1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Stressed NQT

Discussion in 'New teachers' started by tjteacher1, Mar 12, 2012.

  1. Currently in my second term as an nqt in ks2. I was recently told I am not on track to meet the standards, specifically to do with behaviour management. Since then I have constantly had people popping into my room or peering through my window. More than that I have started making uncharacteristic mistakes and forgetting to get things done. Every other day there seems to be a new criticism even though I am working really hard. Apparently nothing I do is good enough anymore and I have to force myself to turn up in the morning now. All I want to do is leave the school. It seems strange that only a few weeks ago I felt I was really improving and had lots to be positive about. I am planning to ask for early release but am scared it will be refused and things will get worse. I can't face the thought of going back after Easter. Not sure if there's anything else I can do but hope I am allowed to leave soon. Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.
     
  2. Currently in my second term as an nqt in ks2. I was recently told I am not on track to meet the standards, specifically to do with behaviour management. Since then I have constantly had people popping into my room or peering through my window. More than that I have started making uncharacteristic mistakes and forgetting to get things done. Every other day there seems to be a new criticism even though I am working really hard. Apparently nothing I do is good enough anymore and I have to force myself to turn up in the morning now. All I want to do is leave the school. It seems strange that only a few weeks ago I felt I was really improving and had lots to be positive about. I am planning to ask for early release but am scared it will be refused and things will get worse. I can't face the thought of going back after Easter. Not sure if there's anything else I can do but hope I am allowed to leave soon. Any advice or suggestions would be appreciated.
     
  3. You've got to harden up and think: what am I getting out of this experience for me? If it's something you need to do in order to get the induction done, then do it. Grit your teeth. What I find helps me when I feel anxious is to write down lists of all the things that I need to get done. If you find yourself forgetting things uncharacteristically then that is worry affecting you. Put alarms on your phone and leave notes for yourself to remind yourself of things. You have to be selfish and do what it takes to get through. Don't worry about those *** peering through windows. They've obviously got nothing better to do - can't stand nosy jobsworths myself. Just think, when you've finished the NQT year, you can kiss them goodbye and go and work in a nicer school. Definitely go to whoever told you you're not meeting the standards and bring a notepad. Ask them how exactly you can meet the standards and jot down notes. Quiz them in detail. Don't let them away with anything. Then, go about achieving those standards systematically. Don't ask for early release - brazen it out. People like that want to see you fail. Don't let them see it happen. Defy them.
     
  4. If the school is saying you are not on track they should be sitting down with you to create a plan of action to tackle the issues and, if necessary seek out extra help and training for you. Simply 'popping in' is of no practical use to you. There should be a planb with targets that have agreed outcomes and success criteria which let you and the school know if you are or are not progressing. The judgement shjould also be backed by the head and the LA should also be involved to offer further support. I would suggest that you ask your mentor to set aside time for a meeting so that such a plan can be formulated. If all the ti8me you are stressed about if/when people may 'pop in' then that will not make you any better at behaviour management. You need to talk to others look at the practice of others gain help from experienced staff and be allowed room to try out things in your own class.
    The Sage
     
  5. OK, the advice you've already got to make them state exactly which standards you are not meeting and why is good. Make them tell you exactly why you are not meeting them - on my NQT year when I did that suddenly I was deemed to be passing on standards that they couldn't explain properly.



    Also, make sure they give you enough notice that you are going to fail in order to give you time to improve. If they don't give you enough warning, they have to pass you.



    Don't you suggest to leave early, wait until they suggest it. Hopefully they won't. If you suggest it now they will think you're a doormat and an easy target and will use you as a fine example of how excellent their skills in tackling poor performers are, and might pin a few mistakes of theirs on you too. This potentially will ruin the rest of your career.



    For now just get clarification of what you need to do, and then do it.
     
  6. The most important thing is that you do something about it as soon as possible.
    I am also an NQT and although I am on track to pass no problems, I also found the stress piling up too much. Since Feb half term, all I wanted was to leave as I was not happy in my current job, most nights I would drive home in tears and mornings wake up desparate not to go back. I bottled this up inside but eventually I told work that I was struggling. However, I was too late and ended up having a meltdown, I was in tears last week in my head's office and have now been signed off for a month with depression and panic disorder.
    Whether you tell your head, your mentor, another teacher or a doctor, you must tell someone about your struggles. Don't give up now, tell someone and allow them to give you the support you need. I should have a long time ago and have learnt the hard way.
     
