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Students paid to do lunchtime duties...what you think?

Discussion in 'Secondary' started by 911turbo, Mar 6, 2011.

  1. I wondered your thoughts on this; sixth formers being paid the going rate to do lunchtime duties at their own school. I don't feel at all comfortable with it.
    <font face="Calibri">In this present climate, with so many adults desperately
    seeking employment to support their families, I feel it puts a nonchalant slant
    on earning money; not to mention depriving employment seeking adults who would
    be very appreciative of such jobs, no matter how small.</font>
    I appreciate that some students have to work to fund their education but I am aware that students are being employed who receive the EMA for their educational needs already and I have personal knowledge that not even their EMA gets spent on what they need, let alone their wages. More so socialising, computer games, etc.
    Of course, some students have part-time jobs anyway, but I'm just not sure about in their own school?
    Plus I am aware that it was easy for students to get these jobs, which obviously doesn't exactly reflect real life.
    What happened was the school had lunch time staff and because of cuts, told them they would have to reduce their wages. The staff didn't agree and left. So the school employed the kids instead!There would always be someone in the community who would be very willing to do such a job but the school didn't want to do that.

    Additionally, though of course I understand students
    will eat, I'm not sure that eating earlier or later than lunch time is a good
    thing either for their health, and I consider that lunch time should be used for
    eating, talking to friends and perhaps reading/studying, not working for the school.
    This is just my opinion but I would really appreciate your views too. [​IMG]
     
  2. I wondered your thoughts on this; sixth formers being paid the going rate to do lunchtime duties at their own school. I don't feel at all comfortable with it.
    <font face="Calibri">In this present climate, with so many adults desperately
    seeking employment to support their families, I feel it puts a nonchalant slant
    on earning money; not to mention depriving employment seeking adults who would
    be very appreciative of such jobs, no matter how small.</font>
    I appreciate that some students have to work to fund their education but I am aware that students are being employed who receive the EMA for their educational needs already and I have personal knowledge that not even their EMA gets spent on what they need, let alone their wages. More so socialising, computer games, etc.
    Of course, some students have part-time jobs anyway, but I'm just not sure about in their own school?
    Plus I am aware that it was easy for students to get these jobs, which obviously doesn't exactly reflect real life.
    What happened was the school had lunch time staff and because of cuts, told them they would have to reduce their wages. The staff didn't agree and left. So the school employed the kids instead!There would always be someone in the community who would be very willing to do such a job but the school didn't want to do that.

    Additionally, though of course I understand students
    will eat, I'm not sure that eating earlier or later than lunch time is a good
    thing either for their health, and I consider that lunch time should be used for
    eating, talking to friends and perhaps reading/studying, not working for the school.
    This is just my opinion but I would really appreciate your views too. [​IMG]
     
  3. I don't think young people should be discriminated against because most don't have family to support or because they are young. Rather than putting a "nonchalant" slant on employment, I think any job exposes them to the responsibilities of having a job and the sacrifices entailed in holding one down. What they spend their money on is no concern of ours. Eating their dinner an hour earlier or later than they otherwise might is not going to damage their health. I'm bemused at how against this you are, the wide range of objections you give and I'm wondering what your real problem with it is.
     
  4. It isn't discrimination to want students to do well at school and not be distracted by a job they do there. It isn't discrimination either to be concerned for their welfare and to wish for them to enjoy the whole college experience of being sixth formers. I think it is important they learn skills for working too, but perhaps not when they are at school! This is where they learn, not work. That is my basic point. As to what they spend it on, I guess that depends on your view of the EMA really. As many of us teachers have discovered there to be advantages and disadvantages to it; many students attend college to claim their EMA and I think it is a bit concerning when they aren't even buying a pen with it! So I'm wondering why you are quite so laid back about the whole idea of sixth formers working where they learn!
     
  5. My discrimination remark was in reply to "In this present climate, with so many adults desperately seeking employment to support their families, I feel it puts a nonchalant slant on earning money; not to mention depriving employment seeking adults who would be very appreciative of such jobs, no matter how small."

    When I was a sixth former there was no EMA, I had left home at 16 and was living in a bedsit and funding my A-Level studies by working evenings, weekends and holidays. The opportunity to work lunchtimes at school would have been a far more efficient means of earning money.
     
  6. Well yes of course it would but this isn't necessarily the case for these kids! They aren't living in a bedsit trying to fund their education...well, none that I know of! And if they were, then I wouldn't be against it all. I think a scheme should be implemented so that it seeks out any students in such a position and then for them to have such a job but not for those who don't 'need' it if you know what I mean. It does not prepare them for the outside world as it is much tougher to get a job than just being handed it to them on a plate (well, they do have an interview, but you get my drift).
     
  7. Jobs aren't allocated on what a person spends their wages on. Some might need the money to buy their dinner with, others to buy a computer game with - neither is any of the employer's business. I agree that most students aren't in the same position that I was, in which case a "starter job" like this is a good stepping stone. There are the demands for time-keeping, appropriate behaviour etc whilst maintaining some element of familiarity.
     
