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SPD

Discussion in 'Parenting' started by Englishrose2010, Jun 20, 2011.

  1. Have also posted this in pregnancy, but thought I might get some replies here too!......
    Hi all.
    I am 25 weeks pregnant and just been told by my doctor that I have SPD. I have been referred for some physio, but have been told that the NHS waiting will probably be 6-10 weeks. I think this is ridiculous as I will almost be ready to drop by then! I am going to research into going privately, but wanted to know if any of you ladies who have had it previously, if there is anything I can do to ease the pain? I am fairly ok at school at the moment and have to sit down occassionaly. The only thing I am really struggling with is writing reports and marking as I am finding sitting at a computer or desk for a long periods of time just so painful- or maybe im just using it as an excuse not to get them done?! lol.
    Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  2. Have also posted this in pregnancy, but thought I might get some replies here too!......
    Hi all.
    I am 25 weeks pregnant and just been told by my doctor that I have SPD. I have been referred for some physio, but have been told that the NHS waiting will probably be 6-10 weeks. I think this is ridiculous as I will almost be ready to drop by then! I am going to research into going privately, but wanted to know if any of you ladies who have had it previously, if there is anything I can do to ease the pain? I am fairly ok at school at the moment and have to sit down occassionaly. The only thing I am really struggling with is writing reports and marking as I am finding sitting at a computer or desk for a long periods of time just so painful- or maybe im just using it as an excuse not to get them done?! lol.
    Thanks in advance for any help!
     
  3. i was on crutches from 15 weeks with this. NHS physio was awful. they gave me a belt that jsut dug into my stomach and told me there was nothing they could do.
    i had a bad fall at 28 weeks and was in such pain i decided to try a private physio in desperation and it was brilliant. i was in less pain for about 5 days after the treatment - still needed crutches to get around but wasn't in constant agony. i also bought a belt recommended by the physio - a lot narrower and stronger than the free NHS one and it really helped.
    walk as if you have your knees tied together is also the best way to walk to stop causing your ligaments any further damage.
    good luck x
     
  4. hhhh

    hhhh Lead commenter

    Get an appointment to talk about the birth, not just the 5 min check your pee normal appointments. Seriously, you may be better off having a CS-my secondcousin got problems cos of medics having her legs too wide apart at the birth. I obvioulsy am not qualified to comment, but you need to talk seriously to someone who is. Your sit may be differnt to hers, I know.
     
  5. Paradoxicalgirly

    Paradoxicalgirly New commenter

    I had a different pregnancy related pelvic condition which started the week before discovering I was pregnant. As soon as I found out I was pregnant in week 4, I rang the GP to tell him and also told him that my pelvis was in a lot of pain and that I was struggling to walk. I got an NHS appointment with a specialist physio in week 6.
    I walked with a stick from them until I also developed SPD in week 20 when I went onto crutches.
    I found that acupuncture helped with the pain. However I had to give up both physio and acupuncture as I couldn't drive because of the pain.
    I was prescribed codeine by the GP and also I used magnesium oil to help the pain. I found the belt of little use towards the end.
    I ended up having a c-section. I found labour pain not too bad, but when the midwives tried to force my legs to open wider - the pain in my pelvis was unbearable.
    The good news was that the pain more or less went straightaway (was expecting that with the SPD but not with my other condition!) and I can walk unaided and only experience problems now with stairs!
     
