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Steiner

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by Hedda Gabler, Feb 8, 2008.

  1. Another thread led me to a link about Steiner schools-not all poitive I am afraid.

    Could anybody enlighten me about "anthroposophy" ? Don't want a thesis just a few lines if you have time.
     
  2. Another thread led me to a link about Steiner schools-not all poitive I am afraid.

    Could anybody enlighten me about "anthroposophy" ? Don't want a thesis just a few lines if you have time.
     
  3. His approach was systematic, and appears to have been based on his own extensive experience of working as a tutor, and on his study of 'anthroposophy' or 'spiritual science'.
    Here are some of its key points:
    ? Up to the age of seven encourage play, drawing, story telling, being at home, nature study and natural things.
    ? Do not teach children younger than seven to read.
    ? Teach a child to write before you teach them to read.
    ? Do not keep changing a child's teacher: allow one teacher to carry on teaching the same class for seven years.
    ? Allow children to concentrate on one subject at a time - do history two hours per day for several weeks and then do geography for two hours per day etc.
    ? Find links between art and science.
    ? Engage with the child and make sure that they are enthusiastic about the material being covered.
    ? Give a moral lead but do not teach a particular set of beliefs.
    ? Encourage learning for its own sake. Do not just work for exams.



    (dunno if this answers your question enough)

     
  4. The premise from which Steiner education starts is that ?each human being comprises
    body, soul and spirit? (Rawson and Richter 2000: 14). Education is meant to be part of
    the process whereby ?the spiritual core of the person [strives] to come ever more fully to
    expression within and through the organism he or she has inherited and must
    individualise? (op. cit.: 7). To this end, the range of human faculties are awakened
    (cognitive, affective, creative, etc.) in a balanced way according to the anthroposophical
    model of human development. Integral to Steiner school education is encouragement of
    balanced growth towards ?physical, behavioural, emotional, cognitive, social and
    spiritual maturation?
     
  5. Thank you for taking the time to post.

    Could any of that be loosely interpreted as reincarnation?

    "the spiritual core of the person [strives] to come ever more fully to
    expression within and through the organism he or she has inherited"
     
  6. The Australian: Questions about Steiner's classroom

    http://www.theaustralian.news.com.au/story/0,25197,221472...

    Quote:
    Reading and writing is delayed until children have developed adult teeth -- at age seven -- to focus on developing the child's healthy body.

    Anthroposophy lecturer Robert Martin, who trains Steiner teachers, said being aware of the spiritual side of life enriched the education experience. He said people had many different names for the spiritual world -- arch angels, angels, intelligent beings and presence -- and they existed long before humans.

    "I want to co-work with the angels," Mr Martin said. "These individuals are very advanced ... Our job is to co-work with the spiritual beings."
     
  7. Steiner believed in reincarnation and that during the first 7 years the child is finding his or her way in the world so needs protection and a carefully planned environment during this time. Steiner?s theory of child development elaborated three cycles of seven-year stages, each with its own distinctive needs for learning:
    ? The will, 0-7 years ? he believed the spirit fuses with the body at this stage.
    ? The heart, 7-14 years ? he believed that the rhythmic system of the beating heart, the chest and the respiratory system meant that feelings were especially important during this time.
    ? The head, 14 years onwards ? this is the period of thinking.
    (Bruce and Meggit, Childcare and Education page 495)
     
  8. I've never heard such ******** in my life. Are there people out there that really buy in to this clap trap?
     
  9. This is scary stuff.

     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Confess to knowing next to nothing about Steiner but I followed the link to mumsnet and found a huge variety of posts some very positive and others equally negative

    http://www.mumsnet.com/SearchArch

    I suppose it is all about the right to chose ?
    Found this on a google of Anthroposophy
    "Anthroposophy is a modern spiritual path that cherishes and respects the freedom of each individual. It recognises however, that real freedom is actually an inner capacity that can only be obtained by degrees according to the spiritual development of the individual. The striving for this capacity, and the corresponding spiritual development, can be greatly assisted through a scientific study of the spiritual nature of humanity and the universe. Such a study is available in the writings and lectures of Rudolf Steiner - an initiate of the twentieth century. Steiner called his study - spiritual research or Anthroposophy.

    Anthroposophy is thus not only the spiritual path to freedom, it is also a scientific study of the spiritual knowledge gained on this path. For Steiner, Anthroposophy was the path that could 'lead the spiritual in the human being to the spiritual in the universe'. And he showed that it is a path that is capable of inspiring many cultural innovations - in education, agriculture, medicine, architecture, science and the arts - and much else. "

    "The Waldorf curriculum is artistically structured to respond to the developmental needs of children. Steiner Waldorf education respects the essential nature of childhood, enabling children to develop their strengths in a child-sensitive environment. In the early years, a secure, unhurried setting gives children vital social, linguistic and dexterity skills, sound foundations for emotional and cognitive intelligence. A sense of wonder can mature through homely activities, creative play and self-motivated inquiry, maintaining intact the qualities essential for lifelong learning."
     
  11. Msz wonders if it is about the right to choose.

    Should gullible parents be able to make a choice that may severely affect the lives of their children who are too young to make real choices for themselves?

    The withholding of direct reading instruction until the age of seven has no scientific basis whatsoever, in Steiner OR any other school.