  7. I've mentored NQT's several times over the years and am currently mentoring again this year.
    I suggest following sage's advice and getting together with your mentor. I hold fortnightly meetings with my NQT to check everything is going OK and to give us time to formulate action plans if necessary.
    We plan follow up actions following each termly observation. These have involved me teaching a lesson with her class, observing different teachers in the same year group, and paired observations where I was able to point out what was making each lesson good. We also shared ideas and strategies. Sometimes we do this at school, sometimes we do this over coffee off site.
    Mentors have a massive responsibility towards NQT's. Grit your teeth, arrange a meeting with your mentor and ask for a clear plan of action to be put into place. If that doesn't work, request a meeting with your headteacher and explain some of your frustrations and the impact they are having on your day to day classroom management.
    At the end of this, you will come out of it a much stronger person and a much better teacher. Sadly, it is usually the more difficult experiences that mould our practice into what it is today. And tell yourself that one day you will be a mentor to an NQT and you will take the responsibility differently.
    Teaching is really hard. Anyone who says it isn't is pretending. But that doesn't mean it's not worthwhile. All of us from NQT to almost retired are learning every day. The day I stop learning, reflecting and adapting my practice is the day I vow to leave the profession (and I hope I never ever stop learning).
    Good luck with speaking to your mentor. It's the professional way to handle a tricky situation.
    [​IMG]
     
  8. Dear Sage,
    I started my NQT year in September 2011 and I was told before Christmas that I was at risk of failure, so the school set an action plan to support me, mainly in my problems with Classroom Management. The measures stated in the action plan were: read this book by S.C who is an expert of CM strategies, watch this video by B.R. who is an expert in CM strategies and liaise more with Form tutors and Heads of Year - deadline to revise my progress: February 2012. Since then I've done all that was stated in the action plan but when I went to the meeting with the Head 2 weeks ago to review my progress, I was told that I'll have to do a further term (4 instead of 3) because, even if I improved in many aspects, sometimes I still lose my temper during lessons. I'm wondering: is this reason enough to expect an extra term from me before giving me the NQT status? and shouldn't the school formalize this decision with some form of written document? in the end the school didn't provide me with any practical support...I have done what was written in the Action Plan so I don't understand what are the criteria against which they are measuring my (lack of) progress... Is it legal for the school to determine now that I won't have achieved the necessary progress by the end of the school year? I find all this a bit unfair and not very clear...could you suggest me how to proceed in this matter? I'd really appreciate any advice!
     
  9. Hi Laclaude,
    I was in a similar situation last week and it was my 3rd term. The school said they were going to extend my induction, but that meant I was going to be failed before they could offer me the extension.
    Talk to your union and find out exactly what doing a 4th term will mean in terms of reports and also talk to the LA to find out about extension.
    I finally left hoping to find a school to do my third term of induction.
    Good luck with it.
     
  10. Thanks for all the advice - it was really helpful. I did already have an action plan in place but I felt I was getting terrible feedback and wasn't meeting it. Thankfully after making it clear how everything looked from my point of view I am being given more useful and positive feedback too. The head has also admitted that things are not as bad as they appeared and a lot comes down to her wanting to set very high standards. Since then things have improved a lot and I feel much more confident. So long as they continue as they are going I should be passing comfortably, although I am still not impressed that I was made to feel like I was no good at my job and my career could be over for the sake of high standards.
     
  11. PaulDG

    PaulDG Occasional commenter

    You have got to work on that!

    If you cannot control yourself at times, what chance have you got of controlling others?

    There are many books on anger management and your own school's SENCO may be able to help as they'll be used to dealing with kids with anger issues.

    To be frank, it could be reason enough to fire you on the spot and to report to the induction body that you are a danger to the childrens' learning.

    Arranging for you to do an extra term is actually rather a good thing. It gives you more time to show what you can do after the summer break (when you'll come back knowing many of the kids from day 1) and it's another whole term where you'll keep your 10% timetable reduction which can't be bad!
     
  12. There are some problems here with what the school has said to you. The school cannot make a decision about an extension of anyinduction time. Anb extension can only be granted by the LA and only after you have failed and appealed. So in effect the school is prejudging that you have failed and made a successful appeal against that to the LA and been granted an extenstion - the LA decides on the extension and it could be a term in certain instances they have granted an extension of the full year.
    Reading bookms and looking at videos is a start but not the way to correct problems, that needs specific intervention and, I suspect coaching. I would ask for another meeting explain that you have reviwed the induction regulations (do this before the meeting by reading the statutory guidance in full - available here: http://media.education.gov.uk/assets/files/pdf/s/statutory%20guidance%20on%20induction%20for%20newly%20qualified%20teachers%20nqts%20in%20england.pdf

    Also contact your union for advice and support. Get them involved to act on your behalf.
    In essence the school must put forard its plan (as they have) but they must also offer practical help and advice even extra training where necesary and they should ask the LA NQT adviser to be involved.
    The Sage
     

Share This Page