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Special needs

Discussion in 'Special educational needs' started by oldsomeman, Sep 1, 2020.

  1. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Forgive me posting in here but I am out of date and now a retired teacher.
    I did post this in another forum but got no response so im wondering if someone can answer my questions, please.
    Again a question.
    In primary at what level of assessment is a pupil moved onto getting external help, being provided in term of financial and professional help.
    If I remember correctly it used to be level 3 when I was a primary teacher. I had to provide my own work scheme for dealing with pupils with needs. ie setting appropriate work, teaching and assessing the needs of the pupil along with the SEN co-ordinator in school.
    Today, after what level is more intervention support i supposed to be offered to the individual and the teacher?
    In secondary:
    Do special need assistants work alongside pupils in schools. Do they stay with the student all day or only in some lessons such as Maths and English? Or are used ad hoc as needed. We never had special need assistants in Secondary schools when I taught in them, so I am unsure. Because classes groups were set, it was assumed you taught each set level according to their ability and capability.
     
  2. Dodros

    Dodros Star commenter

    I'm a long-retired secondary school special educational needs and modern foreign languages teacher, but for many years during retirement I worked voluntarily in my former school's SEND department, helping with record-keeping and resource-making. I can't speak for primary school practice at all, but in my secondary school classroom assistants were either assigned to lower-ability classes wherever they were needed and not just in the core subjects English, Maths and Science. Their allocation depended on staff availability, which became scarcer and scarcer as the years went on and money to employ learning support assistants became tighter and tighter. LSAs were also allocated to individual students with EHCPs (Education, Health and Care Plans) with the necessary entitlement and they followed their allotted students around when they proceeded from lesson to lesson. When I finally retired from my voluntary work over a year ago, there weren't many LSAs left, but the ones still there were mostly senior LSAs specialising in major areas such as ASD, numeracy etc. So as to your question whether they are used ad hoc or assigned to students, it all depends at secondary level. Such LSA cover must be justified and proven to bring results after periodical review.
     
  3. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Thank you, as its a long, long, time since I taught in Secondary.
    My grandson has an LSA attached to him, but im wondering if that assistant is with him in all lessons or just some.
    His problems are behaviour problems and he seems to gain support for this.
     
  4. Dodros

    Dodros Star commenter

    Is your grandson on the SEN register at, say, SEN Support or EHCP level? If so, do you know the specifics of the impairment (e.g. autistic spectrum disorder (ASD), social emotional, and mental health (SEMH) issues) leading to his inclusion on the register? There ought to be an annual review of provision attended by parents, SENCo, any external agencies involved and possibly the LSA attached to him when all parties report progress. There is an opportunity then to ask questions about the details of his support. Between reviews, both SENCos (responsible for identification and provision of SEN conditions) and Heads of Year (responsible for student discipline) should be available for family liaison.
     
  5. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    I believe all you mention does occur.My grandson has the sort of personality that if someone said punch him, he would, literally and just say he asked me to do it so I did it. Even in class, but thankfully he is being sorted, but not without fights over support and his statements.Att he same time he is a very clever boyand not to be underestimated.
    Thanks for your advice.
     
  6. minnie me

    minnie me Star commenter

    I think there is a tendency wrongly in some settings to associate SEND with lower attaining students ? There are those with complex needs who are often above average ability academically but for a number of reasons underperform. Intelligence takes diverse forms but in our exam orientated system other qualities / aptitudes are rarely valued / allowed to flourish . When I rule the world :rolleyes:? Often settings ( I was Secondary ) would try ( not on my watch ! ) to redistribute these students to alternative groups to avoid not dealing with the difficulty / disability ? Not helpful not inclusive and not acceptable ...
     
    Flanks likes this.
  7. catbefriender

    catbefriender Lead commenter

    Hi Oldie

    The term isn't LSA anymore it's EHCP which stands for Education, Health and Care Plan. It outlines any special educational needs a child has, and the provision a local authority must put in place to help them. It is possible that your grandson hasn't got one, because he is not deemed to need one, but is on the SEND register at school for additional support nonetheless.

    Find out whether your grandson has an EHCP in place and what it says.

    Good luck in supporting him reaching his potential. He's lucky to have a Grandpa like you.:)
     
  8. Dodros

    Dodros Star commenter

    LSA=Learning Support Assistant. EHCPs (Education, Health and Care Plans) replaced Statements of Special Educational Needs when the latest SEND Code of Practice was introduced.
     
    Flanks and catbefriender like this.
  9. catbefriender

    catbefriender Lead commenter

    Yep, got my teaching acronyms mixed up again.

    Thanks for correcting me.:)
     
    Dodros likes this.
  10. oldsomeman

    oldsomeman Star commenter

    Thank you for seeking to put me right lol. It is appreciated.
     

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