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Specific heat capacity interview!

Discussion in 'Science' started by Tato, May 17, 2017.

  1. Tato

    Tato New commenter

    Hi folks
    I am preparing an interview lesson on an introduction to SHC but it is only for 25 mins. All the practicals I know are quite lengthy. anyone got a suggestion as to a quick demo or activity?
    Thanks
     
  2. Alldone

    Alldone Senior commenter

    Classic demo is to show/ask why a balloon filled with water will not be popped by a burning match, but one filled with air will.
     
  3. truth_seeker12

    truth_seeker12 Occasional commenter

    A simple search on YouTube will bring you a lot of results.
     
  4. CheeseMongler

    CheeseMongler Lead commenter

    Alternative demo style would be to heat a small metal block in a Bunsen, drop into a large beaker of water and measure the temperature rise. By calculating the increase in energy of the water, you can then calculate how hot the metal block was.
     
  5. applecrumblebumble

    applecrumblebumble Lead commenter

    Just wondering if you could put the idea of specific heat capacity in some sort of context. A practical we used to with Salters was warming dry soil and water with radiant heat lamps and measuring the temperature rise over a period of time. Pupils may well be familiar of the land warming faster than the sea from geography and maybe physics so could be used as a hook into discussion of why this might happen.
     
  6. phlogiston

    phlogiston Star commenter

    Over such a short lesson, I might think of heating two beakers of water for the same length of time, one with twice as much water as the other and thinking about why the temperature change is smaller with the big beaker.
     

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