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Sound or Phoneme?

Discussion in 'Early Years' started by BEXJ, Aug 4, 2011.

  1. Hi I like to teach phonics to children using the term sound/s and letter/s rather than phoneme and grapheme. Also I find that parents respond better to working with their children if the instructions are in plain english. In year one they use both terms and by year two it is phoneme and grapheme. We have some LEA bods coming in in September for a review and I just wondered what other people in early years do?
     
  2. Hi I like to teach phonics to children using the term sound/s and letter/s rather than phoneme and grapheme. Also I find that parents respond better to working with their children if the instructions are in plain english. In year one they use both terms and by year two it is phoneme and grapheme. We have some LEA bods coming in in September for a review and I just wondered what other people in early years do?
     
  3. I'm an NQT about to start in reception in September. However, in my first year of degree whilst on placement I learnt all the technical terms for phonics! The teacher I was working with taught the children using terms such as digraph, trigraph, phoneme and grapheme (I was working with a reception class), I found that the children responded well to this as it made them feel grown up because they knew 'big' and 'clever' words.
     
  4. I tend to use 'sounds' and 'graphemes'.
    This is because 'phoneme' and 'grapheme' are similar to one another so I avoid using both.
    It is because some of the units of sound that we have to teach are more than one phoneme such as /ks/ and /yoo/ - therefore 'sounds' covers all the units of sound whether one phoneme or two.
    It is because 'graphemes' means letters or letter groups therefore it is a very simple way of referring to all spelling alternatives and to avoiding the need for 'digraphs', 'trigraphs' etc. - it keeps it simple.
     
  5. Msz

    Msz Established commenter

    I use sounds and graphemes. My class know that the "posh" name for sounds is phonemes and graphemes means how we write the sound.
     
  6. cariad2

    cariad2 New commenter

    I use sound and letter shape. I wanted to put those in inverted commas and put this in brackets but I can't. Aargh. I hate confusing foreign keyboards.
    Anyway, back to the original point, I use the terms sound and letter shape, because I like to use plain English as much as possible - for the sake of the parents as much as for the children.
    But I do use the term digraph as I find that useful.
     
  7. I use the terms sounds and letter or letters, as in the sound /s/ can be written by this letter: s; the sound /igh/ can be written with these letters, ie. I think it is always better to avoid jargon where possible. Doctors could use technical/ scientific terminology when speaking with patients but tend not to. My daughter recently visited a specialist at the hospital who explained everything in language that I and my daughter understood. Subsequently we received a copy letter the specialist had sent to the GP which of course was written in correct medical terminology - all Greek to me! I think that sometimes it is difficult enough to get a message across to parents (and even teachers) without deliberately complicating it. Plus it makes you sound a little pretentious.
     

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