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Starting phonics too young?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by BrainJim, Feb 27, 2012.

  1. Was invited into a school today to watch their 'incredible' phonics. Reception children all on phase three all knew igh, oa, oo long, oo short etc.. Teacher was so pleased with herself as the children shouted and acted out the sounds. Then she put ' a cat on a red rug' on the board and about 3 children had even the remotest idea. Are we deluding ourselves by pushing children on and on?
     
  2. Was invited into a school today to watch their 'incredible' phonics. Reception children all on phase three all knew igh, oa, oo long, oo short etc.. Teacher was so pleased with herself as the children shouted and acted out the sounds. Then she put ' a cat on a red rug' on the board and about 3 children had even the remotest idea. Are we deluding ourselves by pushing children on and on?
     
  3. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I would be extremely concerned that reception children are just on phase 3 at this point in the year if they started in September
     
  4. My children are working within Phase 3, but that's because we spent the first 6 weeks doing oral blending and sounding out amongst other speaking and listening skills. It really benefitted the children and has worked well in the long-term.
     
  5. This is the attitude I'm worried about. Msz saying things like 'just on phase 3'. Silly thing to say. Why the race? Big deal if a 4 year old can't read sentences that make absolutely no sense. There is a danger children can sound out hundreds of words without knowing what most of them mean. The teacher told me she was going to be doing 'ure' this week. How useful is that to a 4 year old. How many meaningful words are there? Manure?
    This whole thing seems so typical. An idea comes to the fore and then it is bashed to death.
     
  6. Seems as if they might know the phonemes in isolation when shown a flashcard, without knowing how to use that knowledge to blend and build words. It's actually rote learning of GPCs that's going on.
     
  7. modgepodge

    modgepodge Occasional commenter

    Are you saying that children being able to sound out lots of words is actually hindering their ability to understand the meaning?
    Surely it's 2 completely different skills (decoding vs comprehension), both of which are important for reading?
     
  8. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Do you know what phase 3 is SOAPy?
    If they haven't already been taught phase 3 they haven't been taught all the letters of the alphabet never mind all the sounds ... 6 months into the year !
    they haven't been taught j, q, v,w,x,y, z .... !
     
  9. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I know why don't we go back to a letter a week ...
    Is this the same SOAPy who so recently complained reception teachers weren't teaching children how to read and write?
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I think the example was SOAPy's attempt at sarcasm
    you will find they are called captions in the L&S document

     
  11. These were reception children not Year 1
     
  12. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    and the expectation is that they will know these in the first term. My youngest knows all the long vowel phonemes and is able to find digraphs and trigraphs in words, split digraphs and vowel digraphs. She is in reception and reading everything voraciously thanks to excellent, pacey precision phonics teaching. She was ready to do so because she had been exposed to all the prerequisites before she started school.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Well since they should be working on phase 5 in Y1 I should hope so!
     
  14. Somebody actually wrote 'My youngest knows all the long vowel phonemes and is able to find digraphs and trigraphs in words, split digraphs and vowel digraphs.'[​IMG]
     
  15. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    I did. And she's reading and enjoying everything and anything and deriving meaning from it and a great deal of pleasure. If that makes you sad I would question why you entered the profession.
     
  16. I agree girlycurly and doitforfree, My daughter 8 years ago started reception and after a chat with her teacher discussing she would be able to read all the keywords on display in the classroom and saying that she was able to read quite fluently, imagine my feeling when she came home with a stage 1 book, This was quickly sorted out with her teacher as when she realised her ability she was moved half way along the reading scheme with the teachers saying she could read the books from the higher level but due to her age she thought this is where she should start. I had no issue with this as books are to be enjoyed. She has continued to be a high achiever across the board and now in year 8 works at GCSE level, enjoys school and learning new skills like woodwork etc. In our we family we provided a rich learning environment, access to books , paper, etc . I never drilled her to learn words before she started school at nursery she came home with letters and keywords as we would get in the car she would say Ive got a today mum or my new word is to. Once she was told a word it never needed to be shown again for it to be recalled. My son has learning difficulties, he has struggled through primary school now in year 6 he is working at level 2c. He has had the same style of parenting and access to books etc . Please try not to judge parents isnt it a joy for a child to succeed, as I know how hard my son trys and even with our joint efforts with county and the school he makes little progress & does not tick the boxes for funding. All we have ever wanted as parents is for both our children to do the best they can.
     
  17. anon2799

    anon2799 New commenter

    Great post twister. I resent the implication that if children are able to read they must be the product of pushy parents. Simply not true. I don't go into my children's playgrounds as I am at my own school when they're being dropped off and picked up. However, I do overhear parents at parents evening comparing their children and I cringe.
    I had the misfortune to work in a school with incredibly pushy parents and some used to open the child's book bag to see if they'd moved up a book band, before even acknowledging the child at the end of the school day. Very sad. No matter how much I tried I couldn't seem to get through to them that children all progress at different rates. Trouble is the government don't seem to understand this either!


    If children are ready there is absolutely nothing wrong with teaching them the decoding skills they need to tackle complex words. Holding them back because others aren't ready yet is simply not fair.
     

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