  6. Wylfie

    Wylfie New commenter

    Urgh this brings back horrible memories for me! I was in exruciating pain from about the same time as you and came on so quickly. At its worst it felt like someone had ripped my two legs apart! I got an appointment really quickly in MK but it was just a group appointment where they just told us what it was and a few strategies to help getting in and out of the car (keep legs together) and sleeping (pillow between legs) which helped to an extent but I too sought out a physio who, although didnt really help with the pain, did help me psychologically by explaining more carefully what was happening to me and just manipulating my body for a while which was quite relaxing! I had already planned to finish work at feb half term (LO was born beginning of April) and I quite literally could not have carried on and towards the end was pretty much housebound (blub). As for pain management paracetamol didnt touch it and wasnt keen on taking anything stronger for long periods so the only respite I had was lots of sitting (for short periods as the pain on getting up after a long sit was terrible). Sleeping was a no no for a couple of months which actually prepared me well for little one arriving, the broken sleep I have had since she has been born has been glorious! When you're thinking about the birth difinitely think about pain management. I had my waters broken in the end and ended up in agony from hyper stimulating and therefore the increased amount of examinations, ie opening of legs, which was just awful. Had epidural and at the end of it all had to have a bloody c-section anyway!!! Like a previous poster said it was so lovely to get out of bed the next day pain free-like some kind of miracle- but my body feels all out of sync and had slightly painful clicky hips'pelvis for a while. Think the worst thing now is that because of my long period of relative immobility I ended up carrying more weight and am completely unfit!!
    Not sure how much this will help, but even though it won't feel like it there is an end almost in sight. I was very lucky with my head teacher who was more than willing to make adjustments while still at work so I would advise you speak to them as soon as possible so you don't have to take too much (if any) time off work.
     
  7. it is true about talking about birth.
    i refused and epidural because i didn't want to be in a position where they forced my legs into a position which caused me further, permanent damage.
    i gave birth standing up and didn't have my legs in stirrups at any point. i did however refuse episiostomy, ventouse, forceps and induction under all circumstances. you do have to be very careful.
     
  8. Both midwife and GP were quite disparaging about my complaints of pelvic pain - basically "you're pregnant, what do you expect?". I was distraught because I knew it didn;t feel natural to be in that much pain - and I only had a mild case. I found I had to sit down loads in work, couldn;t walk very far at all and had to be very careful getting out of the car and climbing the stairs. My area didn;t provide the support band free but let me try on loads of different types and sizes so I could buy one myself. I got a spider band - one with a solid panel at back then four velcro 'arms' on either side to crisscross under bump. It really did help me. Physio recommended giving birth on all fours, but I ended up in stirrups and was too out of it to really think about the damage that could be done! I don;t know if it was this that meant that my pelvis only felt back to normal in the past month or so (LO is nealry 11 motnhs). up until then i found that if I took a big step I was in agony, and the worst was getting in and out to put baby in the car seat in the back of my three door car.

    I got one of those long pillows for between the legs which helped. Midwife suggested sitting on a carrier bag in the car and then using that to help you swivel your legs round for getting out, but i was pregnant in the summer and it would have been really sweaty!
     
  9. Trudy

    Trudy New commenter

    I agree with all the sound advice above, I had SPD in both my pregnancies, managed to get away without using crutches or anything, but struggled to walk far from about 6 months. I definitely recommend the pillow between your legs in bed, to help with turning over - keep your legs together as you go. I still use that now and my youngest is 21 months old - I don't find it comfy to sleep without a pillow to support my pelvis even now.
    Try not to crouch down - if you need to pick anything up off the floor, go onto your knees gently, and back up again like that.
    I do hope you get a physio appointment soon, I would go private if I were you - you need to be seen ASAP so that you can treat the symptoms you have now before it gets any worse. When I went to physio with my second, at about 14 weeks, she said my posture was horrendous - I was leaning back when I thought I was standing straight. That was putting more pressure that I needed to on my pelvis. It got much better for a few weeks by altering my posture, until my bump got bigger and I had to lean back or I'd fall forward!
    Good luck, and great big hunk of sympathy x
     
  10. 1. Contract all muscles as much as possible when rolling over at night...it still hurts but is more bearable.
    2. Don't think that sitting will make it better..it doesn't!
    3. The belt made mine worse but it depends on the person.
    4. The clicking and grinding sounds terrible but didn't seem to do any long term damage.
    I had spd with my second and the birth was no different from my first; but gas and air with both (nothing else).
    I have no pain now, stopped more or less immediately. I remember the agony though. Hope all works out well.
     

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