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Storecupboard Surgery

Discussion in 'Cookery' started by lapinrose, May 18, 2011.

  1. lapinrose

    lapinrose Lead commenter

    Mango and ginger trifle, chop up a jamaica ginger cake, chop the mangoes and mix in, soak in rum pour custard on top and then whipped cream. Highly indulgent!
    Mango ice cream, mix chopped mangoes with a small carton of custard and the same of whipped cream.
    Mango and croissant pudding, slice mangoes, slice croissant, put in dish pour over egg and milk whisked together, bake, may be nice with some cardamon seeds.
     
  2. *faints*
     
  3. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    Thanks for the ideas - Lapin I'll have to try some of yours in the future! They sound purely wicked!
    I ended up cooking the mango flesh down with some vanilla sugar, water and sherry (every good kitchen should have a bottle of cooking sherry!) and added some diced peaches and an apple.
    I whipped up a Victoria sponge and topped the fruit mixture with it and baked. We'll have it hot in front of the Apprentice later with some ice cream...
     
  4. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    I've done this before with BBQed pork chops but my fussy eater didn't like it and would only eat with half a bottle of brown sauce on top. [​IMG]
     
  5. I still have a packet of quinoa to ...do something with (I had a thread about it - the quinoa has still not been used!)
     
  6. Oh - and a packet of amaranth.
     
  7. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    The most important thing with quinoa is that your pronounce it properly! [​IMG]
    I mainly use it in place of couscous.
    I make a nice salad with quinoa, courgette, lemon and feta if you want the recipe.
     
  8. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    I made an aubergine (ha, ha - still obsessed!) and tomato bake with quinoa last week (or was it the week before?).
    It was quite nice, but really just like ratatouille without the courgette. The quinoa added a nice texture and provided a good source of non-meat protein.
     
  9. I still haven't been able to get any aubergines [​IMG] Did you just bung the quinoa in?
    EG - would love the recipe, if you could post it.
     
  10. anon468

    anon468 New commenter

    Yep, pretty much.
    Soften onion & garlic in olive oil, add 2 tins of chopped tomatoes, 150g quinoa, a big squirt of tomato puree and 300ml just boiled water. Simmer for 20 mins and stir in a good handful of chopped, fresh basil.
    Meanwhile, heat some more olive oil in a separate pan and fry the aubergines (cut into medium chunks) for 15 mins until softened. Add a splash of water if pan looks dry.
    Empty the tomato/quinoa mixture and the cooked aubergines into a 2 litre ovenproof dish, mix well and sprinkle with 50g of grated parmesan cheese (optional for vegans).
    Grill for 3-5 mins until piping hot and garnish with more chopped, fresh basil.
     
  11. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    Cook the quinoa according to the packet instructions and rinse and drain under cold water. Use a speed peeler to cut a courgette into ribbons Whisk together 2 parts olive oil to one part red wine vinegar and season with S&P. Add a finely chopped red chilli, sliced spring onion, sliced radishes, halved cherry tomatoes, crumbled feta and some chopped parsley to the quinoa before pouring the dressing over.
     
  12. Thanks for the recipes - I shall give them a try.
    There aren't any cooking instructions on the packet though! (I bought the stuff to make burgers, so no idea how long to cook it for or who much water to use).
     
  13. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

  14. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    This recipe for Quinoa with Red Carmargue Rice from Ottolenghi is superb. Like all of his recipes, it's quite involved, but it's worth it. Apologies for the imperial measurements:
    1/4 cup shelled pistachios
    1 cup quinoa
    1 cup red rice (see headnotes)
    1 medium white onion, sliced
    2/3 cup olive oil
    grated zest and juice of one orange
    2 teaspoons lemon juice
    1 garlic clove, crushed
    4 spring onions, thinly sliced
    1/2 cup dried apricots, roughly chopped
    2 handfuls of rocket (arugula)
    salt and black pepper

    Preheat the oven to 350F degrees. Spread the pistachios out on a baking tray and toast for 8 minutes, until lightly colored. Remove from the oven, allow to cool slightly and then chop roughly. Set aside.
    Fill two saucepans with salted water and bring to a boil. Simmer the quinoa in one for 12 - 14 minutes and the rice in the other for 20 minutes. Both should be tender but still have a bite. Drain in a sieve and spread out the two grains separately on flat trays to hasten the cooling down.
    While the grains are cooking, saute the white onion in 4 tablespoons of the olive oil until golden brown. Leave to cool completely.
    In a large mixing bowl combine the rice, quinoa, cookied onion and the remaining oil. Add all the rest of the ingredients, the taste and adjust the seasoning. Serve at room temperature.

     
  15. marshypops

    marshypops New commenter

    I have an un-open packet of tamarind paste with no recollection of why I got it...
     
  16. marshypops

    marshypops New commenter

    Thank you, looking at the list of ingredients (I have everything on the list [​IMG]). It must have been a Madhur Jaffrey inspired dish but your suggestion looks great so I'll give that one a whirl first :)
     
  17. Si N. Tiffick

    Si N. Tiffick Occasional commenter

    A lot of indian dishes require a blob of tamarind added to finish the dish- try adding some at the end of cooking to a fish curry.
     
  18. nick909

    nick909 Lead commenter

    It's used a lot in Goan curries, and as Si says, in fish ones. Features heavily in Thai food as well. My advice would be to be cautious and add a little at a time - it's easy to overdo it and end up with something too sour.
     
  19. egyptgirl

    egyptgirl Senior commenter

    No idea how it got there but I have a tin of tomato soup in the pantry. Any ideas anyone?
     

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