1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Stripboard Circuits

Discussion in 'Design and technology' started by misspixie9, Mar 21, 2012.

  1. I've found a load of stripboard in the cupboards at school from old projects, and I'm just wondering if anyone's had much success using it with KS3 students? We don't currently run electronics/systems at GCSE, and it seems a shame to leave it lying around unused....
     
  2. I've found a load of stripboard in the cupboards at school from old projects, and I'm just wondering if anyone's had much success using it with KS3 students? We don't currently run electronics/systems at GCSE, and it seems a shame to leave it lying around unused....
     
  3. bigpedro

    bigpedro New commenter

    its quite useful for making strips of LEDs for projects but beyond that even my best students at GCSE struggled with the stuff.
     
  4. I thought that might be the case - I saw lots of panic moments with it at a previous school, but never tried teaching using it! Maybe I'll just use it to do my mock ups on for now!
     
  5. Was shown an interesting project at a CPD event at Edge Hill where they used stripboard. The spacing is just rigfht so that strips 1 and 4 fit into a USB to provide power to a project. You have to remove strips 2 and 3 to stop damage to the USB port.
    If you contact DigitalD&T they may be able to supply resources, it is something on my list to try once the GCSE hoohaa calms down.
     
  6. I cut it up into small pieces and use it for the students to practice soldering on,....before letting them loose on the real thing.
    I know its not a circuit but maybe keep hold of it as it can be expensive.
    Rob
     
  7. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    When I was a kid doing electronics as a hobby, it was all that was available. Again, in my first job doing R&D work, most of the circuits were built on strip board. It's great for learning which components connect to each other and which pins on the chips you need to use.
    If I was in your situation, I'd use it. Start with some simple circuits and clear layout drawings then work upwards. I'm sure if I could work out how to use it as a kid with no training, your students will pick it up as well with your help.
     
  8. You could try making some simple touch or moisture sensors to use with a transistor switch. This also doubles as a good starter soldering exercise.
    Snip off a piece containing four rows of copper and then bridge alternative rows with two short jumper wires. Use a couple of flying leads to then connect these pairs back to the base/power rail of the transistor circuit.
     
  9. re

    re New commenter

    I wouldn't use it with lower school to develop circuits. It's OK for modelmaker with an interest in electronics to figure out how to use stripboard, but you run the risk of alienating at least half your classes when their circuits don't work.
     
  10. I would not use Veroboard (as we used to call it) with KS3 at all unless a kid is very keen. Excellent for KS4 though, use in ResMat lighting projects, intro to ElecProd and Engineering.
    If you do use it you will need some 4mm drill bits with tape wrapped round as handles to clear gaps in the tracks. There is a proper tool but I can never find it when I need it.
    Definitely do not throw it away unless you want to throw it in my direction.
     
  11. modelmaker

    modelmaker Occasional commenter

    So what's the problem with working through it with them?
    Let's take a step back and imagine you have PCBs to hand out so the kids don't need to think about what connect to what and why. They just have to solder the components onto the board. Do these circuits always work as expected and never have any dry joints or incorrectly placed components?
    What happens then?

     
  12. re

    re New commenter

    But you are adding another hurdle for them to fall at. My point is that they need to make a working circuit otherwise they will be disappointed and not opt for your subject which must be the name of the game now.
     
  13. Thanks for all the responses so far - it's been interesting.
    For us at the moment it's a choice between stripboard, or soldering the components directly to each other. For now, we've taken the decision to start by soldering components directly, using wire to connect them, and will see how it goes.... If they cope well then maybe I'll use the stripboard with the more capable groups later on.
     
  14. misterroy

    misterroy New commenter

    We make a 555 flashing led with stripboard with s2, 13-14 year olds. Cut 4 tracks,solder in chip, LED and then electrolytic capacitor. Then I get them to think about where the rest of the components have to go and we follow a circuit diagram. They enjoy the soldering so much the ones that dont get their circuit to work dont care that much, and still want to do more.
     

Share This Page