1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Starting my NQT year at a sixth form - advice please!

Discussion in 'Further Education' started by katielouby, Aug 11, 2011.

  1. Hi all,

    I am thrilled and excited to be starting my first post teaching only sixth form in September. I am wondering if anybody has got any pearls of wisdom they would like to share about settling in? I am wondering about what to plan for my first lesson with new groups and the type of rules that I should be setting from the start. Also I have done my schemes of work and I am planning on starting the new year with about my first two weeks of lessons planned, does this sound about right? Any other tips appreciated.

    Many thanks!
     
  2. Hi all,

    I am thrilled and excited to be starting my first post teaching only sixth form in September. I am wondering if anybody has got any pearls of wisdom they would like to share about settling in? I am wondering about what to plan for my first lesson with new groups and the type of rules that I should be setting from the start. Also I have done my schemes of work and I am planning on starting the new year with about my first two weeks of lessons planned, does this sound about right? Any other tips appreciated.

    Many thanks!
     
  3. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Occasional commenter

    Homework is the main thing. Set clear expectations of punctuality and not plagiarising. You don't say whether you're in a school or a college, but either way you need to work with the disciplinary procedure and be prepared to follow it through. 16 year olds often aren't good at delayed gratification, so they need to be supported to do the work as they go along, especially if they've coasted through GCSE and aren't used to having to work hard. I'd also say try and use GCSE links to bridge to new material, give students something they know to stand on.
     
  4. Thank you for your advice and I'm working in a school. I do remember from my placements about the homework issue so I'll be firm with that from the start! I'm only teaching BTEC, so this is new to me but I think the nature of it means you need to provide ongoing support so I'll bear this in mind and keep track of individuals progress. None of the students will have studied the subjects I'm teaching at GCSE so it is going to be fairly new to them all anyway, I'll start from the basics. Thanks again!
     
  5. BillyBobJoe

    BillyBobJoe Occasional commenter

    BTEC is a rather different kettle of fish - I mostly teach A-Level but I've done some BTEC too. I'd say you need to be really on top of assignment deadlines, plan carefully when things are going to be handed in and what opportunities you will allow for upgrading, if any. Make sure you keep an eye out for anything that looks too well written and quiz students to make sure they understand things they've handed in. You will have a lot of assessment to do, make sure you can do it efficiently, and make sure your students understand the relative value of pass, merit and distinction to their future prospects.
     

Share This Page