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Spelling help

Discussion in 'Primary' started by mystery10, Jul 11, 2011.

  1. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Please can you help me with this school spelling list. This is one of the weekly lists for a test. We are told to do Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check. We don't know what the "learning point" is so we don't know the best way of helping the child to remember them so that it is useful for future spelling, not just for the weekly test. There's no problem learning them for the test as such, but without understanding the wider point(s) I don't really know why we are doing what we are doing, and I'm not sure it's having any long term benefit on spelling - it might be, it could just be that I don't understand the purpose of the list in isolation.
    This is the list:
    middle
    giggle
    guzzle
    toggle
    stubble
    reliable
    vegetable
     
  2. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Please can you help me with this school spelling list. This is one of the weekly lists for a test. We are told to do Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check. We don't know what the "learning point" is so we don't know the best way of helping the child to remember them so that it is useful for future spelling, not just for the weekly test. There's no problem learning them for the test as such, but without understanding the wider point(s) I don't really know why we are doing what we are doing, and I'm not sure it's having any long term benefit on spelling - it might be, it could just be that I don't understand the purpose of the list in isolation.
    This is the list:
    middle
    giggle
    guzzle
    toggle
    stubble
    reliable
    vegetable
     
  3. The first 5 words show a short vowel sound followed by a double consonant. All have - le sound at the end.
    Not sure that helps- you probably noticed those!
     
  4. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Thanks - yes I did notice those and was going to provide more examples e.g. little, puddle, muddle, doddle, bubble, paddle, meddle etc etc ........... but I'm still not sure how to explain the last two, or if a little more can be made of the first five in some other way
     
  5. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

  6. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    Also found this rule:
    Using -le
    Words ending in -le, such as little, require care. If the vowel sound is short, there must be two consonants between the vowel and the -le. Otherwise, one consonant is enough.

    <table cellpadding="2" cellspacing="2"><tr><td>bugle</td><td>able</td><td>poodle</td><td>dawdle </td><td>needle </td><td>idle </td><td>people</td></tr></table>
     
  7. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    That's useful thanks, and any thoughts on how to know when to use -al or -il instead of -le.
     
  8. Mystery can I just say I think you over analyse all this spelling. Am I right in thinking your child is in year 2? I really think you are going overboard!
    The pattern is using -le and I agree with one of the earlier posters with their rules and examples.
    I do not understand why you constantly question English spellings and try to find rules - problem is that 99 times out of a hundred is that there are no rules.
    lots of us pick up spelling through osmosis and if your child is doing so much spelling work with you then its likely she will become an amazing speller.

     
  9. I am thinking of -al words
    optical
    magical
    I can't think of any that don't end in c like lyrical, I am probably wrong though i usually am!
     
  10. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Thanks Regency Rob but I think the wrong impression has been created ...... I simply do the lists the school has set but try to add something to the mystery of it if there is time.
    If spelling is purely random 99 out of 100 times as you suggest then why bother with the lists? With 7 words a week that's not going to be many words you can spell by the end of a school career. Yes spelling works by osmosis for some people - it did for me, but it sure doesn't for my daughter. And if it does happen by osmosis why bother with the lists? I'm a parent who would happily live without them and then do something at home if the osmosis doesn't happen. If you teach her with a random spelling list that every time you hear an /ul/ sound somewhere or other you spell it with -le that is what you will get back. Better not to bother with the lists at all and hope for successful osmosis.
    I can predict that give the list in its original form to my daughter to do the Look Say Cover Write Check on. She'll get 100% in the test at the end of the week and in a few weeks time the spelling list would be spelled as:
    midle
    gigle
    guzle
    togle
    stuble
    Also pencil would be pensle, petal would be petle, pedal would be pedle, metal would be metle
    And if you think this list is teaching that an -ul sound at the end of of a word is spelled -le, why doesn't it say that at the top of the list?
    Where would this list have come from?
     
  11. I am not sure where this list would have come from - could be from a huge number of propriety lists
    from the list that came out with the NLS in 1997 or a LEA list.
    i do not give out spelling lists but try to help the children understand the 'rules' whilst pointing out the words that do not follow the rules.
    Your daughter is spelling phoneticaly so I doubt she is dyslexic but I am not sure what her problem is!
    Just keep going with what you are doing I am sure it will have a positive effect!
    Did you ever buy a hickey?
     
  12. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Haven't got a Hickey yet, but I'm sure I will. I'm just working out what to do next year and if I go ahead and do the OU postgrad course in literacy difficulties I'm pretty sure I'll buy a copy. But I'm going to see what the school I'm going to be based at uses first so I don't shell out for nothing.
    It gave me a laugh when you said did you ever buy a hickey - it sounded like a good antidote to spelling mania until I remembered what it was.
     
  13. But as i explain on 51 of my little book which i believe u already have, Mystery,
    <font face="Times New Roman">Endings with a doubled consonant + <-le></font>

    Treble - pebble
    double, trouble - bubble
    Model - doddle
    Nickel - tickle
    Chapel - apple
    triple - ripple
    - supple
    Subtle. - scuttle Chisel. - drizzleCamel.Pommel, ussel.
     
  14. languageisheartosay

    languageisheartosay Occasional commenter

    Just to throw in another idea: how about looking at the reading rule that might be matched to the spellings? If you see a word with a Cle ending (Consonant+le), 'cut' that bit off. If the first syllable ends with a vowel, it will be a long name-sound vowel; if it ends with a consonant, that first half will have a short vowel. Compare rifle and bugle with puzzle and rubble. So if you read back what you've written, you can spot whether there should be a double consonant in the middle.
    I think I'm right that there are no -mle, -nle or -rle words so if you hear that (animal, final, squirrel) then it'll be spelt another way! The Cle words are 2-syllables so the longer words at the end of the list suggest one must look for another ending!
    Hope that doesn't add confusion or replicate someone else's reply.

     
  15. mystery,
    Two pieces of advice.
    1) Don't buy Hickey, it won't help with spelling. '
    2) Don't do Look, Say, Cover, Write and Check
    No., three
    3) Please stop stressing about spelling
     
  16. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    [​IMG]
    Whether it's good, bad or indifferent I think I might end up having to buy Hickey to help me weigh up different methods as part of the course - don't know yet.

    My daughter has to do Look Say Cover Write Check at home four times a week or she gets kept in to do it at school. I try to encourage her to do it a slightly diffferent way as suggested on here in a different thread - look, cover, say (and segment) write (saying each sound as you write it) check - by decoding and blending. But I don't think they do it like this all the time in school so it's hard to change a habit.
    Ah, but stressing about spelling is fun!!
     
  17. mystery10

    mystery10 Occasional commenter

    Language is hear to say - thanks will take a closer look at that, and Masha thanks too, was going to sneak a guilty look at your book today.
     

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