
    • Jump along numbered carpet tiles in order from 1-5/10
    • Use large chalked shapes on the ground. Throw a shape dice, children run to correct shape. A harder version would be to add colours so children have to run to the red square, the green circle etc.
    • Throw correct number of quoits over numbered cones.
    Measuring and time
    • Draw round hands and/or feet and cut out. Use for measuring activities and games.
    • Give children a length of string, fabric or a ruler. How many things can they find that are longer/shorter?
    • Place some pegs in a line on a pegboard. Can children add or take away pegs to make the line longer/shorter?
    • Give children different sized containers. See how many conkers, cones, shells etc. they can fit inside them.
    • Use role-play to encourage the children to find things to fit e.g. the right sized hat, belt, bag, container etc.
    • Make a time line with photos of what the children do in the day e.g. register, snack, outdoor play ... encourage them to refer to it during the session.
    • Use a sand timer at tidying up times in order to help children learn about the concept of time.
    Shapes
    • Collect flat and 3D shaped items from the environment and make a display e.g. tins, food packets, money
    • Stick a large favourite picture on to a piece of card. Cut into two or more shapes according to the ability of the child and see if they can put the picture together again.
    • Carefully cut/break for example a toothpaste box, a flowerpot (watch edges) into pieces. Can the child put the item back together again?
    • Play with flat shapes on the floor and find which are the same and which fit together.
    • Cut sponges into different shapes and use to print shape pictures.
    • Place shapes into a bag. Ask children to pull out a circle, a square, a curvy shape, a straight shape etc. by feel only.
    • Go on a shape walk. Take a shape with you and look for that shape in the environment.
    • Use shapes freely to make own pictures and patterns.
    • Make shape biscuits.
    • Make shapes with playdough.
    • Mark out large shapes on the floor. Children run round to music and go and stand inside a given shape when the music stops.
    • Children march/dance round to music. When the music stops, they make a shape with their body.

     
  5. missjivebunny

    missjivebunny New commenter

    Msz I love your lists. I've just passed this on to my mum who teachers Yr2, she was asking me for practical ideas for her SEN children today and she says thankyou!
     
  6. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    She's very welcome
     

  7. Can I have a copy too please! Thank you. dandrjooste@bigpond.com.au
     
  8. Thank you so much for sharing all these ideas - I will be using lots of them!
    Enjoy half term!
     
  9. hi sounds super, can I hve a copy as well please my email address is sumadattani@hotmail.com.

    Thks xxx
     
  10. Hiya
    I am a learning support/ Classroom assistant and would love a copy of your document if possible. My address is
    kprice1975@googlemail.com.
    Would be very grateful.
    Thanks
    karen
     
  11. see above. its in the resource bank.
     
  12. Hi. Could I have a copy too. Just got a Reception Job and on the look out for new ideas.
    My e-mail 29trinity@talktalk.net
    Thanks so much!
     
  13. see above. its in the resource bank.
     
  14. Im a year 2 teacher too and would love a copy of the document you've sent others. Would u mind sending it to me too please , My email is marymichaela@live.com
    thanks

     
  15. Hi, your ideas are great and saved my life....i am currently doing my PGCE and was wondering if you have similar for other areas of learning. Thanks x [​IMG]
     
  16. schooluser

    schooluser New commenter

    Have you tried magnet fishing? put numbers on the fish- children put in order/ add up/ just count how many fish they caught... can be used for catching letters to make words with too (or words to make sentences with). Never met a child who is not fascinated by magnet fishing yet - and if you match the task right they are usually interested in doing it as a follow-on to the fishing. especially if they can put the fish back and start again afterwards. you can get proper fishing rod and fish set and adapt or use a small magnet tied on a string with paper clipped card fish. they could make the fish and write the numbers. they could make a certain number of fish. they could fish for paper fish with numbers and stick them in order.
    my year ones enjoy tracing numbers in coloured felts as a quickish practise. you can keep tracing paper as evidence practise and progress everynow and then.
    I put guide sheets with arrows and dotty numbers to write over in plastic pockets and they use drywipe pens to write on, then can wipe off. little and often is quite good.
    counting to 10 and estimating: I did this during walk to school month and within a week everyone, including the girl who could only count to 8, was making reasonable estimates to 20. Ask children to stand up who... (came by scooter but it could be is wearing a skirt etc) and tell them to sit down before the class can count them. Ask the class to make an estimate (sensible guess).Be sure to ask lots of people, esp the quiet ones, esp the ones who need practise, but also the ones who can do it. then ask the original children to stand up again and get a child who needs the practise to do the counting. repeat with another criteria. It was amazing the result. I'm going to repeat this with different criteria every now and then.

     

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