1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Still at work?

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mms1, Mar 20, 2020.

  1. mms1

    mms1 Occasional commenter

    Hi all,

    Just interested to see who is still turning up to work. From where I'm sitting it seems most schools are still open as the key worker list is pretty broad.

    Thanks.
     
    1 person likes this.
  2. CarrieV

    CarrieV Lead commenter

    We're doing one day a week each, that's enough to cover the children we will have in school
     
    Lara mfl 05 likes this.
  3. MaryDG

    MaryDG New commenter

    Similar at ours, roughly 10% of children in
     
  4. Over_the_hill

    Over_the_hill Star commenter

    We have to go in every day as normal.
     
  5. Josh7

    Josh7 Occasional commenter

    We're in once a week, when not in have been tasked with writing end of year reports, submitting data, identifying off track children, updating plans...

    Believe the home tasks are just for the first two weeks, then after the 2 week holiday (don't know yet if the rota for going into school will change) think we will be setting & interacting with our pupils via websites such as Purple Mash & Education City. The children were sent home with activity packs for the first two weeks.
     
  6. mms1

    mms1 Occasional commenter

    I've heard some teachers only going in 1 day every fortnight. There doesn't seem to be much in the way of logistical planning in terms of redistribution of labor. It feels terrible when you consider there are services stretched beyond capacity whilst tens of thousands of teachers and support staff are more or less on garden leave. Perhaps someone has already thought of this but perhaps we could be supporting the overstretched Social Care system whilst not needed in school?
     
  7. Sally006

    Sally006 Senior commenter

    The priority is social distancing. It is right and proper that rotas reflect that your exposure is as minimal as possible. This is not WW2 - no sirens to warn and no gas masks provided so to speak. Your school has a duty of care to protect you and the vulnerable kids in school. Heads need to be tough and not give in to the parents thinking they are entitled because they are on the list. Even those parents should not be using schools except in an emergency - yes they can but only when in a crisis of not just for convenient childcare. I am staggered by the number of parents not grasping the magnitude of this. They should not want their kids in school. I know of 2 parents working in the Pharmaceutical industry who have been instructed to work from home (due to their company taking responsibility over social distancing) and yet they think they can send their kids to school because they are on the list!!! Get a grip! And they should be understanding the science. Beggars belief!
     
    007louise and lardylady like this.
  8. mms1

    mms1 Occasional commenter

    Social distancing is to reduce the possible spread of covid but the gaps emerging in key worker populations and the increased vulnerability of children and families surely could be offset by a workforce of qualified teachers and support staff. We would be able to shore up essential public services such as social care and in so doing reduce the strain on society. That's got to to be more beneficial than frankly processing now redundant paperwork. My wife is a social worker and reports a system in crisis where people are now and will increasingly be in a very dark place. They simply haven't got enough people to help and are drafting in from where they can- no sending people home!

    I guess the simple question is what can we do to help?
     
  9. TheOracleAtDelphi

    TheOracleAtDelphi Established commenter

    One MAT I know about is expecting all staff in on Monday and for the foreseeable until/unless things change...there was talk of them doing regular online/phone check-ins of the more vulnerable pupils, delivering parcels of food etc. as needed and generally trying to keep as much contact with pupils who weren't in school as possible as well as looking after those who are.

    Another school has a large number of children who will be keyworker children or on the vulnerable list (way more than the 20% that has been talked about) and I suspect they will almost be business as normal on Monday...

    It would be interesting to know what the wider picture is like ...
     
  10. MadHatter1985

    MadHatter1985 New commenter

    Hi

    We have a training day on Monday and then distance learning for most children and teaching/supervision of children of key workers etc. from Tuesday. It looks like we will have about 10% (or just over) of the children in school. There is going to be some kind of rota to teach the children in school but we haven't been told what that is yet. No-one has mentioned anything about Easter yet.
     
  11. Ezzie

    Ezzie Occasional commenter

    We’ve been told we have to work our contracted hours or not get paid but still waiting confirmation on this - whole staff in on Monday for a meeting about it o_O
     
  12. Sundaytrekker

    Sundaytrekker Star commenter

    My school has already created a rota for staff which extends over the Easter holidays and into next term.
     
  13. handee2

    handee2 New commenter

    My school has created a rota too. HT took my situation into account- cancer in my ear,awaiting an operation still on currently and has allowed me to work from home from yesterday. My husband has had a series of heart attacks, the latest one in January and I am concerned for him. I really am grateful for this support.
     
  14. caterpillartobutterfly

    caterpillartobutterfly Star commenter

    We have a rota of teaching time...3 hours a day, every day for every teacher. (Unless they are claiming to be in one of the vulnerable groups or are self isolating or are ill or are otherwise able to claim they don't have to be in.)
    The rest of the time is to be spent sorting digital lessons and the like, from home or school.
     
  15. sunshineneeded

    sunshineneeded Star commenter

    We're one full day a week each, for every teacher and TA (unless in the vulnerable groups), but we have to be on call every day as expecting more staff to need to self-isolate as time goes on. We've already been told this will continue through the Easter holidays.
     
  16. TheOneTonBun

    TheOneTonBun New commenter

    Foster carers in my county have been written to and told that all looked after children must continue to go to school every day, regardless. Meanwhile my kids' school has written to us and told us that if we send out children in they have to go in every day without fail, or not at all.

    How your actual school responds seems to depend on the demographic of the area. I have friends that are teaching in urban areas with very high proportions of EHCP and working parents. Their heads have told them to not even think about closing. School will be opening tomorrow to all children and they will be teaching as normal.

    Other schools in the area are expecting half their intake tomorrow.

    Mixed messages doesn't even seem to cover what is happening at the moment.
     
  17. timlondinium

    timlondinium New commenter

    Our Head Teacher has sent an email in to say we are expected to go in every day from 9 till 4. The teachers are to work on planning etc and "muck in where necessary", the support staff to supervise the key worker children coming in. One of the children coming in will be my own.

    The rooms will be rotated so any virus that is in school will have a chance to die before the room is used again. I understand as an academy we're a business and they want their "pound of flesh" but I'm concerned that by coming each day, I'm increasing my chances of picking up the virus. If I do get unwell my wife, who is a key worker for the NHS, would have to take 14 days off.
     
    Sally006 likes this.
  18. Rebru

    Rebru New commenter

    What does your rota look like? In daily? weekly? Will you be teaching chn by phase? etc Thanks
     

Share This Page