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Stories from other cultures

Discussion in 'Primary' started by pooped, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. pooped

    pooped New commenter

    Hi
    Have taught this a couple of times now and whilst the children and I have really enjoyed the reading and exploring texts, I find that writing their own is often a big let down!!
    Does anyone have any suggestions for structuring this story writing or stories they have used for children to base their own writing on?
    Thank you x
     
  2. pooped

    pooped New commenter

    Hi
    Have taught this a couple of times now and whilst the children and I have really enjoyed the reading and exploring texts, I find that writing their own is often a big let down!!
    Does anyone have any suggestions for structuring this story writing or stories they have used for children to base their own writing on?
    Thank you x
     
  3. We have done this unit very successfully, reading and exploring stories such as 'Journey to Jo'burg' and 'Grandpa Chatterjii'
    For the writing part, we based this on Cinderella- there a loads of great quality picture books of Cinderella stories from around the world- we used an African one, a Carribean one, a Middle Eastern one and a European one. The children found the similarities in the story (the structure- very good for recapping traditional tales from Y3) and the differences- the details from other cultures. Our theme was 'Africa' at the time, so we researched a few countries, allowed the children to choose one and wrote a Cinderella story using both the structure they came up with and any details they could think of from the culture they had chosen.
    We finished with a lovely book of stories, all based on Cinderella but with a feel of Africa.
    Doing it again this year!
    LT
     
  4. I've used Handa's Surprise and Handa's Hen in the past... lots of repetition too to aid their own writing!
     
  5. I've seen it linked to lots of texts, but I'm re-visiting it during Chinese New Year week with the oral story of the blue willow pattern.
    I stole the idea from one of my uni school placements, but it worked so well there is no way I'm not trying it!
    I'll read the story and show the pattern on a plate...then we'll talk about other stories and how their plate would look if we created one.
    Then, the children will write their own stories AFTER drawing out the beginning, middle and end (and any other interesting bits) on a paper plate. Makes for an interesting display too.
     
  6. I did Handas Surprise with my Y1s this term - we re-wrote it set in England, and changed the animals to british ones and the fruits to ones that can be grown in the UK.
    Together we decided on the characters we wanted in our story, and did a shared write of the first couple of pages. Then each child wrote their own page and drew a picture following the repetition "Will he like the round juicy orange?", focussing on describing words, and I laminated these and made a book out of them. We then did a shared write again of the ending.
    It sits in our reading corner now and they love it. I also based an assembly on it, talking about "taking a risk and being proud". I explained my class were taking a risk and each child showed their own page from the book (before id put it all together).
    I then invited 3 children to come and 'take a risk' and try some passionfruit - as its from the story and it looks a bit weird.
    It worked really well.
     
  7. This sounds great! What were the names of the books you used? I can't seem to find an African version. I am also doing the topic 'Africa' after half term and would love to link the Cinderella and Africa theme.
    Could I take a look at your plans?
    melaniehiggs@btinternet.com
    thanks
    MH
     
  8. Hi

    Why not take a look at the Victoria & Albert Museum's Cretaive Workshop programme. The workshap called 'Make your owns story' starts with a true Indian story (related to Tipu's Tiger, one of our 'star' objects'), and the children then construct their own story around a chosen object.

    I'd be happy to tailor the workshop for you (our collections span the world from China to the Middle East) and we could come up with some wonderful stories from around the world.

    Do give me cal/email on 0207 942 2776 or g.brownson@vam.ac.uk or take a look at the website http://www.vam.ac.uk/school_stdnts/schools/Primary%20Schools/index.html

    Thanks
    Gill
     
  9. pooped

    pooped New commenter

    Thank you all for your suggestions. Will definitely be expanding my book collection. I really appreciate it x
     

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