    This is what Steiner himself had to say about the teaching of reading and writing in his book, ?The Kingdom of Childhood?:
    ?People will object that the children then learn to read and write too late. That is said only because it is not known today how harmful it is when the children learn to read and write too soon. It is a very bad thing to be able to write early. Reading and writing as we have them today are really not suited to the human being till a later age - the eleventh or twelfth year - and the more a child is blessed with not being able to read and write well before this age, the better it is for the later years of life. A child who cannot write properly at thirteen or fourteen (I can speak out of my own experience because I could not do it at that age) is not so hindered for later spiritual development as one who early, at seven or eight years can already read and write perfectly?.

     
  12. Thanks for all your responses. I have a clearer view.

    Fuzzy duck calls it "********!" and I would tend to agree.

    However one man's ******** is another man's belief system.

    I think that the concerning thing is that this belief system may not have been made transparent to parents.

    I am starting to understand the concerned posts about Steiner involvment on
    https://www.tes.co.uk/section/staffroom/thread.aspx?story_...

     
  13. mimi123 re:post 10
    thanks for the link mimi - I am still working my way through reading it.
     
  14. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Susan it is entirely about freedom of choice while you and I may not share these beliefs it does not give us the right to make the choices for others. If these children were attending a faith school that was against our own belief would we be so ready to condemn?
    Steiner supporters would argue that children succeed in such a system, go onto university and become successful members of the community.
     
  15. Msz

    "If these children were attending a faith school that was against our own belief would we be so ready to condemn?"


    I thought about that too. I am in agreement with your argument but I think that Susan's concern is that the belief system, upon which Steiner philosophy is based, may not be made transparent to parents. She implies that the outward expression of the philosophy ia accessible but the deep structure appears covert.

    I feel that if a new sect established itself tomorrow upon the same lines and based on spurious research that there might be an investigation.
     
  16. Sorry to jump in there Susan and Msz.

    After all until yesterday I had no idea about anthroposophy, so have hardly got a considered opinion, have I?
     
  17. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Hedda I agree the beliefs attributed to Steiner expressed here do not seem right to me but I confess to knowing very little about this system so do not feel in a position to make an informed judgement. However it appears that many people do make informed judgements to educate their children within this system judging from other threads on the site SusanG posted.
     
  18. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    SusanG at 09 Feb 2008 09:28


    The withholding of direct reading instruction until the age of seven has no scientific basis whatsoever, in Steiner OR any other school.

    Susan as with anything there is always research to "prove" it ...
    Brent, D., May, D. C., & Kundert, D. K. (1996). The incidence of
    delayed school entry: A twelve-year review. Early Education and
    Development, 7(2), 121-135. EJ 520 504.
    Byrd, R. S., Weitzman, M., & Auinger, P. (1997). Increased
    behavior problems associated with delayed school entry and
    delayed school progress. Pediatrics, 100(4), 654-661.
    Cromwell, S. (1998). Starting kindergarten late: How does it
    affect school performance? Education World [Online]. Available:
    http://www.educationworld.com/a_admin/admin045.shtml.
    Graue, M. E., & DiPerna, J. (in press). Redshirting and early
    retention: Who gets the "gift of time" and what are its outcomes?
    American Educational Research Journal.
    Kundert, D. K., May, D. C., & Brent, D. (1995). A comparison of
    students who delay kindergarten entry and those who are
    retained in grades K?5. Psychology in the Schools, 32(3), 202-
    209. EJ 517 406.
    May, D. C., Kundert, D. K., & Brent, D. (1995). Does delayed
    school entry reduce later grade retentions and use of special
    education services? Remedial and Special Education, 16(5),
    288-294. EJ 510 039.
    National Center for Early Development and Learning (NCEDL).
    (1998). Kindergarten transitions [Online]. NECDL Spotlights, 1.
    Available: http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~ncedl/PAGES/ spotlt.htm.
    Shepard, L. A., & Smith, M. L. (1988). Escalating academic
    demand in kindergarten: Counterproductive policies. Elementary
    School Journal, 89(2), 135-145. EJ 382 617.
    Spitzer, S., Cupp, R., & Parke, R. D. (1995). School entrance
    age, social acceptance, and self-perception in kindergarten and
    1st grade. Early Childhood Research Quarterly, 10(4), 433-450.
    EJ 516 737.
    West, J., Denton, K., & Germino-Hausken, E. (2000). America's
    kindergartners. (NCES No. 2000-070). Washington, DC: U.S.
    Department of Education.
    West, J., Meek, A., & Hurst, D. (2000). Children who enter
    kindergarten late or repeat kindergarten: Their characteristics
    and later school performance. (NCES No. 2000-039).
    Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.


    Personally I think most (but not all) children are ready to begin to learn to read by the time they enter reception but I do think judgement of readiness should be left to skilled professionals.
     
  19. "Personally I think most (but not all) children are ready to begin to learn to read by the time they enter reception but I do think judgement of readiness should be left to skilled professionals."

    MSZ Hear Hear!

    How we interact with the children is crucial to their learning and we must be supportive not stifling.

    Adults can sometimes hinder learning more than they help it, when they are not sensitive, informed observers who tune into what interests a child, and are skilled in using what the child knows and takes to readily as access into more challenging areas for the child. (Bruce, 2004:115)

    Early years educators should think of the support they lend as flexible and fluid, matching the needs of the child. Sometimes support needs to be solid, perhaps to advance a new skill, while at other times the support offered should merely follow the child's lead down the variety of pathways offered by creative activities. ?The style of interactions between the educator and the child is a critical factor in the effectiveness of the learning experience.? (Pascal & Bertram 1997)
     

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