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Starting up LAMDA exams

Discussion in 'Drama and performing arts' started by nwyllie, Oct 24, 2012.

  1. Hi
    I have been asked to consider how to develop Drama across the school and have been looking at the possibiltiy of starting to introduce LAMDA exams. Has anyone done this / experienced this? How much would it cost school to start up? Will it mean lots of extra work for me? What benefits have you noticed?
    I need as much information as possible; looked on their website and emailed them a few questions but wanted to gather some real evidence from teachers who had already done this to pitch it to Leadership.
    All advice gratefully received!
    Nicky
     
  2. Hi
    I have been asked to consider how to develop Drama across the school and have been looking at the possibiltiy of starting to introduce LAMDA exams. Has anyone done this / experienced this? How much would it cost school to start up? Will it mean lots of extra work for me? What benefits have you noticed?
    I need as much information as possible; looked on their website and emailed them a few questions but wanted to gather some real evidence from teachers who had already done this to pitch it to Leadership.
    All advice gratefully received!
    Nicky
     
  3. netmum

    netmum New commenter

    I'm involved in doing the admin for LAMDA exams in an out of school setting.
    It costs virtually nothing to set up,just the cost of the LAMDA Acting anthology and a few other books of monologues (I reccomend Jean Marlow audition speeches 6-16 as a good started book for Grades 1-5.
    The syllabus is downloadable from the LAMDA website. Read it carefully, its very specific but very helpful.
    I send my candidates to a public centre as I don't have enough for a private session (well I do but for various reasons they are split over two sessions) .
    The main cost is the cost of tuition. To get the best out of it I think they need private lessons in the same way as instrumental lessons. The problem with doing it in groups is that you cansometimes end up with what I call identikit LAMDA, they need time to explore their own interpretations of the pieces.
     
  4. pussycat

    pussycat New commenter

    LAMDA is huge at my school. Parents really like it and so do the kids who have lessons to be honest. Don't kid your self that it's Drama though - it is awful stagey recitation and I spend many of my first GCSE lessons with kids trying to de-LAMDA them. Lots of kids take it as an public speaking/confidence boosting extra as a GCSE alternative and so it can cut down your GCSE numbers and I believe that it has done this where I teach. I think it's dreadful.
     
  5. What about the Trinity College suite?http://www.trinitycollege.co.uk/site/?id=139I examine their ESOL exams and like the syllabus - very logical & realistic; don't know the drama syllabus.
     
  6. Nicky
    I started LAMDA acting classes/exams at our school, a few years ago, as an extra curricular activity with huge interest and success. It is very simple to get started and as most of the work ie; learning lines etc is done by the students at home, so there isnt too much extra work for teachers. The students require light direction and a small amount of theory.
    We are now a host centre for external students as well our own. It has been a very successful venture. Go for it and good luck.
    Ashlea.
     
  7. Hi

    I am also wanting to do the same thing. I am a drama gratuate and wanting to start up my own classes and then go into schools with it.

    I have have done training sessions and now trying to observe as many lessons as I can. It really does cost nothing, You just need venue and all the documentation and then you are good to know. As long as you know all the different levels and have all the books with all the pieces then its all good.

    Where are you based? I am based in North West London.

    Hope that has helped, and it would be good to keep in touch to see how you are getting on.

    Sophie.
     
  8. I run a large LAMDA department which is extra curricular and we bring in specialist staff to teach it like instrument lessons. I agree with pussycat, that it is just stagey recitation for the most part and not really what we would call drama. There are some good elements like the mime course, devising and musical theatre. It will not coast anything to set up if you can staff it but the exams are extra. I also agree that some think that by taking LAMDA and getting lots of drama UCAS points that way then they don't have to use up a choice on drama at GCSE/A Level.
     
  9. Tinyfairy

    Tinyfairy New commenter

    Hi,

    Sorry to jump on the bandwagon a little but does anyone know if it is possible to teach LAMDA outside of the UK? I currently teach in China and am interested in LAMDA but I'm not sure if it's possible for me to do it from here.

    Thanks very much
     
  10. netmum

    netmum New commenter

    Magic cat is from the verse & prose syllabus not acting.

    It's also from the entry level syllabus which is pre grade 1. Children aged 8-10 usually take that grade but I would expect a drama scholarship potential candidate to have at least done grade 1 acting by that time

    My dd is in year 6 and has taken grade 2 acting. She will do grade 3 later in the year.
     
  11. Actually Magic Cat is on the Entry Grade Verse and Prose syllabus which is aimed at 8 year olds. It is written by a brilliant, funny poet Peter Dixon http://www.peterdixon.org/

    Its fun, lively and my 8 year old pupils, boys and girls alike, love it. Why do they need 'feeling and meaning'? They're 8! However, I've had many a discussion about how the speaker of the poem feels at the end - angry, shocked, sad. This poem can be interpreted in many different ways. Moreover, they love magic, mystery and a good old family crisis. It's an excellent way into verse speaking, drama and has led to some great improv.


    The Magic Cat
    By Peter Dixon

    My mum whilst walking through the door
    Spilt some magic on the floor.
    Blobs of this
    And splots of that
    But most of it upon the cat.

    Our cat turned magic, straight away
    And in the garden went to play
    Where it grew two massive wings
    And flew around in fancy rings.
    ?Oh look!? cried Mother, pointing high,
    ?I didn?t know our cat could fly.?
    Then with a dash of Tibby?s tail
    She turned my mum into a snail!

    So now she lives beneath a stone
    And dusts around a different home.
    And I?m an ant
    And dad?s a mouse
    And Tibby?s living in our house.
     
  12. Having read some of the posts I'm beginning to think perhaps LAMDA should be avoided. However, I've also been asked to find out if it's posible to run the courses outside the UK, mainland Europe.
    Any info gratefully accepted
     
  13. aevan13

    aevan13 New commenter


    Hi there,
    How did you get on with introducing LAMDA exams in your school? Did you have to go through a specific process to get things up and running? I am working in an international school and I am thinking of introducing LAMDA exams as an extra-curricular option. Do you have any advice / top tips? Thanks in advance!
     
  14. Only for the acting though surely? I found a lot of creative scope in the public speaking and reading for performance exams...
     
  15. Yes, you can do it anywhere in the world. I was teaching in Beijing most of last year and set up the school as an exam centre and ran things without a hitch :)
     

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