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Spoken Language

Discussion in 'English' started by DalekTeacher, Aug 25, 2011.

  1. DalekTeacher

    DalekTeacher New commenter

    Hi,
    I was wondering if I could ask as I do not have a language background but I am a little unsure about the definition 'utterances' and 'intonation.' I have never dealt with analysing Spoken Language, and have not been able to find one that explains it.
    Thank you,
    Dalekteacher.
     
  2. DalekTeacher

    DalekTeacher New commenter

    Hi,
    I was wondering if I could ask as I do not have a language background but I am a little unsure about the definition 'utterances' and 'intonation.' I have never dealt with analysing Spoken Language, and have not been able to find one that explains it.
    Thank you,
    Dalekteacher.
     
  3. Have you not looked on google?
    Utterance = a complete unit of speech. "Would you like a cup of tea?" = utterance
    Intonation = changing pitch of speech, e.g. "he's doing what?!" - when the pitch of "what" rises to show the exclamation, you could comment on the intonation
     
  4. DalekTeacher

    DalekTeacher New commenter

    Hi, thank you for this.
    I just wanted to check, so every statement said by a person is utterance so long as it is a complete one?
    I have a much more literature background than language one which is why I think I do not like it as much.
     
  5. gruoch

    gruoch Occasional commenter

    There is a unit on spoken language written by TESEnglish in resources.
     
  6. DalekTeacher

    DalekTeacher New commenter

    I've had a look at it. Thank you. I can't seem to find a mention of utterance though.
    Thank you,
    Dalekteacher.
     
  7. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    Whatever is said is uttered but utterances are given different meanings through intonation etc. If you google spoken language glossary or similar, you'll get plenty of definitions. I don't know about other boards but AQA emphasise the need for students to explore and state that it is not necessary to teach a wide range of terms. That said, 'utterance' and 'intonation' are words commonly used words.
     
  8. DalekTeacher

    DalekTeacher New commenter

    Thank you. I have got a glossary of terms that I found from a web site earlier this morning as well. I was wondering, if we are analysing a particular way of person is talking can they comment on the words and what they suggest? For example, if expressive language is used then evaluate what it suggests in relation to the question?
    Sorry for asking so many questions. Spoken Language is very new to me.
     
  9. GloriaSunshine

    GloriaSunshine New commenter

    It's new to me too. I'm not sure what you mean by expressive language. I haven't taught this unit yet but would suggest you get your head around the assessment objectives and Mark scheme. Most of the tasks address vocabulary choices as well as features of speech.
     
  10. I don't know what you mean by expressive language either, but yes you can discuss particular vocabulary choices: if someone says "I'm furious" as opposed to "I'm annoyed" then there's a clear difference in the severity of that emotion and the choice of language reflects that. You could expect a kid to say something like "person A replies that she's "furious" - she's clearly very angry and emotional which is reenforced by the increase in volume when she utters that particular word."
    don't get too bogged down teaching technical terminology - there's no point them identifying prosodic features if they can't explain them. I saw a very good B grade piece from the exam board that didn't refer to any terminology but explained language choice very well. Make sure you download all the examples from the exam board's website and that you read their criteria for different grades to get a clear sense of what you need to teach.
     

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