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strategies to use with an autistic child in reception?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by charlotteday, Jan 29, 2011.

  1. hi
    I was just wondering if anyone has any advice on what work and what doesn't when it comes to ASD children in reception? Any advice would be gratefully recieved,
    Thanks
    Charlotte xx
     
  2. hi
    I was just wondering if anyone has any advice on what work and what doesn't when it comes to ASD children in reception? Any advice would be gratefully recieved,
    Thanks
    Charlotte xx
     
  3. slippeddisc

    slippeddisc New commenter

    Depends on the child. Is there anything in particular that worries you?
     
  4. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    ASD is a blanket term and can cover a huge spectrum of difficulties as slippeddisc says every child is different. One thing I would do is always use the child's name when giving instructions so they know you mean them as well as "everyone".
     
  5. Having worked with children and adults with ASD for several years I'd be more than happy to advise you on general issues, styles of learning, resources etc.
    Feel free to email me info@tpet.co.uk
    It is very difficult to give a bullet point list of Do's and Don'ts as every child with ASD is different but the main thing to keep in mind is the 'triad of impairments' social interaction, communication and imagination (these are the 3 core issues to consider in all your approaches.)
    You might find this link helpful - it talks about the triad of impairments and gives general rules on what works and what doesn't in relation to these. E.g speak in short sentences, limit vocab. Having routine. How to approach behaviour issues.
    http://www.chsn.org.uk/media/pdf_docs/ASDHelpingtheASDChild.pdfHope this helps
    Kind regards
    Christina [​IMG]
     
  6. Named, clear instructions.
    Build up an excellent working partnership with the parents
    Concrete experiences - eg.real coins not pretend.
    Visual timetable and warnings about changing activity in x minutes
    Think about your language, 'Keep your eye on it' could be very confusing! etc.
    Find out their 'obsessive' and have a timeout area for when they can't cope.
    Be aware they may be hypersensitive to lights, noises, textures
    But most of all enjoy them and remember everyone has their own challenges at the end of the day all the above ideas work well for all children and not just those with ASD!
     
  7. thanks for all the advice, i have had a lot of experience with ASD in secondary school children but i have now moved to primary and wondered what other people were using. :)
     

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