1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. Hi Guest, welcome to the TES Community!

    Connect with like-minded professionals and have your say on the issues that matter to you.

    Don't forget to look at the how to guide.

    Dismiss Notice

Sound poems or a composer study - MUSIC

Discussion in 'Primary' started by scaredstudentteacher, Mar 4, 2011.

  1. Music is not my forte and I am in preparation for placement and have the option to either do a composer study or look at sound poems with percussion.

    I am leaning towards COMPOSERS.

    Has anyone completed a SOW on a specific composer and can point me in the right direction by suggesting a suitable composer for yr5/6 or associated appropriate activities.

    Thanks.
     
  2. Music is not my forte and I am in preparation for placement and have the option to either do a composer study or look at sound poems with percussion.

    I am leaning towards COMPOSERS.

    Has anyone completed a SOW on a specific composer and can point me in the right direction by suggesting a suitable composer for yr5/6 or associated appropriate activities.

    Thanks.
     
  3. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    Do you have a composer or period of music that you are particularly fond of as a starting point? Your question covers such a huge range!
    I have done work with this age group about Satie, Prokofiev, Stravinsky, Holst, Britten and Glenn Miller to name a few. You really need to choose a composer that you really like so that you can complete the work with enthusiasm. Have you been set any guidelines as to what sort of work you have to do? Is there an outline scheme already in place? Is it merely a historical study or do you have to combine practical activities? How many hours of teaching is it for?
    Like the pun. Music is not my forte! [​IMG]

     
  4. I like Vivaldi.. four seasons and have 3hrs to do a study on a composer.. there is no frame and the teacher didn't suggest any so I feel a bit helpless tbh. :) I only see the pun now. I would quite like some practical activities and maybe some history but I really want the children to find it enjoyable and memorable rather than some dusty lessons.
     
  5. clear_air

    clear_air New commenter

    I have found Debussy good with primary age children. He fits into the impressionist movement (end 19thC), so he's easy to link up with impressionist artists (Monet, and all that lot). La Mer (or is it Le, I can never remember?) is a good one for painting 'sound pictures' - you could do some dance with it, and some composition using percussion. You could extend that into graphic scores - I'm not sure which musical lot started using graphic scores, (modernists??) but...
    Debussy's Claire du Lune (moonlight) can also be compared with Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata...
    What else are they studying in class? If they have a theme, then you could pick something to fit in with that eg Tudors and early music?
    Hope that helps [​IMG]
     
  6. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

    Hi there - first thoughts using Vivaldi and four seasons
    Italy - Venice - mapwork/geography
    Timeline - (1678 - 1741) - What was happening in Britain/the world at that time? Political history in Britain very interesting at that time (Whigs and tories), American independence stirring, inventions and famous people.
    Composer Contemporaries - Bach, Handel
    Four Seasons Listening Guide - create a listening guide either for you to use or to hand out to pupils.
    N.B. I would not attempt to listen to the whole thing in one session! In fact probable only listen to a taster of each movement - focus perhaps on one.
    The violin - Do you have a pupil who is learning to play the violin that could give a demonstration - how the violin is played, how sound is produced etc.
    Poetry - Vivaldi wrote a sonnett for each season - children write own poems
    Group compositions - each group produce own season music - think about pitch, timbre, tempo etc What makes a piece sound like winter? Icy tones, shimmering glissando, metal instruments etc.
    I have found some useful websites for you:
    Information about Vivaldi: (The first site is really useful as a resource for you)
    http://www.learn-ict.org.uk/resources/musicrsc/vivaldi/Site/frameset.html
    http://www.nyphilkids.org/gallery/main.phtml?
    Websites about instruments:
    http://www.playmusic.org/string/index.html
    http://ngfl.northumberland.gov.uk/music/orchestra/violin.htm
    http://www.dsokids.com/listen/InstrumentDetail.aspx?instrumentID=3
    http://www.sfskids.org/templates/home.asp?pageid=1
    Inventions etc:
    http://inventors.about.com/od/timelines/a/Seventeenth.htm
    Hope this helps. PM me if you want to chat in more detail.


     
  7. marlin

    marlin Star commenter Forum guide

  8. A few random thoughts...
    Michael Praetorius's 'Dances from Terpsichore' (1612) and Arbeau's morris dance are much better than they sound. They are bright and jolly and the ancient instruments groan, wheeze and howl in a wonderfully peasant way. Year 6's loved it. V. Tudor.
    Rossini's 'William Tell' overture has a marvellous evocation of the coming and going of a storm before the better known dududum dududum dududum dum dum part.
    (I once played 'Vltava' from Smetana's 'Ma Vlast' and one little girl who loved it drew a picture complete with a long and undulating row of d's which 'showed' the opening bars.)
    Mozart's concerto for flute and harp is beautiful. Overtures are good because they incorporate several different themes/characters - scurrying servants, pompous grandees, - donkeys...
    Peer Gynt suite, Handel's Firework music ..... stop. This is stretching 'few'.

     

Share This Page