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Stage 5 phonics - 'ch' alternative sounds

Discussion in 'Primary' started by KatharineH, Jan 14, 2012.

  1. I am a PGCE student on KS2 pathway. I am required to teach a phonics lesson on my placement (this Wednesday). I have only seen one lesson (ei - alternative sounds) and it will be on alternative sounds for 'ch'.
    Mr Phonics has a video reading a series of words which was helpful but this isn't a whole lesson plan.

    I know you should review, teach, practice, apply - but I don't really know what this looks like!

    I have a couple of vague ideas, but not enough for an interesting and useful 20 minutes.

    Any ideas would be so gratefully received!

    Thank you
     
  2. I am a PGCE student on KS2 pathway. I am required to teach a phonics lesson on my placement (this Wednesday). I have only seen one lesson (ei - alternative sounds) and it will be on alternative sounds for 'ch'.
    Mr Phonics has a video reading a series of words which was helpful but this isn't a whole lesson plan.

    I know you should review, teach, practice, apply - but I don't really know what this looks like!

    I have a couple of vague ideas, but not enough for an interesting and useful 20 minutes.

    Any ideas would be so gratefully received!

    Thank you
     
  3. We do phonics every day and it lasts about twenty minutes. We do synthesis of previous blends followed by new blend. Then move on to segmentation of previous blends followed by new blend. Next we write some words containing the new blend of the day as well as keywords. Finally we read off the display wall, the blends and keywords. This is differentiated throughout by the words given. We ensure that when we are teaching we are always checking childrens phonic knowledge. "ai, where do you usually find this in a word? give me another "A" blend, where would you usually find this?"
     
  4. Thank you, the questions to ask the children are especially useful.
     
  5. I am in Y2 so this may be too simple for you, but we follow a revisit/teach/practice/teach/prctice apply format for every lesson:
    Review - Flash cards of key words and words containing previous learnt phonemes (You could make some cards using words from the lesson you observed.) I see how many they can read in 1 minute.
    Teach - "Today we are going to learn how the "ch" grapheme makes the "c" sound etc. Model writing the grapheme and making the sound.
    Practice - Lets skywrite it/write it with fingers on our palms/write it in the corners of our whiteboards etc whilst making the sound.
    Teach - "I am going to teach you to write a sound using this grapheme. My word is "chris"." Then you model segmenting the word to write it and the thought processes involved.
    Practice - Their turn to write a word you give them.
    Apply - Write a dictated sentence, or read a sentence you have previously written. I often get them to circle the focus phoneme too.
     
  6. That's fantastic! I have to teach it in a year 2 class. I have made a matching game for the smartboard too (difference between ch in chop and ch in Chris). Thank you so much :)
     
  7. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    what about the ch in chef?
     
  8. Msz - hmm, as I am very new to phonics perhaps you could tell me how you would address this?
    If it crops up in my lesson I will congratulate the child on finding yet another example of a sound for 'ch'.

    What a wonderfully unpredictable language we have that incorporates words from many languages.
     
  9. Please feel free to email me at debbie@phonicsinternational.com if you would like to have some resources for 'ch' as alternative sounds /ch/ /k/ and /sh/.
     
  10. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I usually teach ch representing sh first but that's because I've had Charlotte and Charlene in my reception classes rather than Christopher and Christine.
    I would usually spend some time sorting word cards with a ch spelling into hoops depending on the sound represented so one hoop for <u>ch</u> one for <u>k</u> and another for <u>sh</u> then ask the children to generate other words for each sound.

     
  11. runaway

    runaway New commenter

    Any words with a 'sh' sound for the 'ch' eg chef, champagne, Charlotte etc tend to come from French. Useful if you are teaching French and shows how learning a foreign language reinforces your understanding of English too...
     
  12. runaway

    runaway New commenter

    Meant to add but pressed wrong button....
    The hard 'k' sound in Christopher, technical, chemistry tends to indicate the words are of Greek origin.
     
  13. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    Looking at word origins often provides a clear indication of which alternative spelling to use for the same sound.
     
  14. Thank you all for your advice and knowledge!
     

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