  8. I agree with most of what you say; though I still feel it is slightly different because this is a school employing the students and as a result they have a duty of care towards their students. If it was just an employer outside, then I think it would be fair to say it doesn't matter whether that person needs the job or not but it would press on my conscience if, as a teacher, I had just employed a student to do lunch time jobs when I know he loves computer games and doesn't do a bean of work! Whereas I, as a teacher, would prefer to give the job to a student who is struggling because they can't buy certain books, for example. It just feels different because it is a school. I would be concerned of the job affecting my child's education, distracting them, as they are working when they are at school, not after or before school.
     
  9. ferrisbueller

    ferrisbueller New commenter

    How many sixth formers actually do academic work at lunchtime??
    We have Sixth formers doing lunch duties as support for the senior team. They are paid a small fee and given a small payment for lunch. It works effectively and gives them responsibility. It is also a good thing to put in their personal statements for uiniversity. One student got into the police force, with him discussing how he handled younger students.
    It is an effective use of school resources, and gives sixth formers responsibility. The added benefit is that they can empathise with younger students, and know who most of them are.
    Adult support from outside school wouldn't work half as effectively and wouldn't bother working for the peanuts we pay the students.

     
  10. Most of the cleaners at our school are 6th formers. We can't find anybody else in the local community willing to do it for the pittance we can afford to pay.
    They do an OK job.
    Most site litter is collected by miscreants, as the usual consequence is a lunchtime litter picking. We have a remarkably clean site!
    Warmer weather Headteacher's detention is often a site boundary litter pick.
    If I catch a student chewing gum in my room the consequence is to don the gloves and scrape the gum off the underside of all the tables in the room.
     
  11. Maybe I am a bit bias and all, being a sixth former myself, but I would love to have that job! It wouldn't take time away from my studies like my part time waitressing job does, and, as I'm planning to be a teacher, it would be good experience! Nothing wrong with teaching us the value of money and making us earn it, if we are actually doing a job. At least I would have weekends free for my studies that way!

    I don't get EMA, a lot of people don't, and next year the EMA scheme is being scrapped altogether. For most people it DOES pay for their education, in the form of bus fares to college, textbooks, revision guides, notepads, etc. I recently paid £18 for a revision guide, - out of my own pocket, because apparently my mum earns too much, and therefore obviously gives me £30 a week? EMA isn't really anything to do with having a job.

    And I'm pretty sure whether your lunch is at 12.00 or 1.00 isn't going to affect your health!

    I see it would be slightly strange for a school to formally being employing its pupils, but it is the sort of thing I would do voluntarily, so if my school were to pay me, I would take it!
     
  12. sleepyhead

    sleepyhead New commenter

    Many of our VI form students are employed as cleaners after school. One of my form even cleans my classroom, and there are no problems. There have been times when I have had to speak with student cleaners after school, but if that has been the case, then I speak to their supervisor and explain the situation.
    From 8.45 - 3.30, they are students. At 3.30, they become staff. The only time that there has ever been a problem was when all staff were invited to a post-Special Measures party and some teachers complained about the VI form staff coming... so they were asked not to.
     
  13. ferrisbueller

    ferrisbueller New commenter

    The school only pays the sixth formers a small amount for each lunchtime duty. If they don't do a duty, they don't get paid.
    We interview interested students, give training and also give added responsibility to two students who sort out the duty rota and arrange for the signed pay sheets to be given to the bursar so they can get paid each month. They are on the school payroll and have to sort out tax exemptions themselves.
    All in all, the students gain responsibility in dealing with younger students, assisting senior teachers and generally being around to ensure everyone is safe. If there is a larger issue then they are told to walk away or get assistance from a teacher by using the walky talky's they are issued with. This helps the school at a typically 'weak' time, when most staff are having lunch. It makes the school a safer place to be in, and also supports the more vulnerable kids. Some younger kids just like to talk to the sixth formers.
    It's nice to know that a student from another school thinks it is a good idea.
     
  14. I was employed by my school when I was in sixth form. We got the going rate plus free lunch (the free school meal amount) on our duty days, which was the same as staff. The school only employed 'dinnerladies' to serve food.

    It was good for my CV and many of my friends too, one friend used to check if someone was off ill and would do their duty as 'overtime'.

    I feel it was a good role in a similar vein to prefect but with more responsibility, we had to apply, interview, attend training in summer holidays and be CRB checked, although we felt that was strange. We were employed and paid by the LEA.

    It was a good use of my lunch break.
     
  15. madenglishgirl

    madenglishgirl New commenter

    We employ 6th formers for lunch and bus duties and the Y11 prefects also do a morning duty to sign in late comers and also lunch duties. I'm sure a couple of 6th formers also work as cleaners - I did when I was a student at my school and that was 15 years ago!
     
  16. Exactly what used to annoy my children; we earned too much but there was no way I was going to give my children £30 per week for going to school! They both had part time jobs and earned the money they used for their social life; many of their friends used their EMA.
     
  17. Why not I say.....................unqualified teachers teaching and taking classes. Let the students join the bandwagon who are we to have an opinion or a say.
     
  18. I have no problem with it in terms of the kids. They're on dodgy ground with getting rid of paid adults to employ cheaper kids, though.

    Having said that, when I was in the sixth form, the cleaners refused to clean our common room, so I volunteered to be paid to do it instead. I loved having a job, and the money and responsibility that came along with it!
     

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