1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded education professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

States of matter

Discussion in 'Science' started by egm2786, Feb 17, 2016.

  1. egm2786

    egm2786 New commenter

    Hi all,

    Am I right in thinking that states of matter comes under 'Chemistry'?

    I'm doing a big project for my FD and just wanted to be sure!
    :))
     
  2. rachel_g41

    rachel_g41 Established commenter

    I think maybe it depends on what level and what scheme you're thinking of but..

    In my current and recent experience, at KS3 it comes under Chemistry although changes of state can come under the heat energy or energy transfer topics within Physics.

    In the IGCSE I teach (CIE), in both the Combined (single) and Coordinated (double) it comes under both, that is it appears as unit C1 in Chemistry, but the syllabus simply refers to the corresponding Physics unit.

    In the separate (triple) sciences, it does appear in both.
     
  3. neddyfonk

    neddyfonk Lead commenter

    At primary level states of matter in Chemistry is solid, liquid and gas. Most chemicals make the transition when heated ( ice, water, vapour via freezing, melting, boiling/evaporation ). At secondary you might add sublimation ( direct transition from solid to gas ( Iodine / Ammonium Chloride ) and possibly Plasma / super conductivity ).
     
  4. wanet

    wanet Star commenter

    What people often refer to as water vapour is really condensed water. If you can see it, then it is liquid water.
     
  5. peterdevon

    peterdevon New commenter

    The particle model of solids, liquids and gases is a useful starting point for Chemistry, as it gets the students to think about particles... and Chemistry is mostly about understanding what the particles do: how they change and what properties they have.
     
  6. egm2786

    egm2786 New commenter

    Thank you all for your helpful comments :) Much appreciated!
     

Share